ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA (AML) Archives

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a fast-growing form of cancer of the blood and bone marrow. AML is the most common type of acute leukemia and occurs when the bone marrow begins to make blasts, cells that have not yet completely matured.

Heading Off Cancer Growth on the Cellular Level

Cancer cells are like all the cells in our body, in that they need certain basic building blocks – amino acids – in order to reproduce. There are 20 amino acids found in nature. The amino acid serine is often found in abundance in patients with certain types of breast cancer, lung cancer, and melanoma. The overproduction of this amino acid is often required for the rapid and unregulated growth characteristic of cancer.

Scientists at the Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) wondered if there was a way to take advantage of the relationship between cancer cell proliferation and serine. Amy GrayThey examined a large library of molecules -numbering 800,000 – to find an enzyme that inhibited serine production. After much research, the group found 408 contenders that could possibly work. This list was again narrowed down to a smaller set of seven, ending with one promising candidate. This molecule, 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH), seemed to inhibit the first step in a cancer cell’s use of serine to reproduce itself.

Luke L. Lairson, assistant professor of chemistry at TSRI and principal investigator of cell biology at the California Institute for Biomedical Research remarked, “In addition to discovering an inhibitor that targets cancer metabolism, we also now have a tool to help answer interesting questions about serine metabolism.”

What does this mean for cancer patients in the future?

Discovering an enzyme that inhibits serine production means that a key process in cancer cell proliferation can be slowed down or even stopped.   Interfering with cancer cell metabolism could be a pathway to treatment. Potentially, adding the molecule PHGDH to cancer cells disturbs the basic need of cancer cells to divide and reproduce rapidly. Obviously this finding points to years of further research and drug development. But discovering this key relationship between serine over-production and a molecule that slows it down could be a model for new cancer treatments in the future.

 

References:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3989988/

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2016-03-team-approach-curbing-cancer-cell.html

Shared Decision Making: Putting the Patient At The Center of Medical Care

“Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn” – Benjamin Franklin

As gravity shifts away from health care providers as the sole keeper of medical information, the importance of sharing decisions, as opposed to clinicians making decisions on behalf of patients, has been increasingly recognized. Shared decision- making (SDM) is the conversation that happens between a patient and clinician to reach a healthcare choice together. Examples include decisions about surgery, medications, self-management, and screening and diagnostic tests. While the process commonly involves a clinician and patient, other members of the health care team or friends and family members may also be invited to participate. The clinician provides current, evidence-based information about treatment options, describing their risks and benefits; and the patient expresses his or her preferences and values. It is thus a communication approach that seeks to balance clinician expertise with patient preference.

Dr Mohsin Choudry describes shared decision-making as “a way of transforming the conversation between doctors and their patients so that the thoughts, concerns and especially the preferences of individuals are placed more equally alongside the clinician’s expertise, experience and skills.” Before physicians can really know what the proper treatment is for a patient, they must understand the particular needs of their patients. This approach recognises that clinicians and patients bring different but equally important forms of expertise to the decision-making process. The clinician’s expertise is based on knowledge of the disease, likely prognosis, tests and treatment; patients are experts on how a disease impacts their daily life, and their values and preferences. For some medical decisions, there is one clearly superior treatment path (for example, acute appendicitis necessitates surgery); but for many decisions there is more than one option in which attendant risks and benefits need to be assessed. In these cases the patient’s own priorities are important in reaching a treatment decision. Patients may hold a view that one treatment option fits their lifestyle better than another. This view may be different from the clinician’s.  Shared decision-making recognises a patient’s right to make these decisions, ensuring they are fully informed about the options they face. In its definition of shared decision-making, the Informed Medical Decisions Foundation ,  a non-profit that promotes evidence-based shared decision-making, describes the model as “honoring both the provider’s expert knowledge and the patient’s right to be fully informed of all care options and the potential harms and benefits. This process provides patients with the support they need to make the best individualized care decisions, while allowing providers to feel confident in the care they prescribe.”

By explicitly recognising a patient’s right to make decisions about their care, SDM can help ensure that care is truly patient-centered. In Making Shared Decision-Making A Reality: No Decision About Me Without Me, the authors recommend that shared decision-making in the context of a clinical consultation should:

  • support patients to articulate their understanding of their condition and of what they hope treatment (or self-management support) will achieve;
  • inform patients about their condition, about the treatment or support options available, and about the benefits and risks of each;
  • ensure that patients and clinicians arrive at a decision based on mutual understanding of this information;
  • record and implement the decision reached.Screen Shot 2015-10-29 at 4.43.27 AM

The most important attribute of patient-centered care is the active engagement of patients in decisions about their care.
“No decision about me, without me” can only be realised by involving patients fully in their own care, with decisions made in partnership with clinicians, rather than by clinicians alone. This has been endorsed by the Salzburg Statement on Shared Decision Making, authored by 58 representatives from 18 countries, which states that clinicians have an ethical imperative to share important decisions with patients. Clinical encounters should always include a two-way flow of information, allowing patients to ask questions, explain their circumstances and express their preferences. Clinicians must provide high quality information, tailored to the patient’s needs and they should allow patients sufficient time to consider their options. Similarly, in Shared Decision Making: A Model for Clinical Practice, the authors argue that achieving shared decision-making depends on building a good relationship in the clinical encounter so that patients, carers and clinicians work together, in equal partnership, to make decisions and agree a care plan. According to the Mayo Clinic Shared Decision Making National Resource Center, this model involves “developing a partnership based on empathy, exchanging information about the available options, deliberating while considering the potential consequences of each one, and making a decision by consensus.” Good communication can help to build rapport, respect and trust between patients and health professionals and it is especially important when decisions are being made about treatment.

