Understanding Your Cancer Prognosis from NCI

This video is part of NCI‘s Understand Your Cancer Prognosis video series published on YouTube on Feb 14, 2018.

If you’ve been diagnosed with cancer it’s natural to wonder, “What are my chances of recovery? Can I be cured? What is the likely course of my disease?” If your cancer is advanced, you may ask, “How long do I have to live?” These are all questions about your cancer prognosis. Produced by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), “Understanding Your Cancer Prognosis” is the main video in the NCI Prognosis Video Series, which offers the perspectives of three cancer patients and their doctor, Anthony L. Back, M.D. — an oncologist who is also a national expert in doctor-patient communication. View the main video to learn key points about prognosis and how to talk about it, and to gain valuable insight from the personal ways each patient has approached questions about their future. To see the related videos and to find other helpful information about how to understand your cancer prognosis and cancer survival statistics, go to http://www.cancer.gov/prognosis.

Facing a Cancer Diagnosis: Advice From An Expert

Facing a Cancer Diagnosis: Advice From An Expert from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Brittany DeGreef, a genetic counselor, provides essential advice for when you are facing a cancer diagnosis emphasizing that leaning on supportive friends and family is key.

Brittany Degreef is a Genetic Counselor at Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University. More about this expert.

See More From the The Pro-Active AML Patient Toolkit


Transcript:

One piece of advice I give patients who are just diagnosed with cancer – and we do frequently see patients at least once a week who were just diagnosed either that week or the week prior – is feel what you need to feel. Not every patient is going to react or cope with their diagnosis in the same way as someone next to them, even within the same family. That also goes for caregivers and relatives.  

 So, just because you feel like helping out a relative in a specific way, it might not be the same for your brother or sister or cousin.  

 So, we always tell patients that there is no wrong or right way to cope with a diagnosis of cancer. The way that you approach it is perfectly fine and there’s no right or wrong way to do that.  

So, another piece of advice we always tell patients is don’t be scared to lean on your support network, whether that be family or friends, your healthcare provider, advocacy groups, never be afraid to ask for help.   

And for some patients who feel like they have limited resources, usually hospitals where you’re receiving your patient care has many resources available to you, whether that be emotional, financial, spiritual, logistical. Don’t be scared to ask about those resources. 

Barby Ingle – What Advice Do You Have For Someone Who Is Newly Diagnosed?

As the president of the International Pain Foundation, a best-selling author, and chronic pain advocate, Barby Ingle shares her advice for the newly diagnosed. For all our A Conversation With… videos please click here.

Barby Ingle – What Advice Do You Have For Someone Who Is Newly Diagnosed? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

What Records Should You Bring For A Second Opinion Appointment?

From the Lung Cancer Town Meeting in September 2016, Janet Freeman-Daily interviews a panel of lung cancer experts about what are the essential records patients should bring to their appointment when getting a second opinion. The panel includes the following experts:

  • Nisha Monhindra, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine, Hematology/Oncology Division, Feinberg School of Medicine Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University
  • D. Ross Camidge, MD, PhD, Director Thoracic Oncology Clinical and Clinical Research Programs University of Colorado Denver
  • David D. Odell, MD, MMSc, Assistant Professor, Thoracic Surgery Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University
  • Timothy J. Kruser, MD, Assistant Professor, Radiation Oncology Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University

Check out the full video below to hear all of the experts advice.

What Records Should Your Bring For A Second Opinion Appointment? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Getting A Second Opinion From A Rural Location?

From a Town Meeting in September 2016, Janet Freeman-Daily interviews a panel of cancer experts about how patients in rural or remote locations can get second or multidisciplinary opinions from larger facilities or academic institutes. The panel includes the following experts:

  • Nisha Monhindra, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine, Hematology/Oncology Division, Feinberg School of Medicine Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University
  • D. Ross Camidge, MD, PhD, Director Thoracic Oncology Clinical and Clinical Research Programs University of Colorado Denver
  • David D. Odell, MD, MMSc, Assistant Professor, Thoracic Surgery Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University
  • Timothy J. Kruser, MD, Assistant Professor, Radiation Oncology Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University

Check out the full video below to hear all the experts advice.

 

Getting A Second Opinion From A Rural Location? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.