Medical Bills, EOBs, and You

Medical bills are confusing, and often frightening. Even if it’s for something simple, the numbers add up fast, and to sometimes alarming levels. Add the Explanation of Benefits (EOB) documents you get from your insurer for the same clinical visit or hospital stay, and you can find yourself wondering how much you owe whom, and for what, exactly?

“Not A Bill”

This will be printed on all EOBs, and is the only sure way to tell which is an actual medical bill, and which is an EOB. However, an EOB can be confusing – other than that clear “Not A Bill” printed somewhere on the form.

This is one of the EOBs I got during my own cancer treatment. It’s for my lumpectomy, but the only way I’d know that is the dates on the form. The singular lack of information on what the EOB is for is one of the distinguishing characteristics of these forms, so knowing what the services were, and what your plan’s coverage is for those services, are important details. The numbers are indeed scary, given the Provider Charges of $50,231.25, and the Amount Paid of $0.00. Someone unfamiliar with EOB-ese might have a panic attack before getting to the important phrase “there is no liability on your part for these services” in Remark(s) Explanation 3.

“Statement of Account”

Here’s the summary bill from the hospital that covers the same services (my surgery), but this might only add to the potential for confusion.

The bill has slightly more detail than the insurer’s EOB, but not that much. It mostly seems to be to a series of magic incantations that take the starting amount – New Charges or Adjustments, $53,911.00 – and bring that down to an Amount Due of $50.00. My insurer paid $5,430.02, and there were Adjustments of $48,430.98, which leaves $50.00. On the one hand, hallelujah; on the other hand, what’s the story with that $48,430.98 “adjustment”?

If I didn’t have insurance, would I be on the hook for that whole $53,911.00? Probably, but it’s hard to know exactly. This is where the “chaos behind a veil of secrecy” that is healthcare pricing is most visible: hospital charges.

I learned a lesson from this bill, by the way: always ask for an itemized bill, not a summary bill. Ask for that during the admission process (if it’s a hospital), or at the medical office or testing facility during check-in.

Staying ahead of the healthcare cost curve

Here are my tips for figuring out your medical bills, and your EOBs, to ensure you get what you pay for, and only pay for what you get:

  • ALWAYS ask for an itemized bill, don’t just take a summary bill (the mistake I made with the billing for my own cancer surgery).

  • Review that bill, line by line. Make sure that it doesn’t have anything on it that you did NOT receive. Use CMS’s CPT code look-up tool to help you break down the blizzard of numbers. [CPT codes are the five digit service codes used by all medical providers; they’re in the column labeled Svc Code in the bill example above.]
  • Have your insurer’s Summary of Benefits documentation handy while you review the bill(s). That will be available on your insurer’s website.
  • Do not pay a bill until you get the EOB associated with those billed services.
  • Line up the EOB, and the bill, to make sure the dollars and the codes are correct.
  • Challenge any billed items that are for services you didn’t receive.
  • If services you received are listed as not covered by your insurer on your EOB, challenge that with your insurer’s customer service crew.

Yes, it takes work. And it’s a little crazy that the American healthcare system expects people, particularly sick people, to manage this blizzard of paper with scary dollar figures on it. But the only way to make sure you don’t pay more for your medical care than you should is to be proactive. It’s what empowered patients do.