Joan Justice

Board Member

Joan Justice is the former Executive Director at the Patient Empowerment Network. Joan has a background in healthcare and business. She received her nursing degree from L’Ecole d’Infirmiers in Nice, France and her MBA from SUNY Buffalo. Joan has held upper level managerial positions in domestic and international marketing for several large medical device manufacturers. Most recently, she managed HealthWorks Collective, the healthcare website in the Social Media Today network.

Joan lives in Charlotte, North Carolina where she enjoys the outdoors and is an avid runner and horseback rider.

Presentation Tips for Patient Advocates: Developing Effective Speaking Skills

As a patient advocate you may be invited to speak in public about your cause, and while some of you will relish this opportunity, many others will find it daunting. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, 74% of people suffer from speech anxiety. Surveys show that the fear of public speaking ranks as one of the most common phobias among humans. There’s even a name for it – glossophobia – the fear of public speaking. Whether you are daunted or excited by the prospect of speaking in public it pays to have a plan in place to communicate effectively.  For a presentation to impact an audience and be memorable, you must structure the content, design the slides, and use public speaking techniques effectively. Next time you are asked to deliver a presentation, follow this step-by-step guide designed to help you become a more confident, prepared, and persuasive speaker.

STEP ONE: PREPARE YOUR TALK

Good presentation skills begin with thorough preparation. Here are seven tips to help you prepare for your next talk.

1. Decide what you want to say. What is the purpose of this talk? What do you want your audience to know, feel, or do after they have heard you speak? Your presentation should have a purpose, something that the audience walks away eager to do. Write down your core message in one or two clear sentences. Include a call-to-action (CTA) detailing exactly what should happen next. If you find that you have several messages you would like to deliver, challenge yourself to focus and simplify your message. Once you have a clear focus for your talk, you can then group your other ideas around it.

2. Know your audience. Who will be coming to your talk? Why are they coming to listen to you? What do they already know about the topic you will be speaking on? Find out as much as you can about your audience so you can better speak to their interests and in the language they are most familiar with.

3. Do your research. Do you want to present facts and figures in your talk? Are there any research studies you could incorporate to make your core message stronger? Use online tools like Symplur, the Journal of Internet Research (JMIR), and Google Scholar to help you with your research.

4. Structure your presentation. Now it’s time to put your key messages and research points together in a structured way. Having a structure is a helpful roadmap to keep you on track and to allow the audience to follow along with your points. Start with astrong opening, for instance, share some compelling statistics, outline a current problem, or share a memorable anecdote. If you feel comfortable sharing a personal story, this is one of the most effective ways to get your audience to pay attention. Stories leave a lasting impression on listeners. Patient advocate Martine Walmsley points to the importance of sharing your patient story because the story “behind the diagnosis is a side researchers and clinicians don’t usually see. Don’t assume they already know those details.” (Read Why Your Patient Story Matters for more tips on how to tell your patient story). Healthcare consumer representative and patient experience consultant Liat Watson advises patients to speak from the heart. “People want to connect with you and your story”, she says, “Share like you are sitting around the kitchen table”.

Next, organize your main points into an order that will make sense to your listeners. Reflect on your key points and how you might emphasise them.  Finally, determine the take-home lesson (CTA) you want to close with and how you will convey this to your audience. Your CTA should transmit a sense of urgency. Why is it important they hear your message and act now?  What will happen if they don’t act?

5. Add visual interest. If you decide to use slides in your presentation aim to create highly-visual slides with minimal text. Never cram information onto your slides. Instead, present one idea per slide so the audience can process each point fully before being presented with another idea. By presenting only one point at a time the information is easier to understand, and the audience is less likely to experience information overload.  Avoid excessive use of bullet points, not only do they contribute to the phenomenon known as Death by PowerPoint, but they are also proven to be an ineffective method of communication for presentations. Take care when choosing fonts for your presentation– how you present your text is an important factor in making your slides clear and compelling.  Type Genius is a useful tool to help you find the perfect font type and which fonts complement each other.

