Applying Patient Advocacy Initiatives to Your Patient Journey #patientchat Highlights

Last week, we hosted an Empowered #patientchat on applying patient advocacy initiatives to the patient journey with special guest Seth Rotberg (@Srotberg15). Seth is a rare disease advocate and motivational speaker who is passionate about bringing his personal experience to better support the health community. The #patientchat community came together and shared their best advice and tips.

Top Tweets and Advice

 

You Have Power

 

 

 

 

Be Confident

 

 

 

 

Patient Advocacy Has Benefits

 

 


Full Chat

 

Patient Participation in Research: Towards Meaningful Engagement

“If patient engagement were a drug, it would be the blockbuster drug of the century and malpractice not to use it.” Leonard Kish

Have you detected a recent upsurge in activities concerning patient engagement in health research? If you are involved in patient advocacy, you may be increasingly aware of discussions around the importance of patient-oriented research. However, despite strong acknowledgement of the benefits of engaging patients in research, gaps still exist between the theory and the practice of patient engagement.  This article explores the ways in which patient participation in health research can move beyond rhetoric towards activity which results in research better aligned with meaningful patient outcomes.

What is patient participation in research?

You may notice that there is a wide range of terms used to describe patient oriented research.  Depending on which country you live in, you’ll hear a variety of terms from “patient/public/service/user/engagement,” to “participatory research,” “patient and public involvement,” and “co‐researcher/ co‐investigator.”

While there may not be a consensus for the terms used to describe patient oriented research, there is one fundamental concept that sets it apart from traditional research. In the past, patient participation was limited to involvement as research subjects. Research was undertaken by researchers to and for patients.  When patients are actively engaged, research is undertaken jointly with them.   This is an important step in ensuring that the real-life experiences of patients are considered in determining research priorities that are most relevant to patients themselves.

Why should you engage in health research?

There are many reasons why you may want to get involved in health research. Perhaps you wish to understand the research behind your disease and hope that involvement will give you direct access to knowledge of new treatments. You may also want to find a way to put your personal knowledge of the healthcare system and your experience of your condition to good use. In this way you can play a part in improving care for other patients. Those patients who take an active part in aligning research with real-world needs of patients and caregivers report feelings of increased self-confidence. By developing a stronger advocacy voice they feel more empowered, respected, and valued.

By engaging in research you can broaden the agenda beyond that set by health professionals and researchers. As someone who directly experiences illness and medical care, you can bring the perspective of what it is like to live with a disease. You’re uniquely positioned to contribute to research by sharing important ideas about what research would be most beneficial to you and other patients like you.  

How can you get engaged in research?

Patients can be engaged across a spectrum of research from planning and priority setting to disseminating findings. The deeper the degree of participation, the greater the influence you will have in decision making.    Becoming involved at the outset of the research project means you can identify relevant research questions and meaningful study endpoints.

Historically, researchers have framed questions which are not particularly relevant to patients. As an example, the research priorities of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee and the clinicians looking after them, were shown in a study to favor more rigorous evaluation of physiotherapy and surgery, and assessment of educational and coping strategies. Only 9% of patients wanted more research on drugs, yet over 80% of randomized controlled trials in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee were drug evaluations.


Research Stage 

Level of Involvement

Identifying/Prioritizing Determining the research topic, alignment of priorities, and identification of research questions.
Design Ensuring that the research methods are sensitive and appropriate for study participants.
Management Recruiting study participants; conducting interviews; being an active member of a steering group.
Data Analysis Highlighting findings that are most relevant to patients; summarizing the research for lay audiences.
Dissemination Improving access to patients via peer and social networks and accessing difficult-to-reach patient groups.

How do you know if participating in research is right for you?

It’s important to understand the reasons why you are being asked to take part in a research project. You and the research team should have a shared and clear understanding of what you are being invited to do.  Sometimes researchers look for patient participation to fulfill a funding requirement, without being clear about the role that patients will actually take.  Without a clear understanding of what meaningful engagement looks like, researchers may end up including patients solely to tick a funding box. Taking part in this kind of tokenistic research can be extremely unsatisfying and leave you feeling undervalued and frustrated.

Asking the following questions of the research team can be useful to help you decide whether or not a particular research project is right for you.

