Tag Archive for: awareness month

Spotlight On: National Cancer Research Month

Cancer research. It has taught us about risk factors, environmental factors, health screenings, causes, treatment options, metastasis, recurrence, rates of survival, and even how healthy cells might be used to wipe out the cancerous cells. Cancer research is broad and reaches far beyond the study of the infected cells. The research helps us to understand cancer and the many aspects of it that will affect the estimated 1,735,350 people who will be diagnosed with cancer in 2018, not to mention the millions already living with the disease. The years upon years of research devoted to cancer has led to valuable insight and life-saving measures. To emphasize the importance of the contributions of cancer research, the month of May was established as National Cancer Research Month and is led by the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). More information about National Cancer research month can be found here and here.

When it comes to cancer, the areas of research are vast. Many people may not know that there is more to cancer research than looking for treatments or a cure. To understand cancer, researchers spend years discovering how the disease forms, what environmental factors play a role, and what treatments might stop it. The types of research range from basic cancer research that studies the actual cancer cells to survivorship research that studies how cancer affects people after treatment. Database and population-based research are also critical to learning more about cancer. At cancer.ca the Canadian Cancer Society gives a thorough description of the various kinds of cancer research and the value they have which can be found here.

Once considered a hopeless disease, cancer plagued civilizations dating as far back as ancient Egypt, which you can read about here and here. However, it was in the early 1900s that worldwide cancer research began to offer a more clear understanding of the disease. Groups, like the AACR formed in 1910 and the Canadian Cancer Society formed in the 1930s, brought doctors and scientists together with the mission to search for ways to eradicate the disease and help improve the quality of life for those living with cancer. It was 1971 when President Nixon declared a war on cancer. The disease had become the second leading cause of death by 1970 and Nixon’s signing of the National Cancer Act of 1971 aimed to amplify the national efforts against cancer. The act established the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in its current form. Formerly created by the National Cancer Act of 1937 as the federal government’s agency for cancer research, the NCI was strengthened in 1971 with broader authority given to the director and more emphasis placed on research that included public and private partnerships, funding for additional cancer research facilities, and the creation of an international research data base. Today, the NCI is made up of about 3,500 people and 30 divisions, offices and centers all working to advance cancer research. The NCI, which calls itself the leader in the nation’s cancer research, reports that in the last few decades there have been declines in rates of new cancer and overall cancer deaths and that the number of cancer survivors in the United States more than doubled between 1992 and 2016 from 7 million to more than 15 million and the number is expected to rise to more than 26 million by 2040. More information about the NCI and it’s history can be found here and here and here.

For those affected by cancer, the research can be critical and today it is more accessible than ever. Research groups and advocacy organizations are available to patients and caregivers all day, every day through the internet. Data can be found, reviewed and discussed all from the comfort of your own home, favorite coffee shop, or wherever you have access to wifi thanks to programs such as the Patient Empowerment Network (PEN) Empowered Patient Chats , Patient Cafe , and Facebook groups. Not only are the patient resources increasing in number, they are increasing in value. “Online communities may be virtual, but they are no less real in terms of support and influence,” writes Marie Ennis-O’Connor in her September 2017 post for PEN’s Patients Helping Patients Blog. Ennis-O’Connor’s post, 12 Keys to Finding, Growing, and Nurturing Your Online Community, emphasizes the value of online communities to cancer patients when it comes to research, support, or any number of topics critical to ensure that patients stay informed, supported, and empowered.

Spotlight on National Minority Health Month

April is National Minority Health Month. Supported by Congress with a resolution in 2002, National Minority Health Month is meant to bring awareness to the disparities in health and healthcare among minorities. Led by the Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health, efforts are made to understand the disparities and the reasons they occur. The 2018 theme, Partnering for Health Equity, encourages organizations to come together to find solutions that will help equalize health for all races and ethnicities. More information and resources for National Minority Health Month can be found here.

Evidence of disparities in minority health exists in all major illnesses and diseases, including heart disease and diabetes. However, the disparities, compiled by aetna.com, related to cancers, clearly emphasize the impact on people’s lives. In the United States, African Americans have the highest death rate and shortest survival time of any other group of cancer patients. Cancer is the leading cause of death for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Heart disease is the leading cause of death for all other groups. According to cancer.gov, African American women have a higher incidence of aggressive breast cancer. American Indian and Alaskan Natives have higher rates of kidney cancer. Hispanic and African American women have higher rates of cervical cancer and die from it more often. More disparities can be found here and here.

