Tag Archive for: meditation

Compassion Meditation

Compassion Meditation from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

 Learn about cultivating love and tenderness towards others and bolstering feelings of connectedness as well as understanding and acceptance of others. Support your overall psychological and emotional well-being. Watch now.

See More from Rx for Community Wellness

Transcript:

Greetings everyone. Thank you for joining this Patient Empowerment Network program. In this practice session we will be focusing our attention on directing compassion towards another.

Compassion is having tenderness towards someone who is suffering along with a heartfelt desire to alleviate their suffering. In this practice we will be offering this compassion towards someone who is dear to ourselves. Bring to mind someone in your life who is suffering. Someone is going through challenging time. Who may be struggling with discomfort or distress? Picture them in your mind and allow yourself to feel a tender caring for their wellbeing. Allow yourself to hold them in your heart. Feeling their presence.

To your level of comfort, allow yourself to feel into their discomfort, their pain, their suffering. Doing so without overwhelming yourself with their pain, with their suffering. So, doing so to your level of comfort. Feeling your heart continuing to open to them. Wishing them well. Extending your tenderness and compassion towards them in their pain and wishing them well. Wishing them well. Repeating the following phrases or modify them to meet your heart’s sincere desire for their wellbeing: May you be held in compassion, May your pain and sorrow be eased, May your heart be at peace, May you be free from suffering.

Again, you modify any of those phrases that are suitable for your desire for their wellbeing. Repeating to yourself with a tender heart. Bringing this practice to a close. Releasing the phrases and noticing how you feel. Gently open your eyes. We hope you have enjoyed this Patient Empowerment Network program

Is Whole Patient Care a Path to Health Equity?

As part of our Patient Empowerment Network (PEN) Path to Empowerment, whole patient support is included in the path for patients. Our advocacy program called Rx for Community Wellness focuses on culturally competent whole person healthcare that treats the whole patient in tandem with existing care while also looking at health equity issues. As we prepare to launch into another series of Wellness Rx Meditation and Wellness Rx Nutrition programs, here’s a look at the programs and resources that are already available. The intention of these resources are to improve cancer care for all patients by providing meaningful mind-body tools that maximize well-being.

Equity Rx Webinars 

Unfortunately, not every patient is starting from the same level in their healthcare. Health equity topics must be addressed to achieve equitable care for all, and the Equity Rx webinar series have provided an opportunity to address some of these issues. In the Equity Rx webinars, we pulled together a panel that included a cancer survivor, a naturopathic doctor, and a public health scientist. The panel members discussed the importance of culturally competent whole person cancer care to work toward improved cancer outcomes for all patients. Some of the topics covered in the Equity Rx webinars include: 

  • Ways that healthcare systems can better work toward whole person care
  • Solutions to help overcome trauma and lack of trust to work toward healing
  • Advice from a cancer survivor on how to work toward optimal patient care
  • The effects of stress, anxiety, and depression on physical health
  • How environmental conditions and personal experiences can impact health
  • Existing barriers to diagnosis and a patient’s experience as a Mexican American
  • Barriers to culturally competent care and how to address barrier issues
  • Factors that whole person care examines and obstacles healthcare systems   pose to patient care

Survey feedback about the Equity Rx and Wellness Rx Meditative and Nutritional Tools have been extremely positive with 90.2% of survey respondents believing this program has given them a better understanding of the need for health equity. As more people become aware of health equity issues, they can also advocate on behalf of others to improve care for all patients. 

In addition, 82.7% of survey respondents agreed they are very likely to share their story with others to raise awareness about the need for equitable care after the Equity Rx program. And through the process of sharing their personal experiences, patients can not only help educate others but may also be able to work through some of the emotional load of their cancer journeys.

One survey respondent also came away from the programs with motivation to add holistic care to part of their care team.

My hematologist is pretty responsive, but I don’t have a holistic doctor, and I’d like to get one. This program definitely raised my awareness of equity issues. Sasha was great explaining her issues. Thank you!

Another survey respondent shared how the programs instilled motivation to take a more active role in their care.

I will make more of an effort to get my team members to read information that has been shared on my tests and progress.

Equity Rx Crowdsourced Resource Guide

PEN recognizes the value of educational resources and in gathering input from a wide selection of people – whether they are patients, care partners, or patient advocates. In the printable and downloadable Equity Rx Crowdsourced Resource Guide, whole person care is described with an explanation of why whole person care is important in improving health outcomes for all patients. Equity Rx survey highlights are also shown in easy-to-read graphics in the resource guide along with crowdsourced solutions for working toward equitable healthcare.

Is Whole Patient Care a Path to Health Equity?

Wellness Rx Meditative and Nutritional Tools

Whole person care is a primary tenet of holistic medicine, and nutrition and meditation practices are two ways to incorporate holistic care. Holistic care is one way that can support patients in maintaining healthy minds and bodies. In the Wellness Rx Meditative and Nutritional Tools, we created educational videos and transcripts to improve knowledge about meditation practices and nutrition to boost patient health. Meditation topics that were covered in the series include breathing, abdominal breath, chest breathing, body parts, body scan, complete breathing, joy, whole body, heart center, and breath counting. While nutrition topics covered in the series include the benefits of vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates, fats, protein, and plant-based diets. 

Access to health and wellness options are vital for all patients. We at PEN hope you can take advantage of the Rx for Community Wellness program resources and also share them with others to improve their care. Additional webinars and resources will be coming soon to help patients and care partners move toward improved empowerment, care, and support for their cancer journeys.

Self-Compassion Meditation

Self-Compassion Meditation from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Learn about cultivating love and tenderness towards yourself and bolstering feelings of self-worth, self-acceptance, and resilience. Support your overall psychological and emotional well-being.

See More from Rx for Community Wellness

Transcript:

Greetings everyone. Thank you for joining this Patient Empowerment Network program. In this practice session we will be focusing our attention on directing compassion towards ourselves. Compassion is having tenderness towards someone who is suffering along with a heartfelt desire to alleviate their suffering.

In this practice we will be targeting this compassion towards ourselves. Bring to mind a situation in your life that is difficult, a situation that is causing you stress. To your level of comfort allow yourself to feel the discomfort of the situation in your body. Now please don’t force this. Back off if it is too intense. You don’t want to force this. Saying silently to yourself as you feel into the discomfort: this is a moment of suffering, this is difficult, this is hard, this is painful. Whatever words you can use to acknowledge your distress. Acknowledging that in life there are difficult moments. That you are not alone. So, silently saying to yourself, acknowledging to yourself that suffering is a part of the human experience. We all go through struggles in our lives. Acknowledging your struggle, your discomfort as a human being having a human experience. If you like, you may place a tender hand over your heart. Asking yourself what kind words you need to soothe yourself in this moment of distress, of discomfort, of suffering. See if any of the following phrases work for you or find what works for you in your particular situation: May I give myself the compassion that I need, May I learn to accept myself as I am, May I forgive myself, May I be kind to myself, or May I be patient. Repeating your desired phrase or phrases to yourself with a tender heart.

Bringing this practice to a close. Noticing how you feel. So releasing the phrases. Noticing how you feel. Gently open your eyes. We hope you have enjoyed this Patient