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Notable News July 2019

So much for the dog days of Summer. July was a super active Notable News month full of information. There are risks and recalls to be aware of, along with some very encouraging news about exciting new research and treatments. So, while you may not want to hear that you should probably consider getting a colonoscopy ASAP, you’ll be relieved to learn that some cancers may have much less invasive diagnostic tools on the horizon. Oh, and there are a couple links to some really interesting (although alarming) longer reads; just in case you’re embracing the dog days, and need some reading material, this summer.

Increased Cancer Risk

Colon cancer is on the rise for people younger than 50, reports cbsnews.com. The rate has increased over the past decade from 10 percent of all cases to about 12 percent. While there is no concrete explanation as to why colon cancer is increasing among the younger age group, one possibility is that it is linked to modern diets and the gut microbiome. Conversely, colon cancer rates are declining among those 50 and older, largely because of colonoscopy screenings which detect polyps before they become cancerous. Find out more below.

Breast implants that have been linked to cancer are being recalled, according to nytimes.com. The textured implants were banned in Europe late last year and are now being recalled in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The implants are linked to anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. It is a rare cancer of the immune system that develops in the tissue around the implant. Removing the implant and scar tissue around it is effective in curing the cancer in most cases, but if it is not found early it can spread and be deadly. Symptoms are swelling and fluid around the implant, and patients should have symptoms checked by their doctor. More information about the implants can be found below.

There is a link between radioactive iodine (RAI) treatment and cancer deaths, says cancer.gov. RAI has been commonly used to treat hyperthyroidism since the 1940s. An association between the dose of RAI treatment and long-term risk of death from cancers, including breast cancer, has been found in a study led by researchers at the National Cancer Institute. More research is needed to better understand the risks and the benefits of the treatments, but in the meantime, the information will help patients discuss hyperthyroid treatment options with their doctors. More information about the research can be found below.

Treatment and Detection

Immunotherapy may work in treating brain cancer, says medicalxpress.com. Researchers have found a way to make the CAR T immune therapy more effective against glioblastoma, the most common and most deadly form of brain cancer. Previous research showed that not all of the tumors could be targeted by the T cells. So, in order to more strategically target the tumors, researchers used a bi-specific T-cell engager, or “BiTE”, that makes it possible for CAR T cancer-killing cells to be sent to specific targets, making the treatment more effective. Learn more about the complicated, but promising, process below.

There may be a better, non-invasive way to detect bladder cancer, reports medicalnewstoday.com. Researchers in Spain have proposed using electronic tongues. The devices can detect or “taste” soluble compounds by using software and sensors. The tongues, used to analyze food, water, wine, and explosives, can also be used to detect diseases by testing samples of biofluid. Using the tongues to test urine samples could be an easy and inexpensive way to detect bladder cancer in the early stages. Learn more about the proposed tongue testing below.

Researchers may have found a new way to treat ovarian cancer, according to medicalnewstoday.com. Researchers have identified an enzyme known as IDH1 that encourages the growth of high-grade serous ovarian cancer, the most common form of ovarian cancer. The cancer is difficult to detect in early stages and hard to treat because it often develops a resistance to chemotherapy. Researchers found that when they blocked the IDH1 enzyme, the cancer cells were unable to divide and grow. The research also suggests that blocking the enzyme works on the cancer cells that have spread to other parts of the body as well as where the cancer originated. More information about this encouraging research can be found below.

Cancer-Causing Toxins

If you’ve never heard of ethylene oxide, you might want to consider reading the article ‘Residents Unaware of Cancer-Causing Toxins in Air’ from webmd.com. Ethylene oxide is an invisible chemical with no noticeable odor. It is used to sterilize medical equipment and make antifreeze, and it is on the EPA’s list of chemicals that definitely cause cancer. It is also an airborne toxin in areas that have been flagged as high-cancer risk, but many of the residents of those areas have no idea they are being exposed.

