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Post-Cancer Side Effects: What to Expect

This video was originally published by the American Cancer Society on June 18, 2014, here.

After treatment ends, many cancer survivors must still learn to deal with different side effects. Dr. Richard Wender of the American Cancer Society explains what survivors can expect and how they can manage.

Cancer Survivorship Plans

This video was originally published by the American Cancer Society on June 18, 2014, here.

After your doctor declares you cancer-free, you still may have a long road ahead. Dr. Richard Wender of the American Cancer Society explains how a cancer survivor care plan can help guide you after treatment ends.

Notable News – December 2018

Here we are on the cusp of another trip around the sun, and we have the opportunity to look forward to what the new year may bring. According to cancer.gov and cdc.gov, statistics found here and here, are encouraging when it comes to cancer survival rates. The number of cancer survivors in the United States is expected to reach 20.3 million by 2026. That’s good news for the 38.4 percent of men and women in the US that will receive a cancer diagnosis at some point in their lifetimes. Of course, surviving cancer can be costly. Expenditures for cancer care, which were $147.3 billion in 2017, are expected to increase in the coming years thanks to factors such as a population that is aging and new and costlier treatments which are implemented as standards of care. While cancer care is expensive, it seems to be effective. The overall cancer death rate has been steadily declining in the US since the 1990s. In fact, from 1991 to 2015, the overall cancer death rate fell 26 percent. According to cdc.gov, by 2020 the cancer death rates are expected to drop the most for prostate cancer, colorectal cancer, lung cancer, female breast cancer, oral cancers, cervical cancers, and melanoma. With the death rate falling and the survivor rate increasing it’s clear that, over the past several years, progress has been made to effectively prevent and treat the disease. Fortunately, it looks like 2019 will follow that trend.

There are two promising cancer treatment developments this month, reports medicalnewstoday.com. The first one helps prevent the spread of cancer after surgery. A spray-on gel being developed could help stop the recurrence and spread of cancer tumors after surgery when it is applied to the surgery site. The gel is full of drugs that activate the immune system to prevent the return of the cancer. Testing done on mice has been promising. It prevented the recurrence of cancer at the surgery site and prevented tumors from forming in other areas of the body. You can find more details about the promising gel here.

The second development is an exciting combination of medications that may prevent tumor growth. A couple of years ago, researchers in Switzerland figured out that by combining metformin, a drug used to treat diabetes, with syrosingopine, a blood pressure drug, they could prevent cancer tumors from growing. The combination of the two drugs kills the cancer cells by cutting off their energy supply. You can learn more about how this dynamic drug duo works together to sock it to cancer here.

There’s also good news regarding breast cancer this month, reports standard.co.uk. This is really good news because it gives hope to women with one of the most aggressive forms of breast cancer. There aren’t many treatment options for triple negative breast cancer, but targeted antibody therapies might change that. Triple negative breast cancer does not respond to hormone treatment so patients have to be treated with surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. The targeted antibody therapy would activate the patient’s immune system to fight the tumor. More about this exciting and developing treatment can be found here.

Of course, the best news of all comes when the cancer is no longer detectable, and that’s exactly what happened for a Texas girl this month, reports abc7chicago.com. The 11 year old had a rare and inoperable brain tumor, and she went through weeks of radiation. The radiation can stabilize or shrink the tumor and is the only course of treatment, but there is no cure. Inexplicably, the girl’s scans revealed that the tumor was no longer visible. While doctors call this case extraordinary, they say the long-term prognosis has not changed, and the tumor will likely grow back. In the mean time, the family says they prayed for a miracle and got it. More about this remarkable story, and a video, can be found here.

As we ring in 2019, let’s hope for more encouraging research and remarkable stories, and a day when all cancers disappear.

Self-Care During Illness: 
Tips for Cancer Survivors

Self-care is essential for all of us; it’s something that allows you to take a mental health break while also making sure your body is in good shape. After a period of stress or anxiety, you need a little time to heal and get yourself back to a good place. This is especially true for cancer survivors, who battle stress, physical pain, anxiety, depression, and worry every day. Cancer comes in many different forms and affects the body and mind in different ways, meaning no two people will handle it the same way. What works for you when it comes to coping may not work for someone else, and vice versa.

