Entries by Carol Preston

Impatient Patients

The recent ASH (American Society of Hematology) meeting in Orlando focused on a host of new therapies for blood cancers and possible combinations of these new drugs that could forge paths to cures. Leukemia, myeloma and lymphoma patients are grateful for the research and dedication from medical experts from around the globe.  But as I […]

How Do I Enroll in a Clinical Trial?

Oftentimes when we hear the word “cancer,” we hear nothing else. Our brains stop processing information. We think we’re going to die, that there is little or no time to weigh options and/or get our affairs in order. Fortunately, that last part the vast majority of the time isn’t true. We DON’T have to rush […]

Targeted Therapies: What does it all mean?

When my kids were little, I loved reading to them Arnold Lobel’s Frog and Toad books including “The Corner” in Frog and Toad All Year. In it, Frog assures Toad on a cold, rainy day that spring is just around the corner. Frog says that when he was younger, on a similar cold, rainy day, […]

Better Patient Access to HealthCare: Round Table Discussion Takeaway

I represented the Patient Empowerment Network at Patient Access Network (PAN)’s 10th birthday bash in Washington, DC On October 22nd. Not the cake and candles kind, but rather, a full day Roundtable to talk about…what else…health care. PAN’s goal to collect and collate information on how four key groups – (1) patients, (2) health care […]

A Tribute to AJ Halavacs

  AJ Halavacs of Fort Lauderdale, FL died unexpectedly earlier this month. Since learning of his death a few days ago, I have been shaken to my core. I had met AJ only briefly on April 12 at Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, FL. But what an impression he made! With his big personality and […]

Can(cer) Do! – Why We Should Talk About Cancer

I saw two productions about cancer in a 48-hour period this weekend…and went home smiling. The first, produced at Washington, DC’s Theatre J, was called The Prostate Dialogues. It was written and acted by a very fine local raconteur, Jon Spellman. In 75 minutes – with no break – John unfurled his prostate cancer story […]