Another article worth reading this month can be found at huffpost.com. A new plastics plant is planning to come to an area in the middle of Louisiana’s “Cancer Alley”, and the residents, tired of cancer-causing chemical pollutants, are fighting back. Read about their path to empowerment below.


Resource Links:

cbsnews.com

Colon Cancer Study Finds Colon Cancer Rates Rising for Patients Under 50

nytimes.com

Breast Implants Linked to Rare Cancer Are Recalled Worldwide

cancer.gov

NCI study finds long-term increased risk of cancer death following common treatment for hyperthyroidism

medicalxpress.com

Immune therapy takes a ‘BiTE’ out of brain cancer

medicalnewstoday.com

‘Electronic tongues’ may help diagnose early stage bladder cancer

Could targeting this enzyme halt ovarian cancer?

webmd.com

Residents Unaware of Cancer-Causing Toxin in Air

huffpost.com

A Community In America’s ‘Cancer Alley’ Fights For Its Life Against A Plastics Plant

Notable News – June 2019

It’s official! The nation’s cancer mortality rate continues to decline, says cancer.gov. The finding was revealed in this year’s annual report regarding the status of cancer in the country. The report shows that cancer death rates have continued to decline in men, women, and children from 1999 to 2016. Specifically, lung, bladder, and larynx cancers are decreasing, which is attributed to the decline in tobacco use. Conversely, cancers related to obesity are increasing. The highest overall cancer incidence rates occurred in black men and white women. The lowest rates were among Asian/Pacific Islander men and women. In addition, researchers looked specifically at cancer trends among those aged 20 to 49. In this group women had higher cancer and death rates than men, which is the opposite of the data among all age groups. Breast cancer, thyroid cancer, and melanoma were identified as the most common cancers on the rise among 20 to 49 year old women. The report, published last month in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, is put together by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the American Cancer Society (ACS), and the North American Association of Central Registries (NAACCR). Find more detailed information about the annual report here.

The decline in cancer deaths just may have a lot to do with the amazing strides being made in understanding cancer and its risk factors, ways to diagnose it, and ways to treat it. Researchers at Yale have made a discovery about how metastasis, the spread of cancer, occurs on the molecular level that could lead to new ways of treating cancer, reports medicalexpress.com. While the study focused on renal cancer, understanding metastasis on the molecular level could lead to new testing and treatment for all types of cancer. Find more information about the study and the metastasis process here.

It’s important to know if you are at risk for certain cancers and having children through IVF may be one of them, reports thesun.co.uk. A 21-year study analyzing over 600,000 Danish women suggests that women who have had children using IVF are more likely to develop breast cancer. In addition, women who had their first child through IVF when they were 40 or older, were 65 percent more likely to develop breast cancer than women of the same age who conceived naturally. The drugs given to women during IVF to stimulate the ovaries may be the culprit. They increase levels of estrogen, a known factor in the occurrence of breast cancer. Make sure you are staying on top of your breast cancer screenings if you had children using IVF, and learn more about the study here.

Also reported by thesun.co.uk, is good news about early detection, specifically for prostate cancer. Scientists have developed a simple urine test that could show signs of prostate cancer five years early. The test, which could be available in as few as five years, looks for changes in specific genes. If the changes are noted, further testing is done. The process would mean that some men would not have to have invasive testing procedures and others would know of their prostate cancer risk earlier. Learn more about the promising new test here.

Finally, of interest this month is an article by theatlantic.com regarding the two technologies that are changing the future of cancer treatment, and the way in which oncologists are looking at treating the disease. The article points to immunotherapy and CAR T-cell therapy as kindler, gentler approaches to cancer treatment. Chemotherapy, which is the most successful treatment to date, as the article points out, can make the treatment process brutal. Oncologists are turning to the new therapies to treat cancer without the harsh side effects that come with chemo. The article is a quick read and it provides hope for anyone who is or may be affected by cancer. That means all of us. Check it out here.