Fortunately, there are many different ways you can learn to cope with your feelings and take a time-out. From daily exercise to learning to listen to your body’s cues, self-care involves a variety of activities for you to choose from. You may choose to practice self-care alone or with a close friend; you can do it from the comfort of your own home or at the gym. Whatever makes you feel good in a healthy way is classified as self-care.

Keep reading for some great tips on how to practice self-care as a cancer survivor.

Take Your Medication as Directed

Most cancer survivors need medication to help with pain, nausea, and other symptoms that will make daily life a little easier. Some take several different medications every day, and it’s imperative to keep track of these and make sure you’re taking them correctly. You might use an app on your phone to help you remember what time you need to take specific pills, or invest in a sorter that will keep all your medicines measured out for each day.

If you feel that the dosage on a medication isn’t right, talk to your doctor immediately rather than attempting to change the dosage yourself or discontinuing use. Because many of these can be habit-forming, using them correctly is important not just in maintaining your health, but because opioids can be highly addictive and can cause many more issues than they treat if used incorrectly.

If you’re concerned about using prescription medication like opioids to treat your pain and nausea, it’s worth talking to your doctor about the option of CBD. It’s a natural, non-narcotic and non-hallucinogenic treatment that provides relief for many of cancer’s most troubling side effects, such as muscle pain, nausea and anxiety. As with any treatment, be sure to consult your physician before giving it a try.

Eat Well

Sometimes, medication or chemotherapy can interfere with appetite, making it extra important to make sure you’re eating well when you are hungry. Try to eat small snacks throughout the day made up of whole, unprocessed foods, and remember to stay hydrated. Talk to your doctor about the best foods for your body’s needs, and consider hitting up the farmers market for fresh produce as often as you can.

Make Your Needs a Priority

Many individuals who are faced with a battle against cancer find that they are so focused on the people around them that they rarely take time out for their own needs. You may be worried about how your family will pay for treatment or how your illness is affecting your children. While these are valid concerns, one of the best ways to help ease your mind is to take a little time for yourself. Go for a short hike, sit down with a good book, or lie in bed and listen to your favorite music. Learning how to slow down and reset your mind isn’t always easy, but it’s necessary.

Try Something New

As long as you have the energy for it, now is the perfect time to try something new. Finding something that is enjoyable and allows you to shake off worry or anxiety for a while is a great way to take care of yourself. Whether you want to learn a new language or travel to a place you’ve never been, don’t put it off. Just make sure your health won’t be affected negatively, and talk to your doctor before making any major plans.

Taking care of yourself can be a big job, so remember that there are only so many things you can do in a day. You might try yoga and meditation during this time to learn how to practice mindfulness and focus on the present; this can help you cope with stress in the moment so that you can turn your mind to more important things.

National Cancer Survivors Day 2017 is Sunday, June 4th

On Sunday, June 4, 2017, tens of thousands of people across the globe will gather in their local communities to honor cancer survivors and to raise awareness of the ongoing challenges of cancer survivorship. This day will mark the 30th annual National Cancer Survivors Day. The day is meant to “demonstrate that life after a cancer diagnosis can be a reality”.

National Cancer Survivors Day presents an opportunity for all people living with a history of cancer to connect with each other, celebrate milestones, and recognize those who have supported them along the way. It is also a day to draw attention to the ongoing challenges of cancer survivorship with the aim of promoting more resources, research, and survivor-friendly legislation to improve cancer survivors’ quality of life.

Save the date, and make a plan to celebrate National Cancer Survivors Day with the cancer survivors in your community on Sunday, June 4, 2017.

Anyone can host a National Cancer Survivors Day celebration. If you want to host an NCSD 2017 event in your city, be sure to sign up for National Cancer Survivors Day eNews. Then you’ll be among the first to receive NCSD 2017 registration information and planning materials once they are released.


Source: http://www.ncsd.org/