  • What level of involvement do you want from patients?
  • What change can happen as a result of this engagement activity?
  • What is my role? (Ask for a written “job” description.)
  • Are there any particular skills you are looking for? Do I need to understand research methodology, acronyms, and technical language? Will training be provided if I’m not familiar with research processes?
  • What is the time commitment you will expect of me? (You should take into consideration your other work or family commitments. For instance will you need to take time off work to attend meetings?)
  • Where will meetings be held? Are there accessibility issues you need to be aware of?
  • What preparatory work will be required to carry out in advance of meetings (e.g. pre-reading?)
  • How will I know if my input is incorporated in the research findings?
  • If my feedback isn’t used, will you share the reasons why not?
  • Are you paying patients? (Reimbursements for out‐of‐pocket expenses should be viewed as an absolute minimum.)

If you’re not satisfied with the answers you receive to these questions, then you should consider whether the project is something worth giving up your time for. Participating in research is time-consuming and sometimes it can be emotionally and physically draining. Consider too at what point you are in your own health journey. Will participation in research place an added burden on your treatment or recovery?  In making the decision to become involved in research, you should always balance your own health needs with the desire to be supportive of research and the research process. Heed the advice of pediatric neurodisability advocate, Jennifer Johannesen “if there is insufficient effort to justify and substantiate what is being asked of you, or it’s unclear as to why you’re involved, you can decline.”

Meaningful engagement is about shifting the traditional paradigm of patients as passive participants, to one in which we are fully involved as active contributors who have a sense of ownership in outcomes. You need to be able to trust that you are being genuinely heard and your concerns are being acted upon. Look for projects that champion diversity, reciprocal trust, and strong sustainable relationships. Ask for no less than this – research that respects your unique perspective and expertise and values your contribution as an equal partner in the research process.

Notable News: Chemobrain

Sometimes the most notable information isn’t the latest research or current news story. Sometimes what is most notable is what is most pertinent to patients and survivors. So, this month when a survivor shared her struggle with “chemobrain”, it seemed like something worth looking into. Chemobrain, also called chemofog, is something cancer survivors have described for decades, says cancer.gov. For months, or sometimes years after treatment, survivors find that they struggle with their memory, paying attention, and processing information. Labeled chemobrain because so many of the survivors had chemotherapy, the actual cause isn’t completely known. For many years, patients who complained about chemobrain were dismissed, but now, the condition is widely acknowledged by the medical community. The cognitive issues can be associated with treatment of many types of cancer, but much of the research is focused on breast cancer survivors. Studies have shown that 17 percent to 75 percent of breast cancer survivors showed varying forms of chemo brain from six month to 20 years after treatment. Further research is being done to understand why some do and some don’t get chemobrain and what actually causes the cognitive issues. Chemobrain is for real; survivors who struggle with it, know that for sure. More information about chemobrain can be found here, and a top ten list of what survivors want you to know about chemobrain can be found here.

Chemobrain isn’t the only thing survivors need to consider after treatment. They need to stay healthy to lower their risk of recurrence or of getting another form of cancer. According to cdc.gov, follow-up care as ordered by your doctor is critical, but so is making healthy choices. Healthy choices include quitting smoking and/or avoiding second-hand smoke, limiting alcohol consumption, protecting your skin, eating fruits and vegetables, maintaining a healthy weight, staying active, and getting a flu shot every year. More resources for healthy living after cancer can be found here.

Healthy living, research continues to show, is also critical in preventing cancer. Researchers have found a direct link between sugary drinks and the accelerated growth of tumors in colorectal cancer, reports medicalnewstoday.com. The research, done on mice, will need to be expanded before the findings can be applied to humans, but the research does suggest that consuming sugary drinks can reduce the time it takes for cancer to form. More about the study can be found here.

While you may not have been able to avoid it in the news, there is something else you might want to avoid in order to prevent cancer, reports komonews.com. A study shows that chemicals, found in the weed killer Roundup, increase the risk of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma by 41 percent. That makes the link between the weed killer and cancer stronger than was previously believed. The studies concerning Roundup and cancer continue, and more information can be found here.

There are some things about cancer that we may never understand, such as who will or won’t get chemobrain, but research continues to provide information about ways to prevent cancer, ways to live well after treatment, and ways to lower the risk of recurrence, and that is information that helps and empowers us all.

“The Future Is Here, It’s Just Not Evenly Distributed.”