Decision Aids

One of the most important requirements for decision-making is information. There are a number of tools available to support the process such as information sheets, DVDs, interactive websites, cates plots or options grids. Decision aids that are based on research evidence are designed to show information about different options and help patients reach an informed choice. The Mayo Clinic has been developing its own decision aids since 2005 and distributing them free of charge to other health care providers. For instance, Mayo’s Diabetes Medication Choice Decision Aid helps patients choose among the six medications commonly used to treat type-2 diabetes. Patients choose the issues that are most important to them, for example, blood sugar control or method of administration —and then work with their physicians to make comparisons among the drugs, based on the chosen criterion.

Discussing their options and preferences with health professionals enables patients to understand their choices better and feel they have made a decision which is right for them. Research studies have found that people who take part in decisions have better health outcomes (such as controlled high blood pressure) and are more likely to stick to a treatment plan, than those who do not.  A 2012 Cochrane review of 86 randomized trials found that patients who use decision aids improve their knowledge of their treatment options, have more accurate expectations of the potential benefits and risks, reach choices that accord with their values, and more actively participate in decision making. Instead of elective surgery, patients using decision aids opt for conservative options more often than those not using decision aids.

Barriers to Shared Decision-Making

Barriers to shared decision-making include poor communication, for example doctors using medical terminology which is incomprehensible to patients; lack of information and low health literacy levels. It is worth noting that not everyone wants to be involved in shared decision making with their doctors; and not every doctor wants to take the time. Some patients come from cultural backgrounds that lack a tradition of individuals making autonomous decisions. Some health professionals may think they are engaged in shared decision-making even when they are not.

Shared Decision-Making – An Ethical Imperative

With this proviso in mind, it is nevertheless clear that the tide is turning toward more active patient participation in decisions about health care. Research has shown that when patients know they have options for the best treatment, screening test, or diagnostic procedure, most of them will want to participate with their clinicians in making the choice. A systematic review of patient preferences for shared decision making indicates 71% of patients in studies after 2000 preferred sharing decision roles, compared to 50% of studies before 2000.  The most important reason for practising shared decision-making is that it is the right thing to do. The Salzburg Statement goes so far as to say it is an ethical imperative and failure to facilitate shared decision-making in the clinical encounter should be taken as evidence of poor quality care. Evidence for the benefits of shared decision-making is mounting. Providing patients with current, evidence-based information, relevant decision aids and giving them time to explore their options and work through their concerns, will help patients choose a treatment route which best suits their needs and preferences, and ultimately lead to better health outcomes for all.

Building A Digital Ladder Of Engagement

Building A Digital Ladder Of Engagement

In my previous articles, I have written about using social media to connect with other patients and advocates, communicate with health care professionals, and access information to help make more informed choices about our own and our loved ones’ care. I am a passionate believer in the transformative potential of social media in healthcare, but I am also aware that each of us has differing levels of digital skills. Whether you are taking your first steps on the ladder of digital engagement, or you have reached the top, digital literacy is an important skill in your patient empowerment toolkit.

This article is for those of you who want to climb further up the ladder to become more digitally savvy with social media. And for those of you who have already reached the top, before you click away from the article believing this isn’t for you, please stop a moment. Think back to when you took your first step on that ladder. Remember the day you sent your first tweet, wrote your first blog post or asked a question in a Facebook group? Were you encouraged and supported in taking the next step in digital engagement? Was it a steep learning curve? Or was there someone to reach out a hand to help you climb the next step? If we are to truly call ourselves patient advocates, isn’t part of our role to help bridge the digital divide for all patients? I want to encourage you to think about how we might work together to extend a helping hand to those patients and their carers who are just starting out online.

What is Digital Health Literacy?

Digital health literacy is the ability to use information and communication technologies to find, evaluate, create, and communicate health information. It builds upon a foundation of health literacy, which is the degree to which individuals have the capacity to access, understand and use information in ways that enhance health. Reading these two definitions, it becomes immediately clear that those who have limited skills in either area are at a critical disadvantage when it comes to managing their own and their family’s health. Giving people access to relevant health information – and support in using that information – will help individuals make more informed decisions about their health care. Increasingly access to information and support is to be found online.

First Steps

If you are new to patient advocacy what first steps should you take to get up to speed? A good place to start is by gaining a better understanding of what it means to be an empowered patient. The Patient Empowerment Network has recently teamed up with Intake.Me to bring you their ePatient courses. These virtual classrooms are designed to help patients take those first steps on the path of patient engagement and advocacy. Follow this link to take the first two classes and be sure to check in regularly for more classes.

App icons on white cloud with smart tablet and ladderWhen you are ready to take your next step on the digital ladder, it’s time to join a social media site. Social media encompasses social networking sites (such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn), blogs, wikis, video and photo sharing sites (such as Flickr, Pinterest, Instagram, YouTube), social bookmarking sites (Reddit, Digg), online communities, and user-generated content sites. With so many channels to choose from it might seem overwhelming at first to know where to begin, but as with any new skill start small and you will build up your expertise with time. Facebook and Twitter are the two of the most popular channels for healthcare conversations. You may already have your own account on these platforms, but if you haven’t it is very easy to set one up. Simply go to www.facebook.com and https://twitter.com/signup to sign up. Both have helpful step-by-step instructions to guide you through the process and at any time you can simply click on the “Help” button if you get stuck.

