M Whole Patient Support Archives

Cancer can unleash a whirlwind of unexpected emotions and experiences for melanoma patients and care partners. You are more than just a patient; more than just a treatment plan.

Whether your concerns are physical, emotional, nutritional, or spiritual, we can help.

More resources for Melanoma Whole Patient Support from Patient Empowerment Network.

Social Media in Hematology

Interview With Dr. Laura C. Michaelis (@lauracmichaelis), MD Clinician and Clinical Researcher at the Medical College of Wisconsin

In an interview with Dr. Laura Michaelis, she discusses how social media can be great tool to connect with other patients with the same disease.  Dr. Michaelis says social media has really revolutionized the way patients to patients, patients to doctors, and doctors to patients are communicating. Watch the full video below to hear the multitude of ways social media can benefit patients and doctors.

Social Media in Hematology from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

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Andrew Schorr:

I just want to get a show of hands of something for a second. How many of you go on the internet to find information for your MPN? Most everybody. Okay. And one other one. How many of you have connected with other patients, like in social media where you’re somehow part of a discussion? Okay. I just want to talk about it and I know that actually Dr. Michaelis, you actually encourage people. This whole connection, Patient to Patient, you’re a big fan of.

Dr. Michaelis:  

Oh yes, absolutely. I actually think social media has really revolutionized the way that patient to patient communication happens, patient to doctor communication happens.

And doctor to patient communication happens. There’s actually a nice paper published out of MD Anderson recently that looked at hematologists and social media Twitter accounts and how people communicate that way. There’s going to be a talk at our national meeting, the American Society of Hematologists, teaching doctors how to use Twitter and use social media not only to talk to one another, but also to talk to patients and also move policy change; policy in certain conditions.

I know a lot of patients who have Facebook groups where they communicate with one another. That can be an invaluable source not only of information but also comradery to take the loneliness out of having a very rare disease where you don’t feel like anybody else knows what you’re going through. We’ve had little town meetings via Twitter where people share information or get communication that way.

I think the sky’s the limit the way that technology is going and how we really branch out from being in our own institutions and just talking to one another within that institution about caring for patients or moving the disease forward. And now we’re looking at a whole different level of communication.

Andrew:   

I’ll mention just a couple of resources for you. So first of all, if you happen to be in the PRM-151 trial, this is the queen of a Facebook group for that. And what’s been happening now is on Facebook, if you’re familiar with it, some people are forming pages and groups around the trial they’re in. it’s not the drug company; it’s not even the clinic. It’s the patients actually in the trial. It’s kind of cool, isn’t it? Yeah, it really is. And then a couple of other resources.

There’s one that started in England and is proliferating around the world called HealthUnlocked.com. The folks from England with MPNs, which was started by a peer of theirs, Dr. Claire Harrison in London, she helped working with patients start a group called MPN Voice.

Dr. Michaelis:   

Yes, one other thing. I would also recommend there is a national resource called ClinicalTrials.gov. This is available online. This is a completely updated list of clinical trials and you can search it by location or by center.

So if you’re getting your care in Akron, you can look at what clinical trials are available in Ohio, or what clinical trials are available 250 miles from me. And then you can search down by myelofibrosis or PV, etc. So I think that and the clinicaltrials.gov and the NCI also have good information on that.

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Virtual Patient Communities

Virtual Patient Communities Engendering A New Social Health Era

Howard Rheingold, who coined the phrase virtual communities, describes them as “cultural aggregations that emerge when enough people bump into each other often enough in cyberspace.” Rheingold’s words, though descriptive, may not fully capture the depth and breadth of experience many patients find when they go online.

Before the Internet connected people from every corner of the globe, many patients experienced their illness in isolation. Humans have an innate desire to feel connected with others who live life through similar lenses. The Internet, and social media in particular, has lessened this sense of isolation. It has shown us how much people are willing to reach out to others to provide advice and support – even to strangers online. Clay Shirky, author of Here Comes Everybody: How Change Happens when People Come Together, holds that “the desire to be part of a group that shares, cooperates, or acts in concert is a basic human instinct.”