For a change from the usual PowerPoint presentation, consider using an alternative such as Keynote (for Mac) Prezi or Haiku Deck. Whichever tool you decide on, your slides should be visually engaging.  Make good use of diagrams and charts and find some compelling images to hold your audience’s attention. When choosing an image make sure it is high resolution so that it will still look pleasing to the eye when it is blown up to full-screen proportions. Don’t be tempted to use an image you have sourced from a Google search unless the image is licensed “Creative Commons”. Instead look for images on sites such as Foter, Pixabay, and Unsplash, all of which gives you access to a bank of high resolution free-to-use photos. As a general rule of thumb, stick to one image per slide – anything more than that simply looks too cluttered.  If you want to add text to a background image, choose a background with plenty of “whitespace” which will allow the text to be read clearly. If your image is lacking whitespace, try applying a blur effect or a gradient fill when you want to add text to your background.

6. Stand and deliver.  Rehearse out loud using whatever slides, notes, or props you plan to use during your talk. Don’t simply practise by sitting at your desk clicking through your slide-deck; stand and deliver your talk as if you are doing it in front of an audience. Work on your voice intonation and emphasis, flow and transitions, and practise controlling filler words, like “ems” and “ahs” (Toastmasters Internationalpoints out too many fillers can distract your audience). Crohn’s disease patient, Nigel Horwood, who has spoken to a large audience of nurses at Kings College Hospital, London, UK, recommends reading your talk out loud when you are practising. “I find that simply reading through what I have written doesn’t pick up the likes of over used words or even ones that are missing. Much better to hear it being read,” he has written in his blog Wrestling the Octopus.

Modulate your speaking voice to a lower pitch (if you can do so without sounding unnatural); the deeper the pitch of your voice, the more persuasive
and confident you sound. In “The 5 P’s of Powerful Speaking for a Memorable Speech”, professional speaker Pam Warren points out that “in public speaking clarity and tone are far more important than volume in that they imply authority, a certain gravitas and above all, confidence.” When speaking on certain points you may want to stress their importance, so practise the power of the pause – a slight pause before you’re about to say something important.  Take a printed copy of your text and make marks, such as a forward slash (/) or use color coding in your paragraphs to remind you to pause at key points in your talk.

The most important thing you should practise is the opening of your talk. Focus on conveying a strong, confident start which will set the stage for everything that follows.  Time your presentation using a stopwatch, or one of the many free countdown timers available online. After practicing a few times on your own, ask a friend to listen to you. If you don’t want to do this, video or audio record your presentation so you can play it back and see how you might improve on delivery.

7. Final preparations. Make sure you have a good night’s sleep the night before your talk and have your clothes freshly pressed and ready on hangars. Back up your presentation to a flash drive (or the cloud), pack a plentiful supply of business cards and handouts (if you are using them). Health consumer advocate Melissa Cadzow recommends making it easy for people to follow up with you after your talk, by having a dedicated business card for your patient advocacy work. She also recommends including information on your LinkedIn and Twitter profiles and providing an email address in your presentation slides.

 

STEP TWO: DELIVER YOUR TALK

It’s the day of your big presentation. Plan to arrive early so you can familiarise yourself with the room, meet the technical team, check your slides are working correctly, and practice using the microphone.

When you take to the stage, resist the urge to begin speaking straight away. Take a few moments to ground yourself – set your feet slightly apart, toes pointing towards the centre back of the room (this gives you balance and is the most secure and comfortable way to stand when talking).  Pull your shoulders back and down – this allows your chest to expand, so you have more breath when you begin to speak.  Make eye contact and smile at your audience which will help to relax you if you are feeling nervous.
When you begin to speak, do so slowly and clearly to give your audience time to absorb your words. Remember to take full breaths between sentences.

Dealing with presentation nerves: Feeling anxious or being nervous before a big presentation is normal. If you feel nervous, focus on the fact that your audience wants you to succeed. They are on your side. You were chosen to speak and you are the expert they have come to hear. There’s no need to tell them that you are feeling nervous – people probably won’t even notice if you don’t mention it.  Whenever you feel those first signs of nerves such as a racing heart, sweaty palms and shallow breathing, bring awareness to the physical sensations, take some deep breaths and anchor yourself by touching something physical, such as a table or the slide advancer, or push your weight into your toes and feet.  It’s perfectly natural to feel nervous, but try to focus your attention away from your nervousness and concentrate instead on what you want to say to your audience. Recognize that nerves are a signal that this is something that matters to you. Turn your nerves into enthusiasm and passion for your topic.