Facebook

On Facebook you can connect with other patient advocates and join Facebook groups related to your disease or condition. Many organizations have a Facebook presence and by liking their Facebook page you can keep informed of their activities and find other patients to connect with. As Facebook is a public platform and everything you post there can be viewed by a public audience, it’s important to consider the level of privacy you are comfortable with. You can adjust your privacy settings in Facebook at any time so your posts are visible to an audience of your choosing; for example “friends only”; “friends of friends”; or “public”. If you decide to set up your own page or group for your cause, you can easily do this in Facebook. Visit www.facebook.com/pages/create for instructions.

Twitter

While Facebook groups and pages are useful resources for patients, Twitter takes the healthcare conversation to another level. Think of it as a digital town square. Here you have a greater mix of patients, physicians, healthcare professionals, medical researchers, and the public all coming together in one virtual space to discuss healthcare matters.

Your Twitter profile is the first place someone will look when they go to your profile. If they find only a default Twitter picture and no bio details, your advocacy credentials may be called into question. Complete your profile by adding your name, a picture, and some brief details about your advocacy work so people can learn more about you.  It’s a good idea to listen first before leaping into the Twitter fray. This is true for any new community, whether virtual or in real life. This way you can understand the normative interactions existing on the platform. You don’t even have to tweet to learn from Twitter; there is a lot to learn from just following the right people but your experience will be richer if you join in with others in their conversations. If you are not sure what you should tweet, try something simple like introducing yourself, @mention someone you already know on Twitter, or retweet (RT) something that will be helpful to your followers to get your first conversations started.

Find People To Follow On Twitter

Start by following the Twitter accounts of organizations and groups related to your disease or interest. Go to their website and click on the Twitter follow button if they have one. Twitter will also populate your account with suggestions of similar groups and individuals on Twitter. Pretty soon you will have built a list of relevant accounts to follow. It’s a good idea to organize these accounts into lists; e.g. “organizations”, “researchers”; “patient advocates”; “hospitals”. You can create your own lists or subscribe to lists created by others (here’s a list of patient advocates on Twitter which I created). Find people who can serve as online role models for you. If you are already a seasoned Twitter user, reach out to someone new and offer to mentor and guide them.

How To Find Health Related Conversations On Twitter

(1) Advanced Search

The easiest way to find conversations of interest is to click the native search facility at the top of your Twitter screen and enter your keyword – for example “diabetes”. You then have a further option of performing an Advanced Search. This allows you to narrow down your search using parameters such as specific keywords, language, people, location, and date range.

(2) Hashtags

A hashtag is simply a keyword preceded by the #symbol. Hashtags create a hyperlink which will bring up every public update tagged with the same hashtag keyword. To create a hashtag, simply place # before a word; e.g. #diabetes. Familiarize yourself with the relevant hashtags related to your topic of interest. Hashtags are a useful way to search for health related topics and organize conversations around a keyword topic.

(3) Twitter Chat

A Twitter Chat is a public Twitter conversation around one unique hashtag. This hashtag allows you to follow the discussion and participate in it. Twitter chats can be one-off events, but more usually are recurring weekly chats to regularly connect people. The chat will be hosted and the host will ask questions along the way to stimulate discussion and sharing of ideas. There are chats for most disease topics and a full list can be found by searching the database of the Healthcare Hashtag Project. This is also a useful resource to find Twitter users to follow. In addition you will find past transcripts of chats on the website so you can familiarize yourself with the chat and its norms before taking part.

When you are ready to join in a chat, login to your Twitter account at the specified time and search for the relevant # (e.g. #diabeteschat). You don’t have to tweet; you can just follow the conversation, especially if you are still getting used to tweet chats, but do introduce yourself and mention that you are new to the chat. Twitter chats can be quite fast-paced and you may feel as if you aren’t keeping up with every tweet. Don’t worry. You can always catch up at your own pace later by reading the chat transcript available after the chat has finished. You can also use a “chat-room” tool, such as TweetChat to help you focus solely on the chat – only tweets with the hashtag will appear on your screen so you can filter out any other twitter conversations not related to the chat.

(4) Conference Live-Tweeting

Twitter is fantastic for taking the content of conferences beyond the walls of a conference venue. It is becoming more popular for conference organizers and attendees to “live-tweet” sessions directly from the conference. You can follow along on Twitter using the conference hashtag. Many conferences register their hashtag with the Healthcare Hashtag Project or include the hashtag on their conference website.

These are just some of the many ways in which your patient advocacy can be enhanced through social media. If you have been hesitant or unsure where to start, I encourage you to take that first step by setting up an account on Twitter or Facebook. Don’t be afraid to reach out to others for help along the way.

A Rising Tide

The aphorism “a rising tide lifts all boats” was first used by President John F Kennedy in a speech to describe the idea that when an economy is performing well, all people will benefit from it. This wisdom can equally be applied to the empowered patient movement. One of the ways in which we lift each other up is through strengthening our connections online. So ask yourself, who will you lift up today?

5 Simple Steps to Become a Twitter Pro

When it comes to using Social Media, especially twitter, there is no need to worry. It is a lot easier than you think. If you follow these 5 simple steps, you can become a twitter professional in no time.

1) Create an Account

Go to www.twitter.com, and create a free account by clicking the ‘Sign Up’ button in the top right of the page. Enter your name, phone number or email, and password in the space provided. Then, chose a user name which will become your twitter handle. (See definitions below.)