There are as many reasons for joining a virtual community as there are communities online. Probably the most common reason people go online when they (or someone they care about) are diagnosed with an illness, is to find information. Figures from the Pew Research Center show that 1 in 5 Internet users have gone online to find others who might have health concerns similar to theirs. That percentage is even higher – 1 in 4 – among those living with chronic disease, or caring for someone with a disease. Not surprisingly, doctors remain the first choice for an accurate medical diagnosis. But the number of patients saying they turn to their friends, family and other patients for day-to-day advice, and emotional support is higher.

For some patients turning online for support is more convenient; not everyone can attend an in-person support meeting at the time they most need it. Online you can find 24/7 access to support, unbound by restrictions of time or location. Any person, anywhere, any time – whether they are a patient, caregiver, family member, or friend—can find someone else in similar circumstances who understands what they are going through.

For others, it is about finding hope. Corrie Painter, an angiosarcoma patient, passionately believes that networked patients save lives. In Rare Cancer Meets Social Media, Painter captures the joy of finding hope online.

“When faced with mortality, I think the first thing many of us do is try and find someone, ANYONE else who understands what we’re going through. I put feelers out into every corner of the Internet. And I found people! I sent them messages and received nothing in return. Turned out they were gone, all of them, by the time I tried to reach them. So I turned to Facebook in a last ditch attempt to find anyone who knew anything about this disease. And I found her. The one and only Lauren Ryan, alongside eight other members of an angiosarcoma facebook group that Lauren started in 2010. Every single one of them was alive. They were ALIVE. I instantly connected with each of them. Josephine was 3 years out from my same diagnosis and was ALIVE. Lauren was a year and a half out and had no evidence of disease. They took me under their wing and provided me with hope in spades. I clung to every word they wrote. It was the same story eight times over”.

Personal stories and first person accounts of illness are the life blood pulsing through the social media healthcare eco-system. By telling your story, you can help shed light on a condition’s symptoms, prognosis, and other details for those still searching for the correct diagnosis. Medical terminology and data, though undeniably important, can obscure what it means to live with a disease and make it difficult for most people to relate. Personal stories, though, frame our individual experiences in a way that lets others connect and find diagnostic clues that may have been missing. Isabel Jordan, the mother of a son with a rare disease, credits reading a patient’s blog to help her finally see the pattern in symptoms in her own son’s life, which set them on a new diagnostic path.

“As a parent of a child with a rare disease I’m constantly looking for patterns, for clues, for ideas of what could be next in our diagnostic journey,” she writes, “I look for researchers, doctors, other connected parents to see what they are posting. It was through reading someone else’s blog that I could finally see the pattern in symptoms in my own son’s life. Connecting the dots by seeing them in someone else let me provide valuable clues to our own clinician researchers and now we’re heading down a new diagnostic path. Would I have seen them anyway? I don’t know. But I credit my connections on social media for helping me keep my eyes open to new ideas”.

In the case of rare diseases, where doctors simply don’t have the answers to patients’ questions due to low patient numbers and, consequently, insufficient research into the disease, it is the patients themselves who are banding together to find the answers they need. Katherine Leon, an SCAD (spontaneous coronary artery dissection) survivor, leveraged the power of her virtual community to find the cause of her rare heart disease, and prevent it from happening to others. At the time of her diagnosis, SCAD was a poorly understood and under-researched condition. Physicians had no clinical studies on which to base treatment plans. Katherine connected with fellow SCAD survivors through social media and used their collective voice to do what hospitals couldn’t – to launch research at the Mayo Clinic. Leon credits social media as a key research accelerant. “Social media absolutely gets the credit for making scientific study of SCAD possible” she says, “in 2003, my cardiologist told me I would never meet another SCAD patient. It was just too rare. Today, I “know” more than 1,000 fellow survivors thanks to Inspire, Facebook ‎and Google”.

If stories are the life blood of an online patient network, a strong sense of community is at its heart. Members share an emotional connection to each other and a sense of shared experiences. They have a feeling of belonging to and identifying with the community, believing they matter within the community and they can influence and be influenced by them. Diabetes patient and advocate, Renza Scibilia believes that “there can be real solidarity when you are part of an online community.” She writes, “one of the reasons social media is so powerful is because of the way it connects people. By removing all the constraints that would normally prevent people from sharing, we form connections based on shared experiences and familiar stories”.