 

STEP THREE: AFTER YOUR TALK

Spend time after the presentation to reflect on how things went. Ask yourself (or others) what you thought went well and what could have been better? Take some notes on which techniques worked to help calm your nerves, which stories resonated with the audience, and how you answered any questions in the Q&A.  The purpose of this exercise is to become a better presenter the next time you are asked to give a talk, by putting the lessons you learn each time into practice. Take every opportunity you can to practise speaking in public. Not only is it an important way to get your message out into the world, but mastering the art of public speaking is a wonderful way to boost your personal and professional confidence.


Editor’s Note: For another creative presentation design tool, please check out Canva.

The Digital Sherpa™ Program

The Digital Sherpa™ Program helps cancer patients and care partners become more tech-savvy in order to be empowered in their health and healthcare decisions. The program is currently carried out in two different versions, either a in-person, hands-on Digital Sherpa™ Workshop or through the creation of a Digital Sherpa™ Help Desk at well known cancer centers.

Cancer patients or care partners who express a desire to become more competent in Internet and social media skills will meet with college students who have been specially trained as Internet “Sherpas”. The students will offer help to find support and informational resources online and may include the following:

  • Information about their disease and other health resources
  • How to get help to become a self-advocate
  • Where to connect with other patients
  • How to become more tech-savvy

Please check out the video below that was produced from our pilot program.

Digital Sherpa™ Program from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

2018 Outcomes

In 2018, we carried out this program in partnership with Moffitt Cancer Center and Cancer Support Community, and the infographic below highlights some of the achievements of the Digital Sherpa™ Program.

 

Mobile Doctor’s Appointments? Do They Work?

Dr. On Demand Dashboard

Dr. On Demand Dashboard

Hate the doctor’s office and don’t want to go to Urgent Care or the E.R.? There’s an app for that. Doctor On Demand is a mobile application that allows you to have a video appointment with a doctor from your own home. On their website they claim, “At Doctor On Demand we provide fast, easy and cost-effective access to some of the best doctors, psychologists, and other healthcare providers in the country. Our patients can have Video Visits with these providers on their smartphone or computers at any time of day.” Recently a friend of mine used this app for the first time because of a strange lump in her armpit, so I decided to sit in to see what it was all about and if it can actually replace an in-person visit.

Before

First thing you do is download the app, create an account, and fill out your health and insurance information. Then, you are given the option to choose a specific doctor or specific time. If you chose the specific time route, you are assigned a doctor. My friend chose a specific time and told me that it was a very easy, user-friendly process. To prepare for the appointment, you fill out all your symptoms and take pictures of your problem (if applicable) to have on hand. I asked my friend why they chose Doctor On Demand over a traditional doctor, Urgent Care, or E.R., and she said this way she won’t have to waste time stuck in a doctor’s office, could be seen quicker, and the appointment times worked better with her work schedule. However, she was hesitant because the doctor would not be able to feel or see the issue in person, which may affect the diagnosis.

During

Once your call begins, the doctor begins by reviewing your chart before coming on camera. Next, the doctor comes on camera and asks to explain the problem and the symptoms she was having. The appointment is set up like a FaceTime call. The doctor assigned to my friend was very friendly and attentive. This when those photos you took beforehand are useful because then she asked my friend to upload the photos for her to look at.

After

After the issue was thoroughly explained, the doctor was unable to diagnose what was going on without further testing. She did explain the several possibilities of what could be occurring and what tests may be needed. However, in the end the doctor did recommend that my friend go see a doctor in-person to get an accurate diagnosis.