Too often, healthcare outcomes on the ground level feel like a roll of the dice – there seems to be very little certainty about what’s going to happen, despite clinicians’ efforts to explain treatment options and patients’ attempts to understand what’s happening in the treatment process. The endless drumbeat of “scientific breakthrough” headlines of varying accuracy, or even veracity, adds even more of a casino-odds vibe to the experience of dealing with a challenging diagnosis like cancer or Parkinson’s.

The title of this post is an apocryphal quote attributed to cyberpunk writer William Gibson (his Twitter handle is @GreatDismal, and he’s definitely worth a follow) – it’s an aphorism I find myself using almost daily at this point, particularly when I’m participating in conversations, either in person or digital, about emerging trends in clinical research, clinical trials, and health system innovation. There are strong indications that healthcare, and the science that underpins it, is moving in a direction that will deliver up the “faster cures” that everyone affected by challenging or life-threatening conditions is anxiously awaiting.

Some of the signal I’m picking up comes from the scientific community itself, with organizations like Cochrane working to make science more accessible, and accurately reported, for everyone. Cochrane runs a rigorous systematic review process on clinical research studies and trials reporting, and has built a Consumer Network and a public-facing platform called Cochrane Crowd where anyone can become a citizen scientist (there’s a training program!) and then jump in to help assess and review clinical studies. I wrote an overview of Cochrane last year after attending the 2018 Cochrane Colloquium annual meeting in Edinburgh last September, which you can read here for a full 411 on all things Cochrane.

Another signal source for emerging indications of “future is here” is the increasing number of journal articles talking about making public engagement in research, and in healthcare system redesign and innovation, an actual thing vs. a “nice to have” or a box to check on a list from the marketing department. A recent example on that one is “Public engagement can fight against health inequalities—but only if we do it right” by Imran Khan, Head of Public Engagement at the Wellcome Trust, in The BMJ. Another example is a one day conference I attended recently, put together by the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI) and the US FDA, “Enhancing the Incorporation of Patient Perspectives in Clinical Trials.” I attend a lot of scientific and policy conferences and events, where I usually find myself grinding my teeth at the still-evident paternalism and “we’ve always done it this way” thinking that threads through medical science and health policymaking.

The CTTI/FDA event didn’t get my jaw clenched (much) – there were patients with lived experience and expertise on each panel at the event, with Donna Cryer, a lawyer and liver disease expert/advocate/activist, giving the opening keynote. Life sciences companies like Eli Lilly, Pfizer, and Takeda had representation, too, and all spoke clearly about the need for people/patients to be in on creating clinical trial protocol design that includes data release to study participants, and better research questions developed with patient input. On the revolutionary-thinking “future is here” front, there’s even an emerging idea of establishing clinical trial participant benefit trusts, where people who participate in drug trials are beneficiaries of trust funds established with stock options for drugs that are approved, and go to market. I’ll give you three guesses on who stepped up to the microphone in the Q&A session to talk about that idea [spoiler: yes, it was me].

My point is that the future is here, and it will be as evenly distributed as you, I, and the rest of the community at large – the public! – work to spread it around. The distribution network is us. Join Cochrane Consumer Network, start participating on Cochrane Crowd, spread the word on clinical trials that can benefit your community, and encourage your community to reach out to researchers at local universities and medical centers to offer to help design and launch clinical studies and trials that matter to the community itself. Citizen science isn’t just an idea, it’s jet fuel to get us to the future, faster.

5 Simple Habits To Promote A Healthier Lifestyle

We all know that life can throw us some curveballs…so one of the biggest questions many people have is, how do we maintain a healthy lifestyle while juggling everything else happening on a daily basis? The best answer is to form simple habits to incorporate into your everyday routine. This way you don’t have to worry about adding anything else to your day or changing your lifestyle — think of it this way… we’ll work smarter, not harder! Below, are 5 simple, and easy habits to form in order to promote a healthier lifestyle!

1. Create A Healthy Working Space

We spend hours a day working to benefit our careers or carry out a customers’ needs, but often times overlook our own personal needs. If you’re going to be glued to an office space or work computer, make it benefit not only your career goals, but your health goals too! Try adding a standing desk to your office, or swap out those pop-able munchies for a stash of healthy office snacks.

2. Drink Water With Every Meal

One of the easiest ways to maintain a healthy lifestyle and diet is to drink more water! Our bodies need and crave water to carry out basic functions throughout the day, and upping your water intake will result in numerous health benefits. From improving your hair and skin, to maintaining a healthy blood pressure and even losing weight, your body will surely thank you! Try replacing your go-to beverage with water during mealtimes and after just a few weeks you’ll be shocked at the results!

