Metastatic Melanoma Patient Diary Entry

Diary Entry – Patient With Male Breast Cancer and Melanoma

I’m 72 and have lived most of my life in the Midwest, particularly Michigan, with forays to East Coast and West (New York, California) and two years in Sao Paulo, Brazil with lots of visits afterwards. Profession has been education on middle, high school and college levels as teacher and administrator. I decided when informed of my most recent illness to finally retire from university teaching in a grad teacher education program.

My first cancer was male breast. One of about 1400 a year in the U.S. Stage 2, no recurrence since diagnosis in 2003. Never worried about it returning. Second was metastatic melanoma, Stage IV, this year. Total surprise. I skipped Stages I-III with an unknown primary. Landed in my lung. All removed with a lobectomy (rhymes with my previous lumpectomy). I am now NED to hear this week after PET scan and brain MRI whether that continues to be true. I’m in the watch and wait category for further treatment–probably surgery first, then ipi*.

I don’t know how I am going to do with the program of 3 month scans. I do know I will have to live my life in 3 month chunks, but, of course, do not know how that will work psychologically. I have a very supportive wife, but she worries, too, of course.

April 2013

Had my surgery last Tuesday, back home late Thursday. Watching a good deal of snow out the window. I don’t mind at all not being out driving in it. It’s nice to be snug. We’re a snow belt city, one of the top fifteen or so in the country for total snow fall. I’ll have to look that up. Average winter just about 70 inches. I got into snowshoeing a couple of years ago at a buddy’s place in Sun Valley. Can’t make the reunion of the crowd this year.

Recovery is coming along. No exercise for another week. Then back in the pool, I hope. Can’t even walk around the block (not today, of course). Tomorrow I can drive. MelanomaDiary

“I’m feeling more and more optimistic about the melanoma. I think that’s better than looking around the corner. I have a lot going for me right now, and I’m convinced the ipi is working. Just not sure how well. I heard a doctor on a webinar yesterday say that those for whom ipi really works are like people who win the lottery. Why me? But it is you, and you’re done with melanoma for life. I’d like to be one of those 15%. I’d rather be that person than win the real lottery, no matter how big the payoff.”

As of August 2015 – Still thriving!

 

*”Ipi” refers to ipilimumab, a new monoclonal antibody drug that is being used currently in numerous melanoma clinical trials. Ask your medical team about these trials, or you can browse trials by using various trial finders such as the ones on cancer.gov or Melanoma Research Foundation.

Read more about patients and their experiences with clinical trials at www.TreatmentDiaries.com.  Real people, actual stories, shared in private so you can be more social about your health.