2) Finish Your  Profile

  • After you have created your account, you will be prompted to add your areas of interest. The areas you choose will then be complied into suggestions for whom you could follow. You may either choose to follow all, some, or none of these accounts.
  • Next, you can upload a photo of yourself to your profile.
  • Afterwards, ‘People you may know’ appear as more suggestions for people to follow. This list is compiled from contacts from your email or phone address book.

3) Learn the Twitter Lingo

  • Follower – You “follow” other users to see their updates on your home page, and they can follow you to see yours.
  • Handle – A “handle” is your twitter username. This is the name people will identify you as. (Example: @power4patients)
  • Hashtag(#) – A “hashtag” is used in front of keywords to provide context, and to make them easily searchable for people looking for information on a specific topic. (Example: #PowerfulPatients)
  • Mentions(@) – You use the “@” sign directly in front of someone’s user name/handle to direct your tweet towards them. It will also appear in their “@Mentions” section on their Twitter account. (Example: Hey! @power4patients check this out!)
  • Retweet (RT) – When you come across a tweet you like and want to share with your followers, you can click the “retweet” button
  • Tweet – A tweet is the message you send out to your followers. Each tweet must be 140 characters or less
  • Tweetchats – Tweetchats are arranged meetings often occurring regularly on a specific time/date. A moderator oversees the conversation and focuses it on a specific topic. You can follow these chats or participate by searching or tweeting with the designated hashtag.
  • Reply – A reply is a response to another user’s Tweet that begins with the @username of the person you’re replying to. You can reply by clicking the Reply button on a Tweet.
  • Like – Likes are represented by a small heart. They are commonly used to show appreciation for a Tweet. You can see someone’s likes by visiting their profile, and your likes are also visible on your profile.

4) Composing Your First Tweet

A tweet may contain photos, videos, links, and up to 140 characters of text. You begin by clicking the icon button or typing directly into the ‘What’s happening?’ text bar. Don’t forget to use hashtags (#) to provide context or mentions (@) if you directing a tweet towards someone.

You can also shares articles you find on your favorite sites, such as New York Times by clicking on the Twitter icon. (See example below.) When you click the icon, a tweet will automatically generate making it easy to share with your followers.

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5) Search

Using the ‘Search Twitter’ feature in the top right of your homepage (See image.) allows you to look for specific tweets, users, or ongoing conversations.

Screen Shot 2016-02-19 at 12.24.26 PM

References

www.sproutsocial.com/insights/twitter-term-definitions

www.support.twitter.com

Coping With Anxiety and Depression

An expert panel discusses different methods to cope with anxiety and depression through all the phases of a cancer journey. Jane Williams, MSN, RN, FNP, says one of the best ways is to communicate openly with your healthcare team and loved ones. Letting them know how you feel and what you need can lead to you feeling better. Remember that you’re not alone in your journey, and sharing your emotions can help you figure out what works best for you, whether that be running, meditating, etc. Watch the full video below for all the panel’s advice on coping with anxiety and depression.

Coping With Anxiety and Depression from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

An Ounce of Prevention is Worth a Pound of Cure

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. It creates a sense of awareness and provides a window of opportunity for you. Sometimes it is a matter of accountability and sometimes it is about breaking old patterns.

Gina

Gina Costa-Goldfarb

When my father was diagnosed with heart disease many years ago, we started eating and cooking differently. That didn’t change my dad’s ways and he ultimately died of heart disease at 62 years old. I remember he used to eat and drink things that weren’t good for him and joke about it with me and then say: “Don’t tell mommy.” That was his choice. I made a different choice long before his passing to eat healthier. If I did eat things that weren’t healthy, my body sent signals to me that these foods weren’t acceptable to me anymore.

When my mom was in treatment for ovarian cancer I found myself in Medical Libraries looking for clinical trials that would save her. When she passed it was a catalyst for me to look into prevention for my own health. I went for genetic testing at NYU Medical Center. While I don’t carry the gene for breast cancer, I have to be cautious because of the history of cancer in my family. I diligently pursued my annual gynecologist exams and additional ovary scans and blood work. Additionally, I followed up with my 6-12 month mammograms.

The result of my taking my own action on proactivity toward prevention was a diagnosis of stage 1 invasive lobular breast cancer. To take it a step further, I was originally advised by my breast surgeon to only have one breast removed. I followed my intuition and chose a double mastectomy and that resulted in even more prevention. When my surgery was completed, I was told that the other breast was pre-cancerous. If I hadn’t been my own best advocate, I would have found myself in the same shoes at another time.

Since I was diagnosed at an early stage my Oncotype couldn’t justify chemo treatment either way, but I remain on Tamoxifen therapy for probably another seven years.

I have also been discussing ovary obliteration with my oncologist and another specialist because of my lineage of cancer. In all likelihood, I will have my ovaries removed sometime this year.

When I finished treatment for breast cancer and had reconstruction surgeries, I thought to myself: “Now what? Hmmm, I have focused for a year and a half on my breasts, now it’s time to get back to the taking care of my other body parts and I got back on schedule with my dentist, gynecologist and internist all in the name of self-care and prevention as I lead my busy life balancing career, family, fun and connection with others. I knew that if I didn’t exercise extreme self-care, I would be much good to others.

About a week ago, I am finished up 4 and 5 of Moh’s surgeries to remove skin cancers from my body. In order practice prevention, we have to know our bodies, face fear and get checked out.

