Words of Advice from a Lung Cancer Survivor

Screen Shot 2015-10-22 at 5.16.16 AMWhen I was diagnosed with lung cancer, it was a shock. It was like a fist to the stomach- and it turned my life and my loved ones lives- upside down.

My world changed immediately and drastically. But I had to learn quickly not to let fear, shock, anger or distress keep me from advocating for myself.

I learned very quickly that you have to be your own champion.

So, how does a lung cancer survivor best advocate for themselves?

  • Never take no, or inaction (a form of “no”), as the final answer. Keep fighting. Your life is the most important to YOU! Don’t give up. If one doctor tells you to give up, find another. Keep fighting.
  • Research your doctor. What do others say about him? Where was he educated? Is he interested in research? Is he with a private practice or a university hospital?
  • Not all treatment facilities are created equally. The US News and World Report publishes a list of best hospitals every year. The National Cancer Institute designates certain hospitals that have been proven to deliver cutting-edge cancer treatments to patients. Other hospitals also deliver excellent services, but if you are uncomfortable with the treatment you are receiving, keep looking for a facility in which you have confidence.
  • You know your body best. If something doesn’t seem right, make sure your doctor knows. And takes it seriously.
  • Keep in mind that your oncologist works for you. If, at any moment you decide he is not doing an adequate job for you, fire him. You do not have to continue trusting your life to him if he loses your faith. Your medical team holds your life in their hands. Find the ones you trust completely.
  • Conduct your own research. Look at respected sites, such as LUNGevity, American Association for Cancer Research, Bonnie Addario Lung Cancer Foundation, American Cancer Society, American Lung Association, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), etc. Make sure that you can differentiate between opinion and vetted study results. If you are aware of what is out there, you can advocate for yourself. Unfortunately, not every doctor knows what all of the latest treatments are.
  • Start a binder or a file where you keep important test results and copies of your scans. List questions for your doctor so you don’t forget when you get into his or her office.
  • Take along a friend or family member to doctor visits. Two sets of ears are better than just one, especially if you receive some shocking news during the appointment.
  • Join support communities (in-person or online or both). It helps to spend time with others who “have been there, done that.”
  • One of the best organizations that I have associated with since my diagnosis is LUNGevity. It is dedicated to funding research for lung cancer and to providing HOPE to all lung cancer survivors. If you want to spend time with others who have lung cancer and exude HOPE, get involved with LUNGevity!
  • Spend time spreading the truth among your friends and acquaintances! Unlike what the general public, and unfortunately, even many doctors, believe, lung cancer doesn’t just happen to smokers. It doesn’t matter if you smoke or don’t, are white or black, male or female, young or old, skinny or fat. Lung cancer happens to people with lungs.
  • Try to maintain as normal a life as you can. Eat as healthily as possible. Drink plenty of water. Exercise as much as you are able. Smile, even if you don’t feel it. Watch happy movies and laugh. Cancer is an awful disease and none of us want it. But, it doesn’t have to consume your every thinking moment. And, it shouldn’t.

It is hard enough to be diagnosed with cancer. But, when you are diagnosed with lung cancer, it is a double whammy. The misconceptions and stigma that are associated with lung cancer can make people look down on you or discount the importance of your disease and your fight.

lung cancer survivor

Donna is now a stage 4 lung cancer survivor.

Keep your head up. Whether or not you have a smoking history, everyone deserves quality treatment and compassion. No one deserves to die from lung cancer; no one deserves to be looked down upon because of lung cancer. Set aside any feelings of shame or guilt or if you never smoked, the question “why me”.   Become a champion for yourself.  And remember, there is hope.

My story is a story of hope.

Yours can be too!