What does the future hold for virtual patient communities?

In David Weinberger’s book, Too Big To Know, the author argues that we are in a new age of “networked knowledge”; meaning that knowledge – ideas, information, wisdom – has broken out of its physical confines and now exists in a hyper-connected online state. Translating Weinberger’s argument to healthcare, the narrative is one in which the uptake of social media signifies a radical transformation of established notions of patienthood, with patients now situated within connections to other patients, family members, carers and healthcare professionals, creating a new social health experience.

CEO of Smart Patients, Roni Zeiger M.D., is convinced “that our next exponential leap in medical progress depends on us learning from networks of micro-experts.” The learning that begins in virtual patient communities can quickly translate to offline activity. Corrie Painter knows first-hand the power of tapping into a network of micro-experts.

“When people find us now”, she writes, “it actually might change the course of their disease. We have sent so many people to the same doctors that they have become clinical experts. These doctors now understand nuances of this disease that weren’t possible when only a handful of angiosarcoma patients would come through their clinics each year. Patients who get treated at these large volume centers bring the knowledge from these clinician experts to their local doctors. As a result, the patients are driving expertise in this rarest of rare orphan cancers, and that expertise is filtering out into local clinics. All because of our collective need to connect with others diagnosed with angiosarcoma”.

In the future, new online tools will come and they will go, but our innate desire to reach out, to connect, and to help one another will remain. It’s people who ultimately build communities, not technology. The communities may be virtual, but they are no less real. It’s still individuals speaking to other individuals, people helping other people. What’s changed, to quote Sussanah Fox, Chief Technology Officer at U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is that we now do it at the speed of internet connectivity. Fox thinks that “the most exciting innovation of the connected health era is people talking with each other.” That may sound simple, but as the stories in this article illustrate, talking with each other can have profound and far-reaching effects in our connected digital age.

 

 

8 Beliefs That Can Hold Caregivers Back (from reaching out for help)

"No one can do what I can do"

“No one can do what I can do”

Family caregivers too often suffer from two very common things: overwhelm and isolation. Or, to it put another way, exhaustion and loneliness. So often, the nature of illness and trauma not only disrupts our normal ways of living, but also disrupts our connections with people who care about us. Caregivers who reach out for support gain the benefits of lessening their burdens and of feeling the warmth provided by people who care.

Too often, caregivers hold back from reaching out because of beliefs they have about doing so:

  •  Nobody else can do what I do for my loved one.
  •  My loved one won’t accept help from anyone but me.
  •  I’m too busy to even begin to think about doing anything more – even reaching out.
  •  The moment I start reaching out, our family will lose our privacy.
  •  I’m afraid of imposing on people.
  •  Reaching out shows weakness; doing it yourself shows strength.
  •  I’m afraid that nobody will come forward to help me.
  •  Since I’m able to handle things now, I’ll be able to continue to do so.

These, beliefs, while completely understandable and very common, are neither healthy for you as a caregiver or for your loved one. They get in the way of your resilience and your capacity to sustain yourself for however long your caregiving is required. Each week, I will be focusing in on one of these self-limiting beliefs and invite you to come along with me in exploring those that you are now willing to let go of and change into ones that help you not only survive, but thrive.

So let’s get started:

Nobody else can do what I do for my loved one

Think of the whole range of “things” you are currently doing. First think of the practical ones: dressing, managing and administering the meds, shopping, preparing, serving and cleaning up after meals, assisting with bathing and toileting, and so on. Now focus on the emotional and spiritual ones – showing love, being a trusted confidant, giving emotional support and comfort, etc.

Nobody else can do these things exactly how you’re doing them or would your loved one experience them in the same way if they were done by people other than you. No one else is so attuned to your loved one’s needs and preferences and, most likely, your loved one is most receptive to your way of doing these things. And, no one else would be as committed to your loved one’s comfort and be as vigilant as you are. This much is true.

But, the trap here is believing that, since no one else can do things the way you do, that no one else can do them or do them satisfactorily for you and your loved one.