In some cases, I do know that even prevention is not a cure, because my mother was one who religiously (not in a hypochondria mode) went to all of her doctors’ appointments, pap smears, etc., and still she was diagnosed with late stage ovarian cancer. The bottom line is prevention cannot hurt us like lacking in self-love will.

So….., what can YOU do to take an active part in your health? What does practicing prevention look like to you? It could be something as simple as changing your diet or scheduling doctor’s appointments that we hesitate to make because we are always caring for someone else. It could also be taking care of yourself in terms of mind and spirit and working on stress reduction? In what ways can you reduce stress and overload in your life?

This blog is being shared to create awareness and remove fear. Know your body! You are the only one who does. Practice prevention and self-care. Put yourself first so that you can be around to care for others. That is my message and my gift to you on this beautiful day!

If you need help in this area or any other area of your cancer experience, reach out to me gina@newbeginningswithgina.com or visit my website: www.newbeginningswithgina.com.

I look forward to hearing from you!

Xo Gina

Social Media in Hematology

Interview With Dr. Laura C. Michaelis (@lauracmichaelis), MD Clinician and Clinical Researcher at the Medical College of Wisconsin

In an interview with Dr. Laura Michaelis, she discusses how social media can be great tool to connect with other patients with the same disease.  Dr. Michaelis says social media has really revolutionized the way patients to patients, patients to doctors, and doctors to patients are communicating. Watch the full video below to hear the multitude of ways social media can benefit patients and doctors.

Social Media in Hematology from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

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Andrew Schorr:

I just want to get a show of hands of something for a second. How many of you go on the internet to find information for your MPN? Most everybody. Okay. And one other one. How many of you have connected with other patients, like in social media where you’re somehow part of a discussion? Okay. I just want to talk about it and I know that actually Dr. Michaelis, you actually encourage people. This whole connection, Patient to Patient, you’re a big fan of.

Dr. Michaelis:  

Oh yes, absolutely. I actually think social media has really revolutionized the way that patient to patient communication happens, patient to doctor communication happens.

And doctor to patient communication happens. There’s actually a nice paper published out of MD Anderson recently that looked at hematologists and social media Twitter accounts and how people communicate that way. There’s going to be a talk at our national meeting, the American Society of Hematologists, teaching doctors how to use Twitter and use social media not only to talk to one another, but also to talk to patients and also move policy change; policy in certain conditions.

I know a lot of patients who have Facebook groups where they communicate with one another. That can be an invaluable source not only of information but also comradery to take the loneliness out of having a very rare disease where you don’t feel like anybody else knows what you’re going through. We’ve had little town meetings via Twitter where people share information or get communication that way.

I think the sky’s the limit the way that technology is going and how we really branch out from being in our own institutions and just talking to one another within that institution about caring for patients or moving the disease forward. And now we’re looking at a whole different level of communication.

Andrew:   

I’ll mention just a couple of resources for you. So first of all, if you happen to be in the PRM-151 trial, this is the queen of a Facebook group for that. And what’s been happening now is on Facebook, if you’re familiar with it, some people are forming pages and groups around the trial they’re in. it’s not the drug company; it’s not even the clinic. It’s the patients actually in the trial. It’s kind of cool, isn’t it? Yeah, it really is. And then a couple of other resources.

There’s one that started in England and is proliferating around the world called HealthUnlocked.com. The folks from England with MPNs, which was started by a peer of theirs, Dr. Claire Harrison in London, she helped working with patients start a group called MPN Voice.

Dr. Michaelis:   

Yes, one other thing. I would also recommend there is a national resource called ClinicalTrials.gov. This is available online. This is a completely updated list of clinical trials and you can search it by location or by center.

So if you’re getting your care in Akron, you can look at what clinical trials are available in Ohio, or what clinical trials are available 250 miles from me. And then you can search down by myelofibrosis or PV, etc. So I think that and the clinicaltrials.gov and the NCI also have good information on that.

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Barriers to Clinical Trial Accrual

Interview With Dr. Michael Thompson (@MTMDPhD), Medical Director, Early Phase Cancer Research Program, University of Wisconsin

9 1/2 year CLL patient Carol Preston interviews Dr. Michael Thompson about some of the barriers to clinical trial accrual and how healthcare professionals might overcome them. Today, there is only about 3-5% of adult patients enrolled in clinical trials versus the 60% in pediatrics. Why is that? Watch the video below to find out.

Barriers to Clinical Trial Accrual from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

How to Develop a Personal “Medical Résumé”

When people are applying for jobs, they develop a résumé. This document has all the important details regarding their work history, education, etc. Patients need a résumé too! However, patient résumés are different. Employment résumés are created to get great jobs; medical résumés are created to acquire great healthcare experiences.

In early 2007, my mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease. My mother also had many other medical issues, including diabetes, hypertension, colon cancer and atrial fibrillation. My mother was on many medications and saw many different doctors from various health systems. It was challenging managing my mother’s care, until I developed two pieces of paper that changed everything! I created the “medical résumé.”

According to the Joint Commission, the organization that accredits healthcare organizations, the biggest cause of medical errors is botched handoffs. A handoff is a transition of care, such as going from a hospital to a rehab center. Patients could play a vital role in ensuring safe handoffs via the medical résumé. My mother experienced many handoffs, and I was able to avert many errors through the medical résumé. After my mother was handed off, I would always review my mother’s pertinent medical history and provide a copy of her medical résumé. I lost track of how many times I heard this statement, “This is a life-saving tool. I wish all patients had a medical résumé!” Healthcare organizations have volumes of information on each patient. The medical résumé helps them quickly see all the most important details.

