Running From Cancer – And Towards Lower Risks

As you head out for your run, walk, or swim of the day, it’s good to know that in addition to the widely known cardiac benefits, exercise also brings documented results in lowering cancer risks. A recent study from researchers at the National Cancer Institute and the American Cancer Society found evidence that the current recommendation of moderate-intensity activity, now a little more than 20 minutes a day, is also a key component of cancer prevention. Steven C. Moore, Ph.D. noted, “Leisure-time physical activity is known to reduce risks of heart disease and risk of death from all causes, and our study demonstrates that it also associated with lower risks of many types of cancer.”

This may not be news to many because there have been literally hundreds of studies linking physical activity and cancer risk. This new study took a much larger look at the data, pooling information on 1.44 million Americans and Europeans ages 19 – 98 and followed the data for a median of 11 years. What stood out particularly was the reduced risks for breast, colon, and endometrial cancers.

Most studies targeting breast cancer show that physically active women have a lower risk of developing this kind of cancer. Depending upon the study, the risk reduction varies widely, between 20 to 80 percent. Activity starting in adolescence is found to be the most beneficial; however, that doesn’t let older ladies off the hook. No matter when an exercise program is started, active women enjoy reduced breast cancer risks when compared to sedentary women.

It is also estimated that daily sessions of moderate physical activity has a protective effect against both colon and endometrial cancers, from 30 to 40 percent reduced risk. One overarching question on all these studies is how does exercise reduce cancer risk? There seem to be a number of mechanisms in place including the lowering of hormone levels and insulin growth factors, improving the immune response, and reducing the time certain organs are exposed to potential cancer-causing substances. Exercise also seems to lower inflammation, which could play a role in cancer development. So, tie up those walking/running/cross training shoes and have a go at it! No matter how you look at it, exercise provides significant benefits on many levels in cancer prevention.

 

Sources:

http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes- prevention/risk/obesity/physical-activity- fact-sheet#q4

https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news- releases/increased-physical- activity-associated- lower-risk-13- types-cancer