Overall

In conclusion, my friend was reassured that it didn’t require immediate attention and that she shouldn’t worry. She also felt better and more relax about the few days it would be before she could be seen by a doctor. She and I would both recommend using Dr. On Demand, especially for the simpler alignments, such as colds, because the doctors are able to write prescriptions to your local pharmacy saving you the time wasted in a waiting room. My friend had this to say about her overall experience:

“This was a quick solution to put my mind at ease that something more serious was not going on before I was able to schedule an in-person doctor’s appointment”

17 Tips For Patient Engagement

To kick off 2017 and new year of patient engagement and empowerment, we are showcasing 17 tips from patients, caregivers, and leaders throughout the industry. A special thanks to our partner, The Conference Forum and their Patients as Partners US program, for helping to obtain a few of these excellent testimonials. Their tips and advice are as follows.

 

1. Jack Aiello

“Patients and their care partners need to get educated about their disease and become their own best patient advocates.  The internet can be a great resource where disease specialists create videos on topics from disease overview to treatments and side effects.  And by getting 2nd and 3rd opinions from disease specialists, you put yourself in the best possible position to make good decisions with your doctor.”


2. Randy Broad

One very important aspect of treatment, especially at the time of diagnosis, is to understand what treatment options your oncology team is recommending and why.  Many providers have ‘pathways’ which determine how a specific cancer (and stage) be treated.  Be sure to fully understand what’s behind and underneath this directive.  Many times it can be determined based upon cost, not best options currently available.”


3. Matthew Zachary

“Patients have the right to survive with dignity and quality and we deserve to be treated age-appropriately. More so, they also have the right to be made aware of the relevant support resources they are entitled to so they can get busy living. This is what it means to face cancer.”


4. Cindy Chmielewski

“Knowledge is power. Educated patients are empowered. Educate yourself. Join a support community either in-person or online; follow the #mmsm hashtag on Twitter; subscribe to disease appropriate YouTube channels, listen to webcasts/podcasts presented by patient advocacy organizations and engage in meaningful discussions with your healthcare team.

Be a partner in your care. “


5. Jennifer Ahlstrom

“Don’t be afraid to speak up. Patients who ask their doctor questions, ask for explanations and treatment rationales get better outcomes. Myeloma is a very complicated disease and there are now an incredible number of treatment options available for patients. If you don’t feel comfortable asking your doctor questions, it’s time to find another doctor, preferably a myeloma specialist who treats hundreds of myeloma patients.”


6. Marie Ennis-O’Connor

“Becoming an empowered patient means taking personal responsibility for your health. You engage with health care providers and systems in ways that are proactive, rather than reactive. You take positive steps in the direction of the care that is right for you.”


7. Scott Riccio

“Remember that YOU get to define value for your own care.  Nobody can read your mind, though, so you have to share what you value, how it impacts you, and what tradeoffs you are willing to make to get the outcomes YOU want.”


8. Andrew Schorr

“Ask your doctor questions! How can we be sure my diagnosis is 100% accurate? How much experience do you have treating this illness? Are there other tests that can help me get the most on-target treatment for my case? What are all the approved medicines for my situation? Why would you recommend one over another? What clinical trials could be right for me, whether or not you have them at this clinic/hospital?”


9. Esther Schorr

“As a care partner, it really is a time to be hopeful as the advances in cancer treatment are moving very, very fast. As it is for the patient you love, it is key to stay educated about advances in treatment options that might be right, and be actively involved in discussions about genetic testing and clinical trials.  It’s also critical to lean on your personal community…friends, family, counselors…in order to “keep it in the road” and retain realistic optimism. As more and more survivors and care partners reach out to each other and share stories, we all gain insights and perspective – and you will hopefully feel supported along the cancer journey. We are all in it together, and we are here for each other.”


10. Amy Ohm

“Caregivers need self-care to effectively care for a loved one – always make sure to put on your oxygen mask first! It can be incredibly challenging to focus on ones health with the daily demands of care-giving. Make 2017 the year you assess your own health and strive to reduce daily stress. Connecting privately with those who relate and to share experience to learn from others can help. We want you to be health in the New Year!”


11. David Wallace

“It is imperative that you gain a solid understanding of your disease so you can become your own advocate.  Connecting with other knowledgeable patients via social media or online forums to learn what has worked or failed to work for them is a good start.  Understand the treatment options that are available to you.  See an MPN specialist who will work with your local hematologist.  If you are not being treated with care and respect, don’t hesitate to seek a 2nd opinion and change doctors until you receive the level of care you deserve.”