Develop your medical résumé in the form of an electronic file. This can be accomplished easily via a word processing system. The information can be simply updated at any time. Always keep in mind the golden rule of electronic files, have a backup copy!

Below are some suggested items to include in your medical résumé. A medical résumé looks exactly like an employment résumé! I developed the look of my medical résumé based on the appearance of my business résumé. Have major headings with bullet points; just like this article! You want to make it very easy for professionals to quickly and accurately review your information. It may seem like a challenge to include all this information on just two pages. However, you’ll be very surprised as to how much information you can pack into two pages!

Contact Information

At the top of your medical résumé, include the following information:

  • Full name, address, city/state/zip, landline/cell phone numbers and email address
  • Personal data including date of birth, social security number and any patient identification numbers from your medical centers

Insurance Information

Include company names, phone numbers and account numbers.

Allergies

Since allergies could be life threatening, it is important that they be listed early on in your medical résumé. I am allergic to sulfa drugs and scan dyes. I used to just mention these two items; however I found healthcare professionals wanted details. They would often ask what kind of reaction I had – a slight rash or a serious reaction that resulted in a hospitalization? I now include brief but significant details about my reactions and you should too.

Medications 

List all the medications you are taking. Do not assume that all healthcare professionals are familiar with your medications and their uses. In addition to pills, also include inhalers, injectable therapies, drops, and ointments. For each medication, include the following:

  • Medication name (be specific, don’t simply say “high blood pressure pill”)
  • Purpose of medication (for example, “used to treat Type II Diabetes”)
  • Dosage
  • Frequency (e.g., number of times taken per day)
  • Pharmacy contact information

Illnesses and Surgeries

This is a place to list significant illnesses and surgeries. You do not need to include every cold you had in your life! For each major illness or surgery, include the following:

  • Type of issue (e.g., knee replacement surgery, prostate cancer)
  • Date of issue (include month and year)
  • Treatments (e.g., surgery, radiation, specific chemo drugs, etc.)
  • Current status (mention if you are in active treatment or when treatment was completed)

Physicians

For each of your current physicians, list the following:

  • Full name (do not just say “Dr. Smith”)
  • Area of medicine (e.g., internist, oncologist, etc.)
  • Location / hospital affiliation
  • Phone number

Emergency Contacts

Include the person’s name, relationship and mobile phone number.

In addition to the personal medical résumé consider developing a family medical history document. Our family developed this type of document, which proved very useful when seeing a new healthcare professional. Also, if appropriate, have an electronic copy of Power of Attorney documents. My brother and & I were my mother’s Power of Attorney. We had an electronic file of this document and could easily print when it was requested.

Medical résumés get the job done!

Improving Clinical Trial Design

Interview With Dr. Michael Thompson (@MTMDPhD), Medical Director, Early Phase Cancer Research Program, University of Wisconsin

Carol Preston’s interview with Dr. Michael Thompson discusses issues related to clinical trial design. The obstacles to good patient-centric clinical trial design are numerous. The informed consent is a text-only legal-type document containing difficult to understand verbiage. Instead, it should be more patient-friendly, with images, graphics and easy-to-understand instructions.

Patients are becoming more empowered and more aware of the issues and are speaking out and willing to participate to make clinical trial design more patient-friendly and effective. More patients are aware of trials and want to educate and inform others. Clinical trial design and informed consent need to be updated and made more efficient so that more patients will be able to easily consider clinical trial enrollment.

Check out the full conversation and the rest of Dr. Thompson’s ideas in the video below:

Improving Clinical Trial Design from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Why So Few Adults in Clinical Trials?

Interview With Dr. Michael Thompson (@MTMDPhD), Medical Director, Early Phase Cancer Research Program, University of Wisconsin

In Carol Preston’s interview with Dr. Michael Thompson, he states that about 60% of children participate in clinical trials, but only 3-5% of adults do. So, the question becomes, why are there so few adults participating in clinical trials? What are the adults afraid of? Dr. Thompson goes through some of the reasons why adults do not participate as much in clinical trials as much as children:

  • Patients do not qualify for the available trial
  • Patients believe trials require more testing, resulting in more travel and higher costs
  • Patients think trials may require too much effort on their part
  • Many patients distrust clinical trials
  • Patients don’t believe in the drugs
  • Many patients are not even aware of available clinical trials
  • Patients are afraid of receiving a placebo
  • Patients are afraid of having adverse side effects from the medication

Check out the full video below as Dr. Thompson further discusses this topic and how trial enrollment statistics could change through patient education and engagement. If cancer patients are informed about what clinical trials could offer them, or if they are able to ask questions, more adult patients may be more willing to participant in these trials.

Why are Patients Afraid of Enrolling in Clinical Trials- from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Virtual Patient Communities

Virtual Patient Communities Engendering A New Social Health Era

Howard Rheingold, who coined the phrase virtual communities, describes them as “cultural aggregations that emerge when enough people bump into each other often enough in cyberspace.” Rheingold’s words, though descriptive, may not fully capture the depth and breadth of experience many patients find when they go online.

Before the Internet connected people from every corner of the globe, many patients experienced their illness in isolation. Humans have an innate desire to feel connected with others who live life through similar lenses. The Internet, and social media in particular, has lessened this sense of isolation. It has shown us how much people are willing to reach out to others to provide advice and support – even to strangers online. Clay Shirky, author of Here Comes Everybody: How Change Happens when People Come Together, holds that “the desire to be part of a group that shares, cooperates, or acts in concert is a basic human instinct.”