Notable News – July 2018

There is some seriously risky business being reported in July. Meal times, diabetes, and bitter-taste sensitivity are all now being linked to a higher risk of cancer. Not to mention what researchers say the risks of complementary medicines might be.

There was another significant risk factor recently revealed, says dailymail.co.uk. A study of 20 million people conducted by Oxford University found that having diabetes increases your risk of cancer. Women with diabetes were 27 percent more likely to develop cancer and men were 19 percent more likely. The study, which included both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, showed that women with diabetes were more likely to develop leukemia and kidney, oral and stomach cancers. The men had a higher risk for developing liver cancer. Diabetes also puts people at risk for heart attacks, strokes, and dementia. You can read more about the findings and diabetes risks here.

Still another new cancer risk factor for women was reported by sciencedaily.com. It was discovered that women who have a high sensitivity to bitter taste also have a high cancer risk. The study tracked the diet, lifestyle, and health of 5,500 British women for 20 years. The women were divided into three categories of bitter sensitivity: super-tasters, tasters and non-tasters. The super-tasters had a 58 percent greater risk and the tasters had a 40 percent greater risk of developing cancer than the non-tasters. Researchers hypothesized that lower vegetable consumption would be a cause for the significant increase in cancer risk for the tasters and super-tasters, but their theory was not proved by the research. Researchers continue to suspect a relationship between diet and cancer risk and hope to further study the overall diet of the tasters and super-tasters to try to determine the connection. More details about the study can be found here.

Alternative medicine may not put you at risk for cancer, but it may increase your risk of dying from it, reports nbcnews.com. A study done by the Yale Cancer Center found that treatments commonly referred to as complementary medicine, including the use of herbs and homeopathy, aren’t harmful when used with standard, conventional cancer treatments, but if the complementary treatments are used instead of the conventional treatments, patients are twice as likely to die from their cancer. The patients who were most likely to use the alternative treatments were young, affluent women and the researchers noted that doctors should use the information from the study to make sure they are meeting the needs of their patients who may turn down standard treatment in favor of alternative treatments. Researchers also acknowledged that alternative treatments such as yoga, acupuncture, and meditation can help to improve a patients quality of life and if they make the patient feel better they should be encouraged to use complementary medicine in addition to conventional treatments. You can read more here.

Make sure you aren’t at risk of missing out on the latest and most compelling cancer-related information. You can find it all here at powerfulpatients.org.

Notable News: February 2018

Sometimes, even the most seemingly unrelated of symptoms can be a warning sign of cancer, says nytimes.com. While some might associate depression as a side effect of cancer, it can actually be a sign of cancer growth in the body. Some cancers actually trigger depressive symptoms. The phenomenon was first noted in 1931 with pancreatic cancer patients and more recent research supports the findings. The invasion of the cancer cells causes the body to release cytokines which are messenger chemicals that when released by certain cancers create an inflammatory immune response in the body along with the neurological response that causes depression. The theory is that when the cancer is removed from the body, the depression will gradually be reversed. This story emphasizes the importance of listening to your body and not ignoring symptoms that something more serious might be going on. Learn more here.

A new treatment for a common, but often not discussed side effect of breast cancer is showing positive results, says npr.org. Lymphedema, a condition that is common after cancer treatment, can cause painful swelling of the soft tissue of the arms and legs and can increase the risk of infection and can be life threatening. It is often the result of the removal of lymph nodes and radiation used to treat cancer. Some surgeons are experimenting with repairing or recreating a healthy lymph system for patients who develop lymphedema. The surgery, which has been around for about ten years, but has recently been perfected due to advances in body imaging, involves transferring lymph nodes from parts of the body that weren’t affected by the cancer treatment. Another type of surgery is designed to prevent lymphedema altogether. When the lymph nodes are removed, instead of cutting off the vessels they are reattached to a vein so that the drainage system has as little interruption as possible and the risk of lymphedema is reduced. You’ll find more about lymphedema, the surgeries to prevent it, and some patient stories here.