3. Sleep 7 – 9 Hours Each Night

Whether it’s stress, maintaining your social life, grief, or staying up to watch your latest Netflix binge, it’s very easy for life to get in the way of healthy sleeping patterns. However, giving your body a break and making consistent sleep (7- 9 hours each night) a priority is a MUST. A solution could be as easy as finding the best mattress to compliment your sleeping habits, or using natural remedies like meditation to relax before bed. Another tip for those having trouble sleeping, is to keep a strict sleeping schedule: Wake up and go to bed around the same time every night. That way, your body becomes used to this routine, and prepares you for sleep at the same time each night.

4. Drink Green Tea

Have you been searching for the fountain of youth? Well here’s a secret. One exists. In the form of Green Tea. Other than water, it’s the healthiest beverage out there. It’s packed with antioxidants that improve brain function, regulate metabolism, and ultimately keeps your body looking and feeling young! Bonus: Green Tea contains some caffeine, so instead of loading up on 4 cups of coffee to get you through the day, try replacing one or two cups with Green Tea.

5. Turn TV Time Into Exercise Time

Imagine this. You’re working late, you have to make dinner for your family, AND make sure you tune into Monday Night’s episode of The Bachelor before bed. Unfortunately, you didn’t have time to workout. Or so you thought… Here are a few simple workouts that you can perform in small spaces, such as your living room or bedroom during TV time and/or commercial breaks!

How Anxiety Impacts Sleep

Anxieties from the day can be inescapable by night. You can try so hard to sleep or to stay asleep, but worrisome thoughts cloud your mind and make it impossible to clear your mind enough to doze off. Issues like money, children, and work can seem overwhelming, where such anxiety-provoking topics develop into stress that causes your mind and body to stay awake. So what can you do?

Photo by Gregory Pappas on Unsplash

There are several comorbid factors to stress that can be problematic sources of your insomnia as well. Don’t let anxiety or these related matters control you though. Instead of trying to control the stressors in your life by thinking of them all the time, focus instead on what you can actually control:

Your Sleep Space

Photo by Brianna Santellan on Unsplash 

Make your bedroom a stress-free sanctuary. Keep your bedroom dark, quiet, and cool, and use it only for sex and sleep. Since you can’t completely control anxiety, eliminate any other threats to your sleep quality, such as what type of mattress you sleep on. Consider what would the right mattress feel like for you, based on your individual sleep preferences. Use a fan to drown out extra noise, and make sure your pillows are comfortable too. Turn any clock away from you so you don’t get stressed out by seeing it is very late, if you are still awake. If you don’t fall asleep in 15 minutes, leave your bedroom and do something relaxing in another room.

Your Routine

Photo by Brianna Santellan on Unsplash

 Establishing daily and nightly routines is key for regular sleep, even on the weekends. Block out seven to nine hours for sleep every night, and make sure you wake up at the same time on both weekdays and the weekend. Stop consuming nicotine, alcohol, or caffeine at least three hours before your set bedtime, and avoid working, watching TV, or using a handheld mobile device in bed right before you try to fall asleep. Make it habit to set aside 30 minutes prior to bed to read, listen to soft music, or meditate, so you can relax, clear your mind, and settle into your bed as a stress-free tranquil zone.

How You are Staying Active

Photo by Taylor Jacobs on Unsplash

 How active you are during the day impacts your sleep quality as well. Exercise is excellent for both physical and mental health, where exercising regularly helps you establish regular sleep patterns. You can take out your frustrations in exercise, where you leave the gym with a worry and frustration free head. Exercise also produces mood-enhancing endorphins – just remember to exercise only in the morning or afternoon, as those same endorphins will keep you up if you exercise right before bedtime. And your exercise doesn’t have to be major – even one brisk walk around your neighborhood each day has been demonstrated to help alleviate chronic insomnia. As exercise has been demonstrated to help you develop strength both physically and mentally, remember that mental health is a factor to also be considered when placing value and effort in improving your sleep life.

While increasing anxiety and decreasing sleep can seem like a never ending cycle, you can put an end to what feels so frustrating. By putting these principles and guidelines into practice, you are being proactive in making a difference for you. If you still have difficulty falling or staying asleep, reach out to family and friends for support, and consider seeing a therapist.