There are as many reasons for joining a virtual community as there are communities online. Probably the most common reason people go online when they (or someone they care about) are diagnosed with an illness, is to find information. Figures from the Pew Research Center show that 1 in 5 Internet users have gone online to find others who might have health concerns similar to theirs. That percentage is even higher – 1 in 4 – among those living with chronic disease, or caring for someone with a disease. Not surprisingly, doctors remain the first choice for an accurate medical diagnosis. But the number of patients saying they turn to their friends, family and other patients for day-to-day advice, and emotional support is higher.

For some patients turning online for support is more convenient; not everyone can attend an in-person support meeting at the time they most need it. Online you can find 24/7 access to support, unbound by restrictions of time or location. Any person, anywhere, any time – whether they are a patient, caregiver, family member, or friend—can find someone else in similar circumstances who understands what they are going through.

For others, it is about finding hope. Corrie Painter, an angiosarcoma patient, passionately believes that networked patients save lives. In Rare Cancer Meets Social Media, Painter captures the joy of finding hope online.

“When faced with mortality, I think the first thing many of us do is try and find someone, ANYONE else who understands what we’re going through. I put feelers out into every corner of the Internet. And I found people! I sent them messages and received nothing in return. Turned out they were gone, all of them, by the time I tried to reach them. So I turned to Facebook in a last ditch attempt to find anyone who knew anything about this disease. And I found her. The one and only Lauren Ryan, alongside eight other members of an angiosarcoma facebook group that Lauren started in 2010. Every single one of them was alive. They were ALIVE. I instantly connected with each of them. Josephine was 3 years out from my same diagnosis and was ALIVE. Lauren was a year and a half out and had no evidence of disease. They took me under their wing and provided me with hope in spades. I clung to every word they wrote. It was the same story eight times over”.

Personal stories and first person accounts of illness are the life blood pulsing through the social media healthcare eco-system. By telling your story, you can help shed light on a condition’s symptoms, prognosis, and other details for those still searching for the correct diagnosis. Medical terminology and data, though undeniably important, can obscure what it means to live with a disease and make it difficult for most people to relate. Personal stories, though, frame our individual experiences in a way that lets others connect and find diagnostic clues that may have been missing. Isabel Jordan, the mother of a son with a rare disease, credits reading a patient’s blog to help her finally see the pattern in symptoms in her own son’s life, which set them on a new diagnostic path.

“As a parent of a child with a rare disease I’m constantly looking for patterns, for clues, for ideas of what could be next in our diagnostic journey,” she writes, “I look for researchers, doctors, other connected parents to see what they are posting. It was through reading someone else’s blog that I could finally see the pattern in symptoms in my own son’s life. Connecting the dots by seeing them in someone else let me provide valuable clues to our own clinician researchers and now we’re heading down a new diagnostic path. Would I have seen them anyway? I don’t know. But I credit my connections on social media for helping me keep my eyes open to new ideas”.

In the case of rare diseases, where doctors simply don’t have the answers to patients’ questions due to low patient numbers and, consequently, insufficient research into the disease, it is the patients themselves who are banding together to find the answers they need. Katherine Leon, an SCAD (spontaneous coronary artery dissection) survivor, leveraged the power of her virtual community to find the cause of her rare heart disease, and prevent it from happening to others. At the time of her diagnosis, SCAD was a poorly understood and under-researched condition. Physicians had no clinical studies on which to base treatment plans. Katherine connected with fellow SCAD survivors through social media and used their collective voice to do what hospitals couldn’t – to launch research at the Mayo Clinic. Leon credits social media as a key research accelerant. “Social media absolutely gets the credit for making scientific study of SCAD possible” she says, “in 2003, my cardiologist told me I would never meet another SCAD patient. It was just too rare. Today, I “know” more than 1,000 fellow survivors thanks to Inspire, Facebook ‎and Google”.

If stories are the life blood of an online patient network, a strong sense of community is at its heart. Members share an emotional connection to each other and a sense of shared experiences. They have a feeling of belonging to and identifying with the community, believing they matter within the community and they can influence and be influenced by them. Diabetes patient and advocate, Renza Scibilia believes that “there can be real solidarity when you are part of an online community.” She writes, “one of the reasons social media is so powerful is because of the way it connects people. By removing all the constraints that would normally prevent people from sharing, we form connections based on shared experiences and familiar stories”.

What does the future hold for virtual patient communities?

In David Weinberger’s book, Too Big To Know, the author argues that we are in a new age of “networked knowledge”; meaning that knowledge – ideas, information, wisdom – has broken out of its physical confines and now exists in a hyper-connected online state. Translating Weinberger’s argument to healthcare, the narrative is one in which the uptake of social media signifies a radical transformation of established notions of patienthood, with patients now situated within connections to other patients, family members, carers and healthcare professionals, creating a new social health experience.

CEO of Smart Patients, Roni Zeiger M.D., is convinced “that our next exponential leap in medical progress depends on us learning from networks of micro-experts.” The learning that begins in virtual patient communities can quickly translate to offline activity. Corrie Painter knows first-hand the power of tapping into a network of micro-experts.

“When people find us now”, she writes, “it actually might change the course of their disease. We have sent so many people to the same doctors that they have become clinical experts. These doctors now understand nuances of this disease that weren’t possible when only a handful of angiosarcoma patients would come through their clinics each year. Patients who get treated at these large volume centers bring the knowledge from these clinician experts to their local doctors. As a result, the patients are driving expertise in this rarest of rare orphan cancers, and that expertise is filtering out into local clinics. All because of our collective need to connect with others diagnosed with angiosarcoma”.