12. Carol Preston

“NEVER hesitate to ask questions.  In fact, write down your questions in advance, take them with you to your appointment and go through them one by one.  Be sure to write down the answers (or get your care partner to take notes) as a short pencil is far better than a long memory.  Better yet, record the QA on your smart phone so that you can listen later to the answers as you’ll retain only about 10% of what the doc tells you during your appointment.”


 13. T.J. Sharpe

“Patients and caregivers can be better engaged in 2017 by reaching out to their patient community and actively becoming involved in the support of fellow patients through person to person and group interaction.  Patients and their caregivers can raise the bar for everyone involved in healthcare so that the expectations of patients as a partner in their care is not just accepted, but standard and demanded by patients.”


14. Marilyn Metcalf

“Set our goals together in the New Year, and then work together on our plans and make them happen.”


15. Durhane Wong-Rieger

“Patients are basically a heterogeneous lot, coming with all types of experiences and talents, as well as desires and needs.  Some patients want to have a voice in high-level  policy and system decision-making; some want to extend a personal hand of support.  The more diverse the channels and opportunities for involvement, the more patients can take active and meaningful roles. Every person naturally wants to feel respected and empowered so it doesn’t take much to engage patients: provide a portal, support, information, acknowledgement and most important action.”


16. Deb Maskens

“Patients and caregivers get information from a wide variety of sources, from personal anecdote to television advertising to medical journals. Empowerment and engagement for patients and caregivers in 2017 needs to start by providing them with more information that is trusted, balanced, and objective. Information is power. Let’s give patients and caregivers the information they need as the first step for them to be empowered and engaged in treatment decisions that are right for them as individuals.”


17. Jeff Folloder

“Resource management.  I’m not talking about managing the funds to pay for treatment or care.  I’m talking about managing you.  I got great advice from a lady in a waiting room at MD Anderson.  She told me that every day we wake up with a bucket of energy that we can spend on anything we want and it’s gone at the end of the day.  We can spend that energy on quality things and be tired and fulfilled.  Or we can spend it on silly things like worry and regret and go to sleep tired and empty.  She’s right.  And I remember her words every day.”

The Conference Forum

The Conference Forum is a life science industry research firm that develops conferences primarily around how to get therapeutics to patients faster. We examine and challenge the complex ecosystem of drug development and delivery, bringing good ideas together from a variety of sources to help advance clinical research with common goals that are patient-focused.

The Conference Forum presents strategic level conferences, both public and private, as well as developing focus groups and advisory boards for professionals in the life science and healthcare industries. We currently offer conferences for pharma/biotech professionals including R&D leaders, CEOs, business development/licensing, medical affairs/safety, chief patient officers/advocates, clinical innovation champions, investors and drug delivery specialists. We are committed to creating the best content, exchange of ideas and solutions among peers, as well as providing high quality networking.

Intake.Me

Founded in 2013, Intake.me is an innovative digital health company located in Los Angeles building a patient­ and doctor engagement platform that lets patients capture all their health matters and share it with their entire health care team. Health care consumers, such as patients and caregivers, can track symptoms, conditions, diagnoses and store medical records in their private Intake.me account. Health care professionals can request that data via an electronic intake record from their patients before the medical encounter so that the limited time at each visit can be used more effectively and support shared decision making. Intake.me’s mission is to empower all your health matters through technology, education, and community. Intake.me launched the fast-growing health education site, ePatient101.com, with e-learning classes on patient empowerment, caregiving, and chronic disease management. Intake.me also hosts the popular Empowered Patient Chat #patientchat on Twitter.

