Renal Medullary Carcinoma (RMC) Archives

Renal medullary carcinoma, commonly known as RMC, is a rare cancer of the kidneys. RMC is known to nearly exclusively affect young people of African ethnicity who carry sickle cell disease, sickle cell trait, or other sickle hemoglobinopathies.

Extended Quick Guide to Medicare

This guide was originally published by our partner, Triage Cancer, here.

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Quick Guide to Health Insurance Options

This guide was originally published by our partner, Triage Cancer, here.

2018-Health-Insurance-Options-Quick-Guide

Financial Resources for Patients and Families

Financial Resources

Barriers to Clinical Trial Participation

 

What are some of the barriers to clinical trial participation? What is a virtual clinical trial? Should my doctor be speaking to me about my clinical trial options? Dana Dornsife, founder of Lazarex Cancer Foundation, speaks to the key barriers in trials and how COVID-19 has really opened the door for a lot of opportunity to engage with patients around clinical trials.

Barriers to Clinical Trial Participation

Barriers to Clinical Trial Participation from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

What is a Virtual Clinical Trial?

What is a Virtual Clinical Trial? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

COVID and Clinical Trials

COVID and Clinical Trials: Has There Been a Shift? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Tomorrow’s Medicine Today

 

From PEN-Powered Activity Guide V, beloved medical oncologist Dr. Bora Lim of The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center walks us through what a clinical trial is, the phase of how drugs get approved, and how the pandemic crisis has amplified the criticality of clinical trials.

What is a Clinical Trial?

What is a Clinical Trial? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

How Do Drugs Get Approved?

How Do Drugs Get Approved? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Will Pandemic Transform Future of Clinical Trials?

Will Pandemic Transform Future of Clinical Trials? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Clinical Trials as an Empowerment Tool

Clinical Trials as an Empowerment Tool from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

The Power of Journaling During Cancer Treatment

There are two ways to fight cancer, both of which are equally as important. The first is physical and the second mental. Journaling might not be able to help with the physical symptoms, but easing the mind can truly help in such situations.

By providing a safe place to store your thoughts and experiences, you will be able to find a great source of power. If you have never thought about journaling before, this might be the perfect time for you to give it a try. Here are some important reasons why this might be a very great decision.

1. Keeping track of all important moments

Some people believe that battling cancer is only filled with negative moments and experiences. While that is true to a big extent, there can be plenty of memorable moments that you might want to keep track of. The beginning of your treatments is a moment that you can write about and think about when this situation is over.

Other important moments might include family gatherings, important presents you might receive, very bad and very good days that stand out in your treatment course. Just because a day way difficult doesn’t mean it should be considered bad. At the end of this difficult journey, you will be able to look back at everything you wrote and remember the good and bad times.

2. Helping ease certain symptoms

Another great reason why journaling can truly help cancer patients during their treatments is because of symptom management. Research has actually shown that journaling can help with combating symptoms and dealing with the physical size of things.

Writing about how you feel and what you are going through can help you sleep better and feel more energetic. Getting plenty of rest will allow you to feel less nauseous, be in a better mood and battle everything with a stronger will. The more you face your symptoms, the stronger you will feel through your treatment.

3. Fighting against the stress

The stress that can be caused by such a difficult diagnosis is great and can truly affect your mood and outlook on life. Being under stress can make you feel tired, mess up your sleeping schedule and make you feel more negative about everything. This is not ideal for any situation you are in in your life and there are ways to overcome it.

Journaling can provide you with a safe space to write everything you have in your mind. During your treatments, you will possibly want to appear strong in front of your family and you might not want to share everything you feel. You can write all your thoughts in your journal and let everything out. This way you will be able to handle everything you face and feel a lot less stressed.

4. Reminding yourself of things you love

When dealing with any hardship in life, it is important to keep thinking of things that bring you joy. Journaling has helped me create a notebook full of memories, which I can go through any time I need some positivity in my life. You don’t only have to put words into it but anything and everything that makes you think of memories and people you hold dear.

In your journal you can keep stickers, receipts, drawings and cards from loved ones. Then you can write how receiving these things made you felt. When the days get difficult and you are struggling, open your journal again. Read through everything nice you have collected and it can help you remember all the reasons why this difficult process is worth it.