Medication Maintenance Tips for Caregivers

Managing medications can be difficult to do, especially if you’re a senior caregiver. Helping someone else remember to take medications on time and work to find the right balance for them can seem like a daunting task. Thankfully, we’ve got a list of tips and tricks to help make things flow more smoothly.

Make Sure Providers Are Aware Of Vitamins And Supplements

Medical providers should be aware of any vitamins and supplements a person is taking. Regardless of how natural they are, they can interfere with medications and other treatments. For example, someone on blood thinners should not be taking a supplement with vitamin K. Most blood thinners work by inhibiting the production of this vitamin in the body. Taking a vitamin K supplement can negate the work of blood thinners.

Instructions

Make sure to go over medication instructions with the senior you’re caring for. If they are able to, they should know the names of each medication along with dosages and what times to take them. It doesn’t hurt to type up instructions about medications so that all information is in one place and easy to access. Consider adding in what side effects they should seek help for. That can serve as a list for caregivers and seniors to check on in case of adverse events.

Alarms

Set alarms to remind seniors to take their medications. There are many options to choose from. Smartphones allow you to set up reminders with different sounds each time which can help people differentiate between medication doses and other alerts. Electronic personal assistants like Alexa or Google Home can easily be used for reminders as well. If the senior you’re caring for struggles with newer technology, consider a few alarm clocks around the home.

Keep A List

Keeping a list of medications can help seniors and caregivers alike remember what medications are due at what time. Lists that have both a visual of what the medications look like and allow people to check off a medication dose can be useful tools. If you’re going with this kind of list, make sure that you have multiple copies. Placing one next to a pill organizer and another on the fridge can help remind people to take medication before they’ve even missed a dose.

Smartphone apps can also be helpful in tracking this information.

Follow Up

It’s important not to just set alarms or reminders, but check in to ensure that someone has taken their medication. It can be easy to turn off an alarm and still forget to take medication as scheduled. Following up with the senior in your life can remind them that they didn’t take their most recent dose.

Store Medications Properly

Most medications do best when stored between 68 and 77 degrees Fahrenheit. Additionally, many of them need to avoid humidity, direct sunlight and more. Medications should not be stored in vehicles, on windowsills or other sunny and warm spots or even in the bathroom. Consider storing them in a cool, dry space in the kitchen or living space.

When medications aren’t stored properly, it can affect their potency and make them potentially dangerous. If you’re concerned that your senior’s medications have been affected, here’s what you need to watch out for:

  • Odd smells
  • Discolored pills, tablets and injections
  • Cracked or crumbled pills
  • Pills and tablets that are stuck together
  • Creams and ointments that show separation
  • Cloudy injections

If you see these signs, contact your senior’s pharmacist as soon as possible.

Sort Medications Into Pill Organizers

Set aside time each week to go through the medication your senior takes and place them into pill organizers. These can make it easier to remember to take medications as prescribed or even transport them while traveling. Some organizers can remind people to take their medications and even alert others that a dose has been missed.

Make Sure All Caregivers Know About Medications

A sure way to have seniors miss their medication doses is to have senior caregivers who aren’t on the same page. Without everyone being in the know, it becomes increasingly difficult to set reminders and follow up with seniors about medication doses.

Plan Ahead For Refill Needs

Refills may come up on days where a senior is alone. When that’s the case, they may forget or be unable to pick up their refilled medications. Refills may even be due when someone is planning to be out of town. Make sure to plan ahead adequately for refills and work with a person’s pharmacist.

Consider Compounding Medications If Needed

Compounding is a process where medication is tailored to a person’s specific needs. This can help remove any dyes a patient is allergic to or turn a pill into liquid for those who struggle with swallowing pills.

Get Tips from A Medical Provider

When methods to help your senior aren’t working as well as you had hoped, take some time to check in with their medical providers. Nurses have amassed a wealth of information on improving their patients’ quality of life. They are likely to have some ideas on how to make managing medications more effective.

Always Communicate With Family Members

Whatever steps you take to maintain a senior’s medication schedule, make sure that you’re communicating any difficulties with the senior’s loved ones. Family should also always be aware of any medication changes. When so many seniors rely on a variety of paid and family caregivers, it’s incredibly important for everyone to be in the loop on the storage, administration and organization of all medications, vitamins and supplements.

Spotlight On: International Women’s Day 2019

What Is International Women’s Day?

