Health Tips To Support A Senior Through Cancer Recovery

Cancer can happen at any age, but it’s most common in the elderly. The American Cancer Society explains 87% of all cancer cases in the United States are diagnosed in people 50 years old and over. Cancer in older age brings with it many unique problems, including, pain, depression, loss of strength and fitness, cognitive decline, and dementia. If you’re caring for an elderly cancer patient, it’s important you coordinate with their cancer team. Recovery plans focus on physical, social, and emotional health to give senior cancer patients the best quality of life possible.

Prepare healthy food

It’s never too late for anyone to start eating healthy. It’s important you give the elderly person you’re caring for enough nutrients from a variety of fruits, vegetables, dairy, pulses, and grains. Red and processed meat should be limited, or preferably avoided altogether. You should also check with their doctor whether they have any special dietary requirements.

Cancer patients often have reduced appetite. The key is to give them calorie-dense food — soups, smoothies, and stews, for example. It’s also important to set routine family meal times. Socializing is an important part of recovery.

Protect their safety

An elderly cancer patient is in a vulnerable position. Do your best to make sure they’re safe around the home before they return from the hospital. Install night lights in the hallways and bedrooms. Ensure carpet is securely fixed in place and remove loose rugs to prevent falls. They may need help with everyday tasks, such as, bathing, dressing, moving around, and going to the toilet.

Encourage exercise

Unfortunately, cancer treatment takes its toll on the body and mind. It often leaves patients fatigued, which is a feeling that can often strike without warning. Nonetheless, a gentle yet regular amount of physical exercise is highly beneficial seniors. Not only does it boost their mood, but it also helps improve mobility, strength, flexibility, and balance.

Give emotional support

Cancer treatment is stressful, but talking about it can help. While it’s up to the senior you’re caring for how much they open up, let them know you’re there for them if they want to talk. They may also be interested in joining a support group for practical advice.

Ultimately, it’s important your senior has a social and emotional outlet to support them and make them feel less alone. If you ever have any problems or concerns, let their cancer team know. You’ll be given as much help and support as you need.


About the Author: Chrissy Rose is a Content Manager and is working to build one of the best senior resource sites.