5. Seeing all the progress you have made

Last but not least, another important reason why journaling is so helpful during cancer treatment is that it can help keep track of your progress. There are going to be many days that will be hard and many that will be good and filled with hope. In order to be able to go through both, it is important that you keep track of everything new that happens in your journey.

The good days will help you remember that things will get better. The difficult days will allow you to live in the moment and work on staying positive. Journaling this experience can also help your family better understand what goes on in your head and how they can help. After you have successfully put this difficult period of your life behind, you can even share your story with other patients through your journal.

Battling cancer every way possible

Journaling is a creative and fun activity that can help you deal with certain symptoms and negative thoughts during your treatment. Even if you have little experience with writing, journaling gives you the chance to get creative. You don’t need any special skills in order to journal. You just need a notebook, some fun colors and a few thoughts in your head.

Through writing about your experiences, you will be able to express how you feel and let everything run its course. This treatment course might be tough, but writing everything down will help you see just how much progress you are making. This can truly help you feel stronger mentally and physically and overcome this situation like a true warrior!

What Health Disparities Exist for Patients with Renal Medullary Carcinoma?

This video was originally published by Diverse Health Hub here.

What Health Disparities Exist for Patients with Renal Medullary Carcinoma? from Diverse Health Hub on Vimeo.

Dr. Pavlos Msaouel broaches the disparities that exist for patients with Renal Medullary Carcinoma (RMC). He contends that RMC afflicts a very vulnerable population, that is young African Americans. The disparity exists due to the young age of these patients who aren’t part of a work force with health insurance. Secondarily, this has caused RMC to be underdiagnosed, preventing optimal treatment for patients.

On a global scale, Nigerians face the same disparity, as traits of RMC affect a large number of the population. There are virtually zero reports of its existence and patients again are underdiagnosed. Dr. Msaouel argues we need to research questions that answer where and how RMC affects particular populations in order to equalize the disparity of underdiagnosed patients. Currently the US is gathering data and creating RMC patient communities and advocates. Dr. Msaouel stresses this research is needed on a global scale as well.


Transcript:

Rebecca Law:

Dr. Msaouel, what disparities exist for patients with Renal Medullary Carcinoma?

Dr. Pavlos Msaouel:

Now that is a wonderful and very important question because there are certainly disparities in caring for individuals with RMC (Renal Medullary Carcinoma). Think about it these are people who are young and young people in general — you know they do not have necessarily for example, in the U.S. that kind of insurance when they’re in their twenties or teenagers that they will have later in life or even you know are not part of the work force in that sense. But it’s even more challenging if you think that the vast majority of individuals with RMC are young African Americans. So, this is a disease that particularly afflicts a very vulnerable population, so there is no doubt that health disparities afflict individuals with RMC and this may be part of the reason why for many years this was an underdiagnosed disease.

Dr. Pavlos Msaouel:

We are finding out now that this cancer is more common than we originally thought. It’s still a rare cancer, there is no doubt about that, but it is more common than we originally thought to the point that nowadays in our clinics we see about 1 new case, 1 new patient with RMC per month. So that’s certainly more common than the about 100 cases that have been published thus far in the literature—there are many more that we do not know of. And think about it also in a different way, from a more global perspective. So, there is about let’s say 3 million individuals in the U.S. who carry the sickle cell trait. Most would be African Americans, other ones will be Caucasians so there are many different people who can have the sickle cell trait, but it’s mainly African Americans, but there are 300 million people in the world that carry the sickle cell trait — mainly in Africa.

Dr. Pavlos Msaouel: 

So, let’s take for example, Nigeria – there are many people in Nigeria who have the sickle cell trait yet how may reports are there about the existence of this cancer in these countries, essentially almost 0 and so that is a disparity in itself. This is a cancer that can be difficult to diagnose especially if you do not know about it, if you’ve never heard of it, but even if you do – even if a physician or healthcare personnel knows about this cancer it still needs specific tests to be done and many of them cannot be done in most countries so that’s also a disparity.

Dr. Pavlos Msaouel:

So the mere fact that this cancer cannot be diagnosed in many countries in the world is a disparity in itself, so if we were able to correct this and understand more about where it happens and how often it happens we know much more nowadays thankfully through the work of many people in the U.S. now that are becoming passionate about helping individuals with RMC (Renal Medullary Carcinoma) so we are gathering a lot of data, a lot of information, we have patient communities in the U.S., we have patient advocates that help immensely in the U.S, but this is very likely a global phenomenon, so that’s a disparity that will need to be addressed.