“At Intake.me we’re passionate about empowering people in their health. As a cancer survivor myself, I understand the burden placed on patients managing multiple doctor visits and hundreds of medical records, tests, prescriptions, and more. With Intake.me, you can capture and track all your health matters in your own private, secure account and share them with your healthcare team at check-in. Win-win for both doctor and patient!” – Darla Brown, Founder

Cancer Support Community

The Cancer Support Community is an international non-profit dedicated to providing support, education and hope to people affected by cancer. Likely the largest employer of psychosocial oncology mental health professionals in the United States, CSC offers a menu of personalized services and education for all people affected by cancer. Its global network brings the highest quality cancer support to the millions of people touched by cancer. These support services are available through a network of professionally-led community-based centers, hospitals, community oncology practices and online, so that no one has to face cancer alone.

LUNGevity

We focus on research because the link between research spending and improved survival is clear. Survival rates have dramatically improved for colorectal, breast, and prostate cancers over the last several decades in step with the exponential growth in their research spending. Our goal is to accelerate progress for lung cancer in the same way, in order to dramatically improve on the current 17% five-year survival rate.

To date, LUNGevity has funded 110 research projects at 57 institutions in 23 states. LUNGevity research investments focus on early detection, because survival rates rise when lung cancer is detected while still localized. We also focus on more effective treatment approaches—getting the right treatment to the right patient at the right time to help people with lung cancer live longer and better.

Our projects are translational, moving basic research from the lab to patient treatment. We fund the projects most likely to have the greatest benefit for patients in the near term. Thanks to our Scientific Advisory Board—a group that includes leaders in early detection, genomics, proteomics, immunotherapy, biostatistics, and thoracic surgery—research project applications are rigorously reviewed in a robust, transparent process and then funded projects are carefully monitored. Through ongoing work with researchers across the various institutions, LUNGevity maximizes the progress and impact of ongoing studies.

LUNGevity also provides a community of empowerment, support, and hope for everyone affected by lung cancer through our extensive educational resources, online peer-to-peer support, and in-person survivorship programs, as well as more than 80 grassroots awareness and fundraising events held from coast to coast each year.

CanCare

CanCare, Inc. is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit organization that provides one-on-one, personal support to cancer patients and their loved ones by matching them with a survivor or caregiver of the same type of cancer they are experiencing. CanCare’s services are confidential and provided without charge.

Cancer Support Community Helpline

The Cancer Support Community is an international non-profit organization dedicated to providing support, education and hope to cancer patients. CSC’s website has a wealth of information and resources available, including links to advocacy organizations, online support groups and discussion boards and a Cancer Experience Registry where you can obtain information about your specific cancer and help with research in that area. CSC offers a wonderful service to cancer patients:

Cancer Support Helpline®

Whether you are newly diagnosed with cancer or a long-time cancer survivor or caring for someone with cancer, or a health care professional looking for resources, CSC’s TOLL-FREE Cancer Support Helpline is open Mon-Fri 9 am- 9 pm ET.

You are welcome to call anytime.  If you receive a recording, please leave your name and contact number and one of our counselors will call you as soon as possible.

Please call 1-888-793-9355 and a CSC Call Counselor will be happy to assist you with any of the following concerns:

  • Information about local, regional, or national resources
  • Finding a Cancer Support Community program near you
  • General information about the Cancer Support Community and its services (in-person, online and by phone)
  • Help in talking about some of the emotional and social worries that cancer sometimes brings into our lives
  • Information about, and assistance in, ordering Frankly Speaking educational materials
  • Help finding a nearby support group, online support group or discussion group to connect with others
  • Short-term cancer counseling and emotional support
  • Open to Options™ treatment decision support counseling
  • Make a donation to the Cancer Support Community
  • Access to CancerSupportSource™ online distress screening program
  • Live web chat available during call center hours – CLICK HERE TO CHAT NOW!

 

Disclaimer

The Cancer Support Community provides this information as a service. Publication of this information is not intended to take the place of medical care or the advice of your doctor. The Cancer Support Community strongly suggests consulting your doctor or other health professional about the information presented.

 

 

How Can Myeloma Patients Advocate For Themselves?

How can myeloma patients advocate for themselves? This Patient Café® was hosted by Jack Aiello, Patient Power host and advocate. He was joined by four different myeloma patients. Together, they share their stories, insights, and advice to become a self-advocates. Check out the full video below to hear from these patient experts.

How Can Myeloma Patients Advocate For Themselves? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.