There are a number of reasons believed to be involved in causing the disparities in minority health. They range from socio-economic status and environment to lack of scientific data about minority groups which results in disparities even in some of the most common healthcare screenings. For example, consumer.healthday.com reports, the guidelines that determine when women of average risk should begin screenings for breast cancer come mainly from the data gathered on white women. However, researchers discovered that those guidelines could delay detection in minority women, who tend to develop the disease at earlier ages. More about the study, which emphasizes the importance of understanding how cancer occurs in people of all ethnicities, can be found here.

Another reason for the existence of disparities could be biological. Researchers are looking into the occurrence of prostate cancer in African American men, who not only have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer, but they develop it at a younger age and tend to develop a more aggressive form of the disease. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities website, nimhd.nih.gov, researchers are studying why African American men are more at risk for prostate cancer and what can be done about it. Genetic makeup, access to healthcare, and environment are all being considered as factors. One study discovered that African American men and white men have a difference in the biomarkers that predict the aggressiveness of a prostate tumor. The study results are being tested further and expanded to look at other more factors and other biomarkers. More about the study can be found here.

There is much more to be learned about the disparities in minority health, why they exist, and how to prevent them. Increased attention and the increasing awareness of National Minority Health Month spotlights the need to eliminate the inequities in health for all races and ethnicities, which will empower us all.


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Cervical Cancer Awareness Month Feature

January is National Cervical Health Awareness Month, so we wanted to shine a light on this disease. Nearly 13,000 women in the United States are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year, but the disease can be preventable with vaccination and appropriate screening (Pap and HPV tests). It also can be cured when found early and treated. Women should start getting screened regularly, starting at age 21.

Two tests help prevent cervical cancer or find it early:

  • The Pap test (or Pap smear) looks for precancers, which are cell changes on the cervix that might become cervical cancer if they are not treated appropriately.
  • The HPV test looks for the virus that can cause these cell changes.

Pap Test

The Pap test is recommended for women between ages 21 and 65, and can be done in a doctor’s office or clinic. Women should start getting Pap tests regularly at age 21. If your Pap test results are normal, your doctor may say you can wait three years until your next Pap test. If you are 30 years old or older, you may choose to have an HPV test along with the Pap test. Your doctor can perform both the Pap and HPV tests at the same time. If your test results are normal, your chance of getting cervical cancer in the next few years is very low. Your doctor may then say you can wait as long as five years for your next screening.

If you have a low income or do not have health insurance, you may be able to get a free or low-cost Pap test through CDC’s National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program. Find out if you qualify.

HPV Vaccine

Get the HPV vaccine if you are in the age group for which it’s recommended. The HPV vaccine protects against the types of HPV that most often cause cervical, vaginal, and vulvar cancers. HPV can also cause cancers of the penis in men, and anal and head and neck cancers in both men and women.

The HPV vaccine is recommended for preteens (both boys and girls) aged 11 to 12 years, but can be given as early as age 9 and until age 26.

Make an appointment today for your or your child’s vaccination. If you don’t have insurance, or your insurance does not cover vaccines, CDC’s Vaccines for Children program may be able to help.

For a full list of awareness months please visit our Cancer Awareness Calendar 2018.

What Can You Do?

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services suggests using this month to spread the word about important steps women can take to stay healthy.

Here are just a few ideas:

  • Encourage women to get their well-woman visit this year.
  • Let women know that most insurance plans must cover well-woman visits and cervical cancer screening. This means that, depending on their insurance, women can get these services at no cost to them.
  • Talk to parents about how important it is for their pre-teens to get the HPV vaccine. Both boys and girls need the vaccine.

How can I help spread the word?

We’ve made it easier for you to make a difference. This toolkit is full of ideas to help you take action today. For example:


Resources:

https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/dcpc/resources/features/cervicalcancer/index.htm

http://www.nccc-online.org/

https://www.cancer.org/latest-news/special-coverage/cervical-health-awareness-month.html

https://healthfinder.gov/NHO/JanuaryToolkit.aspx