How Can Providers Combat Inequities in the Care of Renal Medullary Carcinoma Patients?

This video was originally published by Diverse Health Hub here.

How Can Providers Combat Inequities in the Care of Renal Medullary Carcinoma Patients? from Diverse Health Hub on Vimeo.

Dr. Msaouel tackles the question of how providers can combat inequities in the care of Renal Medullary Carcinoma (RMC) patients. He states that patients go undiagnosed because providers don’t know about the disease. Dr. Msaouel urges that healthcare providers raise awareness about RMC and in doing so be diligent about screening patients with particular symptoms.

According to Dr. Msaouel, young African Americans possessing sickle cell traits and blood in the urine must be taken seriously and screened with ultrasound to check for suspicious kidney masses. They must be thoroughly checked with proper diagnosis. Dr. Msaouel says providers in the US know more about RMC but efforts must be increased to raise optimal awareness not only here in the states but around the world.


Transcript:

Rebecca Law: Dr. Msaouel, what can providers do to combat inequities in the care of Renal Medullary Carcinoma patients?

Dr. Pavlos Msaouel: So that’s a wonderful question. One way to be able to address this is to help as a provider raise awareness. So, one of the things that is happening is that very often in these cases, patients with RMC are undiagnosed because people don’t know about it. So, if healthcare providers know about this then they can think about it, and then they can start having it in mind. And so, if a young individual — especially if it’s a young African American who has the sickle cell trait — comes with blood in the urine in the ER you have to take it seriously.

Dr. Pavlos Msaouel: You have to do potentially an ultrasound of the kidney and if you do an ultrasound of the kidneys and you find something that’s suspicious like a mass, you have to take that very seriously. This is thankfully happening more and more often in the United States, but not necessarily always and it needs to happen more often around the world as well. So, that’s a simple step that we can do to address the inequity for this cancer.

Are Sickle Cell Disease Patients More Susceptible to Renal Medullary Carcinoma?

This video was originally published by Diverse Health Hub here.

Are Sickle Cell Disease Patients More Susceptible to Renal Medullary Carcinoma? from Diverse Health Hub on Vimeo.

Are sickle cell disease patients more at risk for developing renal medullary carcinoma? In this highly informative interview, Dr. Pavlos Msaouel, a respected clinician at The University of MD Anderson Cancer Center specializing in treating RMC, shares why sickle cell disease patients and those with sickle cell trait may be more at risk for developing RMC.


Transcript:

Rebecca Law: 

Dr. Msaouel, are sickle cell disease patients more susceptible to renal medullary carcinoma?

Dr. Pavlos Msaouel:

So that is a wonderful question. So, it is not just individuals with sickle cell disease that are more susceptible to developing RMC, it also individuals with sickle cell trait. And there are many more individuals who have the sickle cell trait than those with disease.

Dr. Pavlos Msaouel:
About for every one individual with sickle cell disease there will be about 40 — that’s 4-0 — individuals with sickle cell trait. And many of them that carry the sickle cell trait will not know that they carry the sickle cell trait. So having either sickle cell disease or sickle cell trait increases substantially the risk for developing RMC. And why does that happen? It happens because when you carry either the sickle cell trait or sickle cell disease, your red blood cells — these are the cells in the blood that carry oxygen — normally, they will have this round shape, but if you have the sickle cell disease that shape is changed, it’s like a sickle, it changed to the form of a sickle.

Dr. Pavlos Msaouel:
If you have the sickle cell disease that will happen everywhere in your body. If you have the sickle cell trait, then your red blood cells will look normal in most areas of your body. However, there is one area in the kidney called the medulla of the kidney where the cells will look sickles whether you have sickle cell trait or sickle cell disease. And to our understanding, having these cells that look like sickles in the medulla damages the medulla in a way that increases the risk for developing this cancer. So RMC stands for renal medullary carcinoma and the medullary part in the middle of the name means that it comes from the medulla.

What is Renal Medullary Carcinoma?

This video was originally published by Diverse Health Hub here.

What is Renal Medullary Carcinoma? from Diverse Health Hub on Vimeo.

