Entries by Casey Quinlan

Finding the Funny When the Diagnosis Isn’t

It’s not easy hearing your name and [insert dread diagnosis here]. I know this only too well after having to find the funny in my own journey through cancer. Cancer is, however, most often a diagnosis that you fight to a defined end. What’s it like to find the funny in a chronic condition like […]

All I Want For Christmas Is Customer Service at My Doctor’s Office

I have this crazy dream. It’s about how, when I make an appointment to see my doctor – my primary care physician, my radiologist, my orthopedist, my whatever-ologist – the process is easy, honors my time as much as it does my doctor’s, and winds up running smoothly for both sides of the transaction. The […]

Molecular Profiling, Cancer, and You

When you get a cancer diagnosis, your doctor might, or might not, bring up the topic of molecular profiling. If s/he doesn’t, you definitely want to bring it up yourself, and here’s why: the results of that molecular profiling can significantly impact your cancer treatment options. The conversations about this topic that I have been […]

The Biggest Question No One Is Asking in Healthcare

There is a really big question in healthcare, one that could shift the entire industry toward more patient-focused care while simultaneously driving down healthcare costs. Very few people even think about this question. In my experience even fewer, if any, of those who do ask it are involved in developing healthcare policy at the federal […]

Reinventing the Clinical Trial: Start at Ground Level

If each of us humans is a snowflake, unique in our genomic makeup, where’s my snowflake medicine? I asked that question from the platform at the ePharma Summit in New York in 2013, and have yet to get an answer. The challenge for the bioscience industry is, I believe, the classic randomized clinical trial. That […]

Talking To Your Family About Clinical Trial Decisions

Hearing your name and the word “cancer” in the same sentence is a world-shaking moment. After getting a cancer diagnosis, telling your family about it is another big step, one that can be fraught with as much emotion as hearing that diagnosis yourself. Once the emotional dust has settled, talking with your family about treatment […]

Health Insurance and Cancer: Your Mileage (and Coverage) May Vary

Financial toxicity is the phrase used to describe the impact of the cost of treatment on patients. The NIH describes financial toxicity as “problems a patient has related to the cost of treatment.” No matter what kind of health coverage plan you have, if you get a cancer diagnosis you’ll quickly discover all the things […]

Show Me the Evidence

A habit of basing convictions upon evidence, and of giving to them only that degree or certainty which the evidence warrants, would, if it became general, cure most of the ills from which the world suffers. ~ Bertrand Russell  If you follow science and medicine headlines – which I do – you’ll find yourself wondering […]

Patient-Centered Research: Is That a Thing?

Medical care is based on research. That was true in the time of Hippocrates, and it’s true in our 21st century lives. The scientific questioning that leads people to start experimenting and investigating something is as old as human intelligence – we’re a curious species, always trying to figure out the “why” on pretty much […]

Talking to Your Oncologist About Clinical Trials

You’ve gotten a cancer diagnosis. You’ve selected an oncologist as your partner, working toward “No Evidence of Disease,” or NED (NED is every cancer patient’s very best friend). Your and your oncologist are working up a treatment plan, and you want to talk about clinical trials as part of that plan. Should you kick off […]

Can we talk? It’s important.

“Tis impossible to be sure of any thing but Death and Taxes,” ~ Christopher Bullock, “The Cobbler of Preston” With tax day coming up on April 15, most of us are focused on the second thing mentioned in that quote. Taxes are discussed freely – sometimes at volume! – in many social and community settings, […]

To Open-Kimono, or Not to open-Kimono? That is the Question.

“Enthusiasm for a cause sometimes warps judgment.” – William Howard Taft When someone finds themselves on the receiving end of a diagnosis for something like cancer, the first thing they want is information. After that, they want someone to talk over that information with who will help them process it. As much as the shared […]

(Self)Knowledge = (Em)Power(ment)

“Promise me you’ll always remember: You’re braver than you believe, and stronger than you seem, and smarter than you think.” – A. A. Milne Finding yourself sitting on an exam table, or lying in a hospital bed, can be scary. Annual well-check visits to your primary care doc are one thing, but if one of […]

A How-To On Reading Scientific Papers

“Be skeptical. But when you get proof, accept proof.” – Michael Specter That quote is from Denialism: How Irrational Thinking Hinders Scientific Progress, Harms the Planet, and Threatens Our Lives, where New Yorker staff writer Michael Specter examined the distrust of science that’s turned discussion of scientific topics into a potential minefield. Some good examples […]

Storytelling and Medicine

“Tell me a story.” That’s something that any adult who’s spent time in the company of kids will have heard. Stories are how humans connect with, and make sense of the world, in childhood and beyond. Storytelling is how people communicate. “Here’s who was there, here’s what we did, here’s how we felt, and here’s […]