There’s new research from the National Cancer Institute, says dailymail.co.uk, that might make you stand up and take notice. It turns out that even just one hour of sitting increases your risk of getting nine types of cancer, including lung, and head or neck, in addition to breast and colon cancers. The information was reported at the American Association for the Advancement of Science conference in Austin, Texas earlier this month by Charles E. Matthews, an epidemiologist at the National Cancer Institute. Matthews says that eliminating health risks requires four to five times more exercise than previously thought. While exercising more is important, says Matthews, even more important is less sitting. Matthews recommends adding in light household chores or taking a walk instead of watching television. Get more information here and you can also watch a short video reporting the findings here.

Finally, February is Cancer Prevention Month. According to moffitt.org, research and studies continue to show that the majority of cancers are the result of lifestyle choices and environmental factors that could be changed or avoided to prevent between 70 to 90 percent of the gene mutations that cause cancer. Fortunately, some of the ways to prevent cancer are pretty easy and painless. You can find six strategies from Moffitt Cancer Centers here and seven tips from mayoclinic.org here. Of course, whether it comes to prevention, treatment, or support, you will find some of the best resources available right here with Patient Empowerment Network. Check out our programs here.

Reducing Your Risk of Cancer

The American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) estimates that approximately one-third of cases of the most common cancers in the U.S. could be prevented, which accounts for about 374,000 cases of cancer per year. Cancer prevention is action taken to lower the chance of getting cancer therefore reducing the burden and deaths from cancer each year. Since February is Cancer Prevention Month, we wanted to highlight some ways to reduce your risk and protect yourself from cancer.

1. Eat a healthy diet & Stay active

Eating a balanced plant-based diet filled with a variety of vegetables, fruits, soy, nuts, whole grains, and beans can help lower your risk for many types of cancer and will help you maintain a healthy weight.

Adults should get et at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous intensity activity each day (or a combination of these), preferably spread throughout the week. While children and teens are recommended to get at least 1 hour of moderate or vigorous intensity activity each day, with at least 2.5 hours of moderate intensity aerobic activity each week.

2. Protect yourself from the sun

Sun exposure at any age can cause skin cancer. Be especially careful in the sun if you burn easily, spend a lot of time outdoors, or have any of the following physical features:

  • Numerous, irregular, or large moles
  • Freckles
  • Fair skin
  • Blond, red, or light brown hair

To block UV rays try covering-up, wearing sunscreen, wearing a hat, using UV-absorbent shades, and limiting you exposure time.

3. Get immunized

The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine helps prevent most cervical cancers and several other kinds of cancer, and the hepatitis B vaccine can help lower liver cancer risk.

4. Avoid risky behavior

Another effective cancer prevention tactic is to avoid risky behaviors that can lead to infections that, in turn, might increase the risk of cancer. Some behaviors to avoid:

  • Excessive alcohol consumption
  • Tanning beds
  • Tobacco use
  • Unsafe sex
  • Sharing needles

5. Get regular medical care and screenings

Along with regular check-ups with your physician to maintain an open health dialogue, cancer screenings should also be scheduled. These include the following:

  • Pap smear – Most women ages 21 to 65 should get Pap tests as part of routine health care. Even if you are not currently sexually active, you should still have a Pap test
  • Colonoscopy – Colon cancer screening should begin at age 50 for most people. If a colonoscopy doesn’t find adenomas or cancer and you don’t have risk factors, the next test should be in ten years.
  • Mammogram – Women should should get mammograms every year starting at age 40, for as long as a woman is in good health
  • Checking skin for irregular moles, etc.

Sources:

https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/dcpc/prevention/

http://www.mcancer.org/cancer-prevention

http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/in-depth/cancer-prevention/art-20044816

https://www.osha.gov/Publications/OSHA3166/osha3166.html