What is renal medullary carcinoma (RMC)? Dr. Pavlos Msaouel, a medical oncologist treating rare forms of renal cell and urothelial carcinomas, gives an overview of RMC, a rare, deadly type of kidney cancer predominantly afflicting young adults of African decent with sickle cell disease. Dr. Msaouel shares what symptoms have often led to diagnosis and points out that 75% of all RMC cases originate in the right kidney.


Transcript:

Rebecca Law:

Dr. Msaouel, what is renal medullary carcinoma and how is it diagnosed?

Pavlos Msaouel, MD, PhD:
RMC is the acronym for a kidney cancer named Renal Medullary Carcinoma. Renal Medullary Carcinoma or RMC is one of the deadliest kidney cancers, and it predominantly afflicts young people mainly of African descent that carry the sickle cell trait or sickle cell disease.

Pavlos Msaouel, MD, PhD:
It is often diagnosed after patients start developing symptoms, and those symptoms can be blood in the urine — the medical term is hematuria — or they may have pain in their flanks on their side where the kidneys would be, on the right side or on the left side.

Pavlos Msaouel, MD, PhD:
Interestingly RMC mainly happens on the right kidney, so about 75% of all RMC cases will happen in the right kidney. And unfortunately, in the vast majority of cases when it does present, it will be what we call stage 4 — meaning metastatic — meaning it will have spread to other organs.

Communicating About Cancer: A Brief Guide to Telling People Who Care

Getting a cancer diagnosis can easily be the most terrifying, heart-wrenching experiences one has in their lifetime. Everything from different treatment options (if you’re lucky), to financing, and maintaining quality of life suddenly are in full force front and center. It can be hard to know who to turn to if you’re not directed to a support group (of which there are many), and especially how to tell loved ones and co-workers. The choice is yours, of course, in whom you wish to tell and when – there is no right or wrong answer. (However, I and many others have found that having a caregiver to help manage appointments, billing, etc. can help).

Should you choose to tell others, here are some tips that I have read and/or heard from other cancer patients/survivors as well as some I have found personally helpful:

Kids:

  • It depends on the age – using simpler terms with younger kids (8 and under) may be more helpful, while older kids and teens can understand more detail. For example, saying that you’re sick and you’re getting the best care from a team of doctors who really want to help you get better
  • According to the American Cancer Society, children need to know the basics, including:
    • The name of the cancer
    • The specific body part(s) of where it is
    • How it’ll be treated
    • How their own lives will be affected
  • Think of a list of questions ahead of time that you think they may ask and jot down answers, such as how the cancer happened (that it’s not anyone’s fault), if it’s contagious, and/or if it’ll be fatal
  • Make sure that they know you are open to talking about it at any time. You can also perform check-ins with each other to monitor feelings

Family and friends:

  • Select a group of people, including immediate family and close friends
  • Divulge information only you feel comfortable sharing. Maybe it’s the basics, as mentioned above, or more detailed information
  • Prepare for different reactions, including sadness, anger, frustration, depression, anxiety, compassion, and support
  • Also prepare for people to not feel comfortable and feel as if they’re helpless. A cancer diagnosis is a heavy weight to bear, and not everyone will feel like the have the capacity to help as much as they want to
  • As the patient, tell them how you’re looking for support (ex. what are your needs during this time, including physical, emotional, mental). Guiding members of your support system to get your needs met may help them feel more at ease and able to help

Work:

  • Telling a supervisor/manager may be one of the hardest tasks for fear of discrimination
    • However, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), which covers employers with 15 ore more employees, prohibits discrimination based on:
      • Actual disability
      • A perceived history of disability
      • A misperception of current disability
      • History of disability
    • The ADA also:
      • Protects eligible cancer survivors from discrimination in the workplace
      • Requires eligible employers to make “reasonable accommodations” to allow employees to function properly on the job
      • Ensure that employers must treat all employees equally
    • The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) also gives you the right to take time off due to illness without losing your job
      • However, an employee must have worked for his or her employer for at least 12 months, including at least 1,250 hours during the most recent 12 months in order to qualify. The law applies to workers at all government agencies and schools nationwide as well as those at private companies with 50 or more employees within a 75-mile radius
    • The Federal Rehabilitation Act prohibits employers from discriminating against employees because they have cancer
      • However, this act applies only to employees of the federal government, as well as private and public employers who receive public funds

Sources: