Notable News September 2021

September 2021 Notable News

A big yellow duck is raising awareness by having an adventure, researchers are becoming more aware of how cholesterol might affect cancer, and quitting smoking is always a good idea. A better breast cancer treatment and vaccines could be on the way for cancer patients, and fruit flies may be the key to longer lifespans.

Fruit Flies and Cancer

Researchers are learning a new anti-cancer strategy from studying fruit flies, reports technologynetworks.com. The research shows that, rather than trying to destroy tumors, treatments that attack destructive cancer chemicals could lead to improved health and survival rates. Researchers discovered that the tumors in fruit flies release a chemical, called interleukin-6 (IL-6), that weakens the barrier between the brain and the bloodstream and allows the bloodstream and brain environments to mix. The same chemical was found in mice and researchers were able to extend the lifespan of both the mice and the fruit flies by blocking the IL-6 impact on the blood-brain barrier. If researchers are able to find a drug that blocks the effect of IL-6 on the blood-brain barrier, it could potentially prolong the lives of cancer patients. Learn more about the fruit fly research here.

COVID-19 Booster Shot for Blood Cancer Patients

Some blood cancer patients could benefit from a Covid-19 booster shot, reports usnews.com. A study showed that more than half of the patients with B-cell blood cancers, who did not make antibodies after the first two Covid-19 vaccine shots, had a better result in making antibodies after the third booster shot. Blood cancer patients with questions about covid-19 vaccinations should consult their doctors. Get more information here.

Cancer Vaccines

Researchers have found some promising results studying the use of cancer vaccines, reports news.mit.edu. Experimental studies have helped to identify cancer proteins that, when vaccinated against, can potentially increase the body’s own immune response by waking up T cells to target the proteins. Over the past decade, scientists have been exploring cancer vaccines as a way for the body’s immune system to fight cancer. Learn more here

Breast Cancer Treatment

There is good news in breast cancer treatment, reports abcnews.go.com. New data shows that the drug ENHERTU worked better than the current treatment for HER-2 positive breast cancer, which is currently incurable. ENHERTU was more successful at reducing tumor size and keeping the patient alive longer. The results suggest that ENHERTU could become a first-line treatment for breast cancer and researchers are investigating to see if they have similar results using ENHERTU to treat other cancers such as stomach and lung cancers. Read more here

Lung Cancer and Smoking

It’s never too late to quit smoking, says cancer.gov. A new study shows that quitting smoking after being diagnosed with early-stage lung cancer could help people live longer and could also delay a return of the cancer. In the study, the people who quit smoking lived a median of 22 months longer than those who did not quit. Learn more about the findings here

There is also new information from cancer.gov about lung cancer among people with no history of smoking. A study has found that most of the tumors are caused by the mutations of natural processes in the body. The study also identified three subtypes of cancers among never smokers. The findings could help researchers develop better treatments for these types of lung cancer. Learn more here.

High Cholesterol and Cancer

Scientists are beginning to understand why there may be a link between high cholesterol and cancer, reports medicalnewstoday.com. Researchers have found that high cholesterol levels may help make cancer cells resistant to death. Using cell lines and mice models, researchers found that exposure to a derivative of cholesterol, known as 27HC, led to the growth of tumors and prevented the process of natural cell death in cancer cells. Understanding the link between cholesterol and cancer could lead to creating better cancer treatments. Find more information here.

Mr. Vanderquack

There are many ways to spread cancer awareness, but perhaps none more fun than a 20-inch duck in a Jeep traveling the country. The duck, Mr. Vanderquack, has a GPS tracker and is traveling to all 50 states in an effort to raise money for St. Jude Children’s Cancer Research, says wate.com. Thousands of Jeep owners have volunteered to drive Mr. Vanderquack around the country where he will visit over 650 cities. Mr. Vanderquack’s journey began in early September and is expected to take three months. You can follow the journey and sign up for email updates at mrvanderquack.com or on Instagram @mrvanderquack. Mr. Vanderquack’s adventure has already raised more than $20,000. Get more information here