Let’s take a look at some of those practical things that I listed above. Take one area for starters, e.g. grocery shopping. These days, it’s not like the days when our mothers used to look the butcher in the eye and tell him she wants a better cut of meat than the way he did it last week. Shopping simply means meal planning, list making and going out and getting the groceries – all very delegatable tasks. When you think about, I think you’ll agree that many if not most of the practical things can be done by others. Not necessarily with your intimate knowledge and way of doing things, but in their own ways. And, similarly, other people will bring their own and distinctly different ways of providing emotional and spiritual support as well.

Bottom line: Is this a belief you’ve been holding? If so, how does it serve you? How does it hinder you? How might you re-write that belief so that it serves you better? For example, “There are some things that other people can help with. I’m going to try this out with some simple things.” What practical step can you take to try out that new belief this very week? Let us know – by commenting on this blog. You’ll help yourself and other caregivers by doing so.

 

 

 

 

 

Twitter Tips and Resources for Cancer Patients

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The “Twitterverse” is pretty mainstream now and not just for the younger generations any more. Of the many, many uses for twitter, cancer information, education and support are gaining ground. Twitter is fast, easy, mobile and instantly gratifying.  Information literally at your fingertips.

Several articles have been published on the increased use of twitter by cancer patients, from cancer patients tweeting through chemo, “power” cancer patient tweeters in Japan, and a controversial article in ASCO about a breast cancer patient tweeting about her disease.

Tweeting is easy. Set up an account and go! If you are interested in getting some good information back from Twitter though, you should choose carefully whom to follow.

All news sources are on Twitter, so it’s easy to find them and follow them.  All top cancer medical centers are on Twitter and they are a great source of information on cancer research, news, clinical studies and basic medical information. Here a just a few to start with:

@MDAndersonNews

@DanaFarber

@SeattleCCA

@MayoClinic

@MoffittNews

@LurieCancer

Patient support groups for cancer patients are numerous and you can usually find one that is specific to your illness. Again, here are some to start with:

@StupidCancer – mainly for young cancer patients

@ImermanAngels

@MyelomaCrowd

@MyelomaTeacher

@MyBCTeam – for breast cancer survivors

@CancerSupportCM

@PCFNews – Prostate Care Foundation

@PanCan – Pancreatic Cancer Action Network

There are many, many more – this is just a small sampling. To find specific groups or people to follow, you should use the search engine on Twitter or do a hashtag search and see what comes up. For instance, if you are interested in following groups or people that tweet about stomach cancer, do a search and research their profiles. For instance, I just searched “stomach cancer” and this is what came up:

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You can now go to these twitter profiles and see if these are some people that you would be interested in following.

And if I do a hashtag search for #stomachcancer, I find this:

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So you can go to these twitter profiles and see if any of them appeal to you.

It’s quite simple and you can follow some groups and people for a while and then “unfollow” them if their tweets are not what you were looking for. Once you follow people or groups that you know have the same interests as you, you can use them as your “news stream” and tailor your stream to the kind of information that is most suited to you.

Twitter is easy, quick and gets to the point right away (it has to – with only 240 characters allowed by tweet!) It’s a great way to keep informed and have custom-made information at your fingertips.

Living Well with Cancer

I would bet that most, if not all cancer patients understand how important it is to maintain a healthy lifestyle while living with the disease. However, I feel that living well is so important for everyone that I wanted to touch on some key points and point out some cool resources that can help maintain an active and healthy life.

MD Anderson points out why a healthy lifestyle is important for cancer survivors:

“A healthy lifestyle is important after cancer treatment. Good nutrition and regular exercise can:

  • Reduce your risk of cancer (new or recurrence)
  • Help relieve long-term side effects of treatment
  • Lessen feelings of sadness and improve mood
  • Improve your heart and lung health and lower the risk of heart disease
  • Help lose or maintain weight
  • Increase energy, endurance, strength and flexibility
  • Lessen the effects of stress, anxiety and fatigue
  • Help maintain normal bowel function”

MD Anderson goes on to offer tips on healthy eating such as avoiding red meat, limiting sugar, salt, processed foods and alcohol intake (the resveratrol in wine may not be the wonder ingredient it was thought to be), and eating lots of plant-based foods such as fruits and vegetables.