International Women’s Day (March 8th) is a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. The day also marks a call to action for accelerating gender parity.

International Women’s Day (IWD) has been observed since in the early 1900’s – a time of great expansion and turbulence in the industrialized world that saw booming population growth and the rise of radical ideologies. No one government, NGO, charity, corporation, academic institution, women’s network or media hub is solely responsible for International Women’s Day, but it works to bring those organizations together.

What Is The Theme?

#BalanceforBetter is this year’s theme – better the balance, better the world.

“Balance is not a women’s issue, it’s a business issue. The race is on for the gender-balanced boardroom, a gender-balanced government, gender-balanced media coverage, a gender-balance of employees, more gender-balance in wealth, gender-balanced sports coverage …

Gender balance is essential for economies and communities to thrive.” – International Women’s Day

What Can You Do?

This is a great day to:

  • Celebrate the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women
  • Raise awareness against bias
  • Take action for equality
  • Spread the IWD message on social media with #IWD2019 and strike the #BalanceforBetter pose

Why It’s Needed?

According to The Telegraph, a British newspaper, “The original aim – to achieve full gender equality for women the world – has still not been realised. A gender pay gap persists across the globe and women are still not present in equal numbers in business or politics. Figures show that globally, women’s education, health and violence towards women is still worse than that of men.” The World Economic Forum predicts the gender gap won’t close entirely until 2186. According to their 2017 report, it could still take another 100 years before the global equality gap between men and women disappears entirely.

This is too long to wait. So around the world, International Women’s Day provides an important opportunity for ground breaking action that can truly drive greater change for women.

Tips For A Smooth Recovery From Oral Surgery

An estimated 51,500 adults in the United States get diagnosed with oral and oropharyngeal cancers each year. Many of these people require oral surgery as part of their treatment. Oral surgery itself can present problems, such as damaging teeth and gums, causing pain and swelling. Dealing with these before and after surgery can help to speed up your recovery time and improve your comfort throughout, getting you back to life as soon as possible.

Caring for your teeth

Many cancer patients lose their appetite during treatment or struggle to eat after oral surgery. They are encouraged to have high calorie drinks for nutrients, but these often contain a lot of sugar and can be very damaging to teeth.Oral surgery for cancer can be done after doses of chemotherapy or radiation, which can weaken teeth and gums. If you have any teeth that are damaged or vulnerable you should consider having these extracted before surgery as bone necrosis can occur afterwards, particularly if you’ve had oral radiotherapy. Once you’ve recovered, lost and damaged teeth can be replaced with dentures or dental implants to give a natural look and feel, helping you to live a normal life again.

What you can eat after oral surgery

Your surgeon will offer you advice specific to you, but there are some basic guidelines you should follow. Once any bleeding stops and for the first two days post-op you can eat soft foods and liquids, such as yogurt, soups and smoothies. Include foods that are rich in vitamins A and C as these help to speed up recovery from surgery. A study from the National Institutes of Health gave patients 500-3,000 mg of vitamin C, which is 8-50 times higher than the RDA. All patients were recovering from various types of surgeries, including oral surgeries. They found that the high doses promoted new collagen synthesis, which helped wounds to heal faster. Research from the University of Michigan also found that high doses of vitamin C before surgery reduced the risk of excessive bleeding, so upping your intake before and after can be beneficial.

Dealing with pain and swelling

Unfortunately, after almost any oral surgery you will experience some pain, swelling and possible bruising. Many surgeons will advise you to regularly put ice on the area to reduce swelling, however recent research indicates that ice can stop the immune system’s natural response and actually delay healing. Ice can be a natural pain relief though, so if you choose to use it, apply it for 5 minutes at a time with 20 minute breaks in between as this is less likely to stop the body’s natural response. You’ll probably receive pain medication too, make sure you take this as instructed, even before pain occurs as it can prevent it.

Recovering from oral surgery can be painful, but it can also be a step in the right direction for your recovery, helping you to lead a normal and happy life. Pain and swelling are to be expected, and consuming soft foods and plenty of nutrients and minerals can help with this.

Everything You Need to Know About Dating with a Chronic Illness

If you live with a chronic illness like pulmonary fibrosis, diabetes or Crohn’s disease, your dating life is going to look a little different–and that’s okay. Being single and navigating the world of dating is challenging for everyone, but it can be especially difficult when your life comes with complications like needing to pack medication every time you leave home for more than a few hours.