In the future, new online tools will come and they will go, but our innate desire to reach out, to connect, and to help one another will remain. It’s people who ultimately build communities, not technology. The communities may be virtual, but they are no less real. It’s still individuals speaking to other individuals, people helping other people. What’s changed, to quote Sussanah Fox, Chief Technology Officer at U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is that we now do it at the speed of internet connectivity. Fox thinks that “the most exciting innovation of the connected health era is people talking with each other.” That may sound simple, but as the stories in this article illustrate, talking with each other can have profound and far-reaching effects in our connected digital age.

 

 

How to Prepare for a Second Opinion Doctor Appointment

Expert physicians and cancer patients agree that getting a second opinion is crucial, even if you are very pleased with your primary medical team. It is your health and your life; take care of yourself!

A second opinion will help you learn more about your illness and treatment options. What you learn also will help you communicate intelligently with your medical team to get the best, most personalized care.

But doctor appointments can be scary, overwhelming and intimidating. There is the possibility of bad news and the apprehension of receiving confusing an difficult-to-understand information. Here are some tips to help you make the most of your second opinion appointment.

Prepare in advance

Plan to take a trusted friend or family member with you

This is critical. Memory retention is only 10% and less when you are stressed. You will not remember everything that is said during the appointment. You need to have someone there with you to be ‘another set of eyes and ears’. Then you can discuss key points with this other person to make sure you both heard the same information, go over options, and, if appropriate, ask for their input and opinion,

Record the conversation

Ask the doctor if you can record the conversation. Pull out your smartphone and record it! Then you can play it back at your leisure and discuss it with your family and the person who accompanied you to the appointment. You can then go over key issues, play back critical discussions and not miss anything!

By the way, many expert physicians have endorsed the idea of recording the discussion at a doctor appointment so don’t be afraid to ask!

Think of questions to ask and write them down ahead of time

No one thinks and speaks at the same time and does it effectively. And stress adds to the mix. So plan ahead and write your questions down to prepare yourself for the appointment. For example:

  • Confirmation of diagnosis
  • What are the next steps?
  • Am I eligible for a clinical trial?
  • What are my treatment options and does the second opinion doctor agree with the original treatment options?
  • What are the side effects of the treatment options?

If a clinical trial is advisable, you can ask these questions:

  • What is the purpose of the study?
  • Who is sponsoring the study, and who has reviewed and approved it?
  • What kinds of tests, medicines, surgery, or devices are involved? Are any procedures painful?
  • What are the possible risks, side effects, and benefits of taking part in the study?
  • How might this trial affect my daily life? Will I have to be in the hospital?
  • How long will the trial last?
  • Who will pay for the tests and treatments I receive?
  • Will I be reimbursed for other expenses (for example, travel and child care)?
  • Who will be in charge of my care?
  • What will happen after the trial?

Bottom line: You do not need to become a medical expert in your disease. By following the guidelines above, you can become more knowledgeable to make informed decisions about your path to improved health and quality of life.

 

 

The Importance of Self-Advocacy

Interview of V.K. Gadi, MD, PhD Associate Member, Clinical Research Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Dr. Gadi is interviewed on the importance of self-advocacy by cancer patients. He explains that historically, the doctor/patient relationship has been paternalistic, but such is not the case anymore. Now, Dr. Gadi learns just as much from his patients as from other sources. When patients are empowered with knowledge about their disease, they will be better equipped to carry on an intelligent conversation with their medical team and better understand the rationale for their treatment plan.

Dr. Gadi encourages patients to learn and to self-advocate in order to better understand their treatment options and help choose the best care available to them.

The Importance of Patient Self-Advocacy from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Questions Patients Have About Clinical Trials

Interview of Dr. Philip Thompson, Assistant Professor, Leukemia Department, MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dr. Philip Thompson, MD, Assistant Professor, Leukemia Department, Anderson Cancer Center is an oncologist and a researcher who runs many of the clinical trials at MD Anderson. Dr. Thompson is interviewed by CLL patient, Carol Preston about some of the many questions patients have concerning clinical trials.

Dr. Thompson discusses informed consent and the lengthy paperwork involved. He explains that the informed consent document usually covers legal requirements of all stakeholders in the trial and is therefore often difficult for patients to understand. At MD Anderson, there are nurses and other healthcare personnel who can help a patient through this process.

Dr. Thompson advises patients to ask questions of their medical team. An important question to ask at the outset is  what are the benefits and risks of the trial versus the benefits and risks of the standard treatment of care.

Logistics is also an obstacle for many patients. Early phase studies require a great deal of office visits and testing which, in turn, means a great deal of travel to and from the hospital. If the patient lives far away, this could be a hardship. Again, patients need to ask questions and make decisions about what is the best option for them.

Cost is an issue for many patients. Trials require more testing that their insurance may not cover. As a guiding principle, there are 2 types of tests in a trial: those that are considered specific to the study (these are covered by the trial sponsor) and those that are considered standard of care (these are billed to insurance). But there are gray areas. For instance, the study may mandate a CT scan every month and the insurance company may not consider that to be standard of care and not want to pay. Again, patients have to ask questions and demand answers to those questions so that they can make the best decision for them.

Bottom line is: Ask, Ask, Ask!!! Ask questions of your medical team and if you don’t understand the answer, Ask Again!

Questions Patients Have About Clinical Trials from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.