Besides eating well, be sure to practice regular exercise, including aerobic activity and muscle strengthening activity.

Some people have no problem following this regimen. Others find it difficult to motivate themselves. Below are some tips and hints that may be useful:

Healthy Eating

It’s Spring! Visit a Farmers Market in your area. This time of year, these markets are so colorful, brimming with fresh fruits and vegetables.

Local farmers market in Charlottesville, Virginia

Local farmers market in Charlottesville, Virginivegetables. And many local newspapers or magazines offer great recipes for local crops. Plan on eating just vegetables for lunch a couple of days a week; you really may enjoy it!

Join a local food co-op. These are more and more popular. Local farmers will deliver seasonal crops to a central location or even deliver them to your home. Plan your meals around the crops and look for recipes including them, rather than choosing a recipe and then purchasing the ingredients. With online search engines, finding recipes takes seconds – include the term healthy in your search.

Join a healthy eating group, or healthy cooking group. Start an herb garden to make your vegetables all the more tasty. Experiment with spices and ethnic recipes. Grind and toast your own spices.

Join Pinterest and check out all the tasty, healthy recipes there. Create your own board and pin some of your favorites. Cleveland Clinic has a wonderful Facebook page with healthy eating tips and healthy lifestyle tips. “Like” their page and get their updates daily.

Currently, UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers are doing a clinical trial on how diet affects cancer patients. In the Sacramento Bee,  Dr Edwin Alvarez, a gynecological cancer specialist there is quoted as saying,

“Whole lifestyle changes including diet may have something to do with patient recovery. We’re participating in a clinical trial right now addressing this question. If they overhaul their diet, do they do better? Right now, we don’t know the answer.”

There is also a cookbook out entitled, The Ultimate Anti-Cancer Cookbook by Pamela Braun. I have not read it so can not offer a review but in the same article as above, Dr Edwin Alvarez comments about it in regards to diet, nutrition and cancer,

“… research is certainly indicating that good diet has a strong influence on (reducing) cancer risk,” he added. “That’s part of the message (in Braun’s book) that I can underline.”

Diet and exercise are part of the recovery process for every patient, Alvarez noted. “It’s easy enough to say, ‘Eat better.’ But the patient then asks, ‘How?’ That can be tough to really address while also treating the cancer adequately.”

Staying Active

Staying active is key to keeping healthy and aging gracefully. Aerobic exercise, muscle strengthening, balance and flexibility exercises will all keep your body healthy and fit. Yoga is wonderful for flexibility, balance and strength. Abdominal exercises will help strengthen your back to guard against lower back pain, one of the most common medical conditions. Brisk walking is great to build aerobic strength.

But exercise takes motivation and this is difficult for many. How to get motivated? Here are some ideas:

Exercise with a friend. If you have a partner, it’s easier to stay motivated and more difficult to back out.

I am a puppy raiser for Service Dogs of Virginia. I am here with my current "student", Bolo

I am a puppy raiser for Service Dogs of Virginia. I am here with my current “student”, Bolo

If you have a dog, walk with your dog; they are great walking companions. If you don’t have a dog, consider volunteering at a local SPCA and walk the dogs there. Or volunteer at a local service dog organization and take these wonderful animals on outings to the local supermarkets and shopping malls. You may be surprised at all the people you meet while walking dogs. It is a great way to get out, stay active and meet new people.

Use a gadget! Get a Fitbit or a BodyMediaFit. These devices track everything from calorie intake to steps taken, sleep patterns and periods of exercise then sort and analyse the data to give you organized charts on your mobile phone. Track your steps on these devices or just get a simple pedometer and track steps on that. See how many steps you take a day and try to improve on that number.

Watch some yoga YouTube videos. Find out what kind of yoga is good for you and start stretching. Start slow. Join a local healthclub or yoga studio for personalized help.

The key to getting and staying motivated to exercise is to find the activity that is best for YOU. But do something! You owe it to your body and to your mind.

Healthy living, including healthy eating and staying active is important for everyone. But for anyone who has a chronic disease, it is critical. Please, Empower yourself and take care of yourself and your health!