Finding someone who shares your interests and who will support you through life’s ups and downs takes time, so be patient and have fun. Whether you choose dating sites, singles events, clubs or meetups, putting yourself out there will help you find that special person who will love you unconditionally–even on your worst days. If you are single with a chronic illness, follow these tips to make your dating journey a little easier.

Be Upfront About Your Illness

Deciding when to disclose your illness to a potential romantic connection is entirely up to you but consider telling them about it at the beginning of your interaction. It can be difficult to open up about something so personal to a stranger you don’t know and trust, but it can help you weed out people who aren’t worth your time. If someone isn’t going to accept all of you and love you the way you are, that person isn’t worth dating.

If you are anxious about discussing your illness with a date, why not use technology to your advantage? Tell them about it over an email, text message or phone call. People’s first reaction when they find out about your illness may be shock or discomfort, so allowing them time to unpack that information before you sit down for a date can help you both decide if moving forward is right. Plus, by the time you meet up, they’ll have had a chance to let it settle and come up with meaningful questions they have about your illness and how it affects your life. Being upfront is scary, but it’s an incredibly helpful dating tool.

Highlight Your Best Assets and Don’t Be a Victim

You’re going to be just as self-conscious on a first date as anyone, so practice the best piece of dating advice out there and play up your best assets! If your illness has caused some weight loss or weight gain, go shopping for an outfit that fits great and highlights your favorite body parts. Experiencing hair loss? Try a cool hat or an updo. Figure out what you love most about yourself and play up those areas while minimizing the things that make you feel self-conscious. Confidence looks hot on everyone.

People are going to follow your lead when it comes to your illness. The more relaxed you act about it, the better they will feel about it. If you are sad about it, they will feel sad about it. Lead by example and don’t walk around holding up a sign that says you’re a victim. You’ve got to love yourself before anyone else can love you–with or without a chronic illness.

Be Willing to Adapt

Things aren’t always going to go as planned, so adaptability is key to avoiding some of the frustrations of dating with a chronic illness. You might have just spent hours getting ready for a date and then realize you need a nap. That’s okay. Sometimes your significant other may want to do something your body won’t let you do. It’s going to be frustrating at first, even embarrassing. But once you and your partner learn that plans will sometimes change, you’ll see that it doesn’t need to affect your relationship negatively.

If you have dietary restrictions, consider alternatives to the dinner date. We tend to have it hard-wired into our brains how a date should look, but quality time can be spent in many ways. Do something outside, enjoy the arts, see a movie and pack your snacks from home. Who cares if your dating life looks a little different than it does in cheesy romantic comedies? Life happens and the more willing you are to adapt, the better you can love and be loved.

Don’t Overdo it and Laugh it Off if You Do

Adventure sports or extreme roller coasters might not be the best first date ideas if you live with a chronic illness. Don’t pretend like something is fine if it’s not. If you have a migraine, you’re not going to have fun at a rock concert, and if you are miserable, your date isn’t going to have fun either. It’s better to be upfront about how you are feeling and what you can do than try to tough it out and deal with the consequences later. Pretending isn’t fun and it’s not a good way to get to know someone.

When you do find yourself in a less-than-ideal situation, remember to laugh it off. You’re going to fall sometimes or need to sneak away to give yourself medication or treatment in an awkward way. Don’t take it too seriously. There are many circumstances you go through with a chronic illness that are silly and it’s best to laugh about them rather than make them a big deal.

 

Recognize When They Aren’t Worth Your Time

Some people just don’t have what it takes to handle someone’s health issue. Some people lack empathy or don’t have the willingness to nurture others. If someone is insensitive, rude, describes you as “difficult” or their lifestyle contradicts yours, you need to let them go. People who are worth your time and energy as a friend, let alone a potential romantic partner, will understand that you have good days and bad. They won’t ever fully understand what you go through, but they’ll want to try. They’ll be respectful, supportive and loving.

Remember You Are Worthy of Love

Don’t define yourself and your personality by your illness. You are a person, first and foremost, who happens to be sick. When you stop thinking of yourself as an illness, others will, too. You may have certain limits in life, but that doesn’t make you less worthy or capable of love. Not by a long shot.

 

Common Disabilities Faced By War Veterans

This infographic was provided by Disabled Vets to help spread awareness about the suffering that many of our veterans go through and share ways we can possibly help.