Tag Archive for: high PSA

Are Mobile-Optimized Tools Making an Impact in Prostate Cancer?

Are Mobile-Optimized Tools Making an Impact in Prostate Cancer? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Prostate cancer screening can now be accessed via some mobile methods. Dr. Heather Cheng from Seattle Cancer Care Alliance shares information about mobile-optimized tools and access – and how mobile access is working toward health equity.

See More from Prostate Cancer TelemEDucation

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Transcript:

Sherea Cary:

Can you speak to any mobile-optimized tools making a difference in prostate cancer?

Dr. Heather Cheng:

So, I don’t know specifically about…well, I can speak about some efforts I know about, but I think the mobile options are really a great idea. And I think the way I would think about it is, there are maybe…and I know this is the case, for example, mammograms. But I know that there can be traveling clinics where they may offer, for example, the prostate-specific antigen blood tests, which can be used as a screening to determine if somebody might have prostate cancer, and that might be something that somebody otherwise is really busy and doesn’t necessarily have access to. Usually, it’s something that is done by the primary care provider but can be done through mobile access, and I think some of the procedures could be done like blood tests for prostate cancer, I think to get an actual diagnosis to really be confident that there is prostate cancer, not something that’s just causing the PSA, that blood test could be high. Sometimes people can have a high PSA without cancer, and so it’s important to actually get a biopsy to help be more confident and know for sure that there’s cancer. That’s usually done in a clinic, but the screening, meaning the sort of trying to figure out if somebody’s at higher risk or not can be done in a mobile van, and I think there are a number of many excellent programs around the country, not enough, probably, but whose mission it is to try to improve access to cancer screening.

Prostate Cancer Survivor Thrives After Unexpected Diagnosis

Prostate Cancer Survivor Thrives After Unexpected Diagnosis from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Prostate cancer patient Theo received a shocking prostate cancer diagnosis six years after a biopsy following a high PSA. Watch as he shares his cancer journey and advice to other prostate cancer patients.

See More From Best Prostate Cancer Care No Matter Where You Live


Transcript:

My name is Theo, and I live in Akron, Ohio. In 2009, I was diagnosed with prostate cancer. At 52 years old, this came as a shock as I took good care of myself and worked out regularly. Prior to that, I had a biopsy in 2003 following a high PSA diagnosed by my primary physician.

After the biopsy, no follow-up with care was recommended. I was not asked to return or contacted again by the urologist’s office. When I met with a urologist in 2009, the biopsy showed cancer with a Gleason score of 7. The doctor showed me a chart that revealed I had eleven years to live. I immediately thought of my oldest grandchild, and wondered if I’d be around to see him grow up. I was in disbelief and stunned.

I opted to have surgery following my diagnosis, and though my PSA was then down below one, it began to climb. I followed up with radiation for seven weeks, but my PSA started to climb after completing radiation. Ever since, I have been seeing my medical oncologist every 3 months since 2010.

Since 2019, my PSA has gone up and down but has gone from 53 in May of 2019 to 57 in December of 2020. My doctor has advised not starting hormone treatments until metastasis is found. Confident in my care, I agreed with that advice. I soon discovered that I was not alone. After speaking with members of my church, I discovered other men faced the same diagnosis and varied experiences.

Soon, time became more precious. I was fortunate to have my family with me every step of the way. Seven grandchildren later, that eleven years has now turned into 12 years.

My advice for other prostate cancer patients:

  • Be aware that your care team members may have biased opinions based on their fields of expertise.
  • Discuss all options with each treatment specialist prior to deciding which course of action to take.
  • Connect with others, it can be comforting to know that you share the same experience.

These actions are key to staying on your path to empowerment.