Tag Archive for: education

How Can We Address Disparities in AML Among Diverse Populations?

How Can We Address Disparities in AML Among Diverse Populations? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

What do acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients need to know about care disparities? Dr. Catherine Lai from Penn Medicine discusses ethnic disparities and other factors. Learn about factors in AML care disparities and some available resources for patients to elevate their care.

[ACT]IVATION TIP from Dr. Lai: “Speak with your social worker, is there a resource that I can tap into that can help me with my care so that I can make sure that I can get the best access?”

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Transcript: 

Art:

Dr. Lai, how can we address disparities in AML among diverse populations?

Dr. Catherine Lai:

So this is an extremely important topic. And there was a large study that was recently published out of Chicago that looked at the different hospitals in the area and to look at ethnic disparities between white and Black populations and did find significant differences. Unfortunately, I would say that there are many factors that go into this, and a large portion of it is education and resources, and so what I would say is that we…we need to, as physicians and also the community, be better about educating our patients and being able to have access to resources so that everybody can get the same treatment.

And so involving other societies who support cancer to just get the word out that we need to…that we need to be aware of the differences so that we can address them specifically and make sure that for patients who don’t have resources that we are able to provide for them. So the activation tip here is that asking about resources, but we use a lot of Leukemia & Lymphoma Society grants that help our patients get access to and lower the cost of drugs, but also will…they will also provide grants just to help with cost of living, occasionally, there are other societies that can help with ride shares, and so I think even if you don’t know the specific…the specific society that can help, just asking to speak with your social worker, is there a resource that I can tap into that can help her help me with my care so that I can make sure that I can get the best access?

Where Can CLL Patients Access Financial Support?

Where Can CLL Patients Access Financial Support? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Is there patient financial assistance for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) treatments? CLL expert Dr. Seema Bhat shares resources and advice for accessing support.

Seema Bhat, MD is a hematologist at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – The James. Learn more about Dr. Bhat.

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Transcript:

Katherine:  

Financial concerns can be another source of stress for people with CLL. Obviously, everyone’s situation is different, of course, but what resources are available for patients who need financial support? 

Dr. Bhat:  

So, financial barriers can be a real concern for our patients. Targeted therapies are very expensive, and although insurances do cover them, the approved FDA drugs, copays can be very high, and this adds on because our patients with – our treatments with CLL, some of them tend to be indefinite. That means patients have to take those medications on an ongoing basis, and when they face such situations, high copays, we look into financial assistance. We look for funding for copay assistance, and funding can be provided by pharmaceutical companies. We can also apply for grants through The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society and other resources to help out our patients with these financial concerns.  

Katherine:  

So, does the patient work with the healthcare team to find financial support? 

Dr. Bhat:  

Absolutely. We at our institution have what is called, “MAP,” or Medication Assistance Program. 

And when we see that – we run the medications through the insurance, then we see the copay is high, we refer our patients to the MAP program, and then they take over. They find them grants, they find them assistance through be it pharmaceuticals, copay assistance programs. So, invariably, almost all patients who come and see us are helped through that program.  

Katherine:  

What about a nurse navigator or patient navigator? What do they do? How can they help?  

Dr. Bhat:

Well, so yes. Nurse navigators and patient navigators are also very important for caring for our patients. So, patients can have, besides our care for our patients which includes caring for their disease, caring for their symptoms, caring for their reduced hemoglobin and reduced platelets, our symptom management, they have psychological needs, they have functional needs, they have needs like family support. 

So, these are all the things that patient navigators can help patients set that up based on their – we have patients who travel from out of state, are from two or three hours away. So, these patient navigators look into what resources they should have available locally. Sometimes, patient navigators help us – some patients cannot do frequent travels back and forth, so we get them connected to local oncologists, also. So, patient navigators look into those appointments, look into those offices, so they provide a lot of help to us manage our patients. So, they provide more of a holistic management, rather than just treatment of CLL. 

What Is the Importance of Culturally Competent Care?

What Is the Importance of Culturally Competent Care? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Culturally competent care is another way to work toward health equity. Dr. Nicole Rochester and Aswita Tan-McGrory discuss barriers to providing culturally competent care and ways to address the issues.

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Transcript:

Dr. Nicole Rochester:

We know that due to structural racism, due to inequities, not everybody has access to fresh fruits and vegetables, healthy foods, not everyone has access to green spaces, nice parks where they can go outside and have safety and exercise, and that’s something that we’re being made increasingly aware of is how these social determinants of health impact healthcare. So I want to move and start to talk about the importance of culturally competent care, or I like to call it cultural humility, I don’t know that we can really ever be competent in someone else’s culture. But I want to talk about how those come together, this idea of being respectful and sensitive and aware of an individual’s culture and how that connects to some of the health inequities that we experience. So, Aswita, I know this is an area of expertise for you, so I’d love for you to chime in.

Aswita Tan-McGrory, MBA, MSPH:

Yeah, I mean, I would love it if every physician or nurse or PA started the conversation, what has been the biggest challenge for you in the last six months? If you ask that question, I mean, well the patient will be like, “Oh my God.” And not around just medical issues, they all align, right? If you don’t have housing, you’re going to have medical stress, like Broderick said. I’m just calm listening to you, so I’m going to guess that you have is really positive vibe that’s probably missing for many of us because we aren’t practicing the things that you encourage. And so I would just say that it’s really difficult in the system like I said, we set up, and we mentioned 15 minutes, doctors don’t feel like they have time to ask that question, but you’re doing it in other ways, we implement social determinants of health screening. Well, that’s really that question, right? But you formalize it because it’s not happening, so now it becomes like a screening question. And I will just say that we’re very narrow-minded in our view. I think I have seen a change in the very beginning when we started the work in our center in 2006, a lot of pushback was around thinking about what happens in the patient outside of our walls. It said,  “Well, I didn’t go to medical school to solve the problem of housing, I didn’t go to medical school to figure out how to get somebody on benefits.” And I think the healthcare system realized it doesn’t matter what you do in the hospital, it will be undone when they get home to a situation where they can’t maintain it, they can’t provide that support, they don’t…

They’re stressed out, they have mental health issues, so I think they’re finally getting there. But I think just acknowledging that the person in front of you has different experiences based on language, education, gender, ability, sexual orientation…I don’t think that’s a bad thing. I think you just need to own it, we’re working on it. So I do it better than others, but I don’t know any healthcare system, honestly, that’s nailed this to the way that we probably should, so…I’m with you, Broderick. We don’t do this very well, and most of my job includes dismantling these systems that we built to benefit the people in power and leave everybody else behind, and so that’s been really the focus in our work.