Tag Archive for: elevated platelets

Living With an MPN and Being Your Own Best Advocate

Living With an MPN and Being Your Own Best Advocate from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

 MPN patient Rita experienced an extended path to her diagnosis. Watch as she shares her patient journey of varied symptoms, how self-advocacy and self-education assisted in her care, and her tips on how to empower yourself as a patient. In Rita’s words, “Don’t feel bad about advocating for yourself. Your doctor has many patients, but you have only one you.”

See More from Best MPN Care

Related Resources:

How Can MPN Patients Become More Proactive in Their Care?

My Polycythemia Vera Journey to Empowerment

How Can MPN Patients Stay Up to Date With New Treatments?


Transcript:

My name is Rita, and I was diagnosed with polycythemia vera in March 2019 after nearly three years of wide-ranging symptoms. Like many patients, my path to diagnosis was long and required me to self-advocate.

I was generally healthy until my symptoms of polycythemia vera began. I first experienced one episode of neck, jaw and chest discomfort, and the hospital blood test showed somewhat elevated platelets, and elevated red cell distribution width (RDW); but the doctors weren’t concerned. Next, I started getting optical migraines that were also dismissed. These were followed by incidents of feeling weak and sweaty; some days with headaches, dizziness, and fatigue; and also looking like I had a sunburn on my face with bloodshot eyes. I dismissed these symptoms. Then I started feeling short of breath at times, especially lying down, and experienced intermittent stabbing underneath my left lower chest area.

After having blood tests done, I had to call to find out my results that showed high hemoglobin, high red blood cells, and high hematocrit levels. After I Googled my test results, the first thing that came up was polycythemia vera. Experiencing additional vision issues, abnormal blood test results, chest pressure, and “foggy headedness” that frightened me, my doctor finally referred me to a hematologist who confirmed my suspicions with a PV diagnosis.

Some things I have learned during my MPN journey include:

  • We need to feel comfortable advocating for ourselves, and we need to make sure our doctors are open to being our partner in healthcare rather than our ‘boss’ in health care.
  • We also need to educate doctors that what looks like “dehydration” on a CBC could actually be a rare blood cancer. 
  • Get copies of your own blood test results, X-rays, other medical reports, etc., and, within reason, try to learn what they mean.
  • Diagnosed patients should be allowed to self-refer to an MPN specialist rather than be dependent on their physicians to do it. 
  • We need to self-advocate as “women of a certain age” to make sure we’re not medically or symptomatically reduced to “it’s menopause.”
  • Be careful how you express yourself to your doctor, because a careless comment may throw off your path to a correct diagnosis.
  • Don’t feel bad about advocating for yourself. Your doctor has many patients, but you have only one you. 

These actions are key to staying on your path to empowerment.

My MPN Journey, Getting the Best Care After ET and MF Diagnoses

My MPN Journey, Getting the Best Care After ET and MF Diagnoses from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Myelofibrosis and essential thrombocythemia (ET) patient Julia had experience as a health educator and hospital administrator before receiving her MPN diagnosis. Watch as she shares how she later connected the dots from her symptoms and blood work, lessons learned about myelofibrosis patient journeys, and her advice for living well with MPNs.

Related Resources:

Expert Advice for Learning About Your MPNs Online

MPN Caregivers: How to Provide Support During Appointments


Transcript:

Julia:

My name is Julia, I was diagnosed with essential Thrombocythemia in 2007, and then with myelofibrosis a year later, after a routine blood work. The diagnosis came out of nowhere. I was healthy and active prior to my diagnosis and raising five children with my husband. I’ll never forget the day I received a voicemail from my primary care doctor’s office, I really couldn’t believe what I was hearing. I didn’t have time for this illness in my life. I had a bone marrow biopsy that showed I was positive for JAK2 and had a 5q deletion genetic mutation. I started on daily aspirin, and it was a hard pill to swallow for many reasons.

As a certified health educator and former hospital administrator, I understood the importance of treating a rare disease, but I had a difficult time with the idea of taking medicine daily, and I felt like I didn’t have any symptoms. I reviewed my old lab print-outs that showed elevated platelets 15 years before, that slowly increased over time. I recall having severe migraines that would put me out of commission for the day, and tenacious fatigue in the years before, I didn’t connect the dots with the symptoms, and neither did my oncologist. By 2007, my platelets and white blood cells were very high.

I decided to find an expert with extensive experience with ET and MF to get top-notch monitoring and treatment. I connected with a specialist for many years and hope to keep living with my disease for many years ahead. I’ve had several hospitalizations and ER visits over the years, but keep on going. MF has absolutely changed the path of my life and how I live it, but I still do most of what I want to do while I’ve been lucky in maintaining stable myelofibrosis with no true signs of disease progression or serious myelofibrosis complications, it’s important to understand the path for other myelofibrosis patients might be quite different.

My advice for others MPN patients is:

  • Pay attention to how you feel and pace yourself
  • Keep track of your blood counts, so you can alert your care team
  • Find an MPN specialist for your care
  • Don’t forget to be present and spend time with your family.

These actions are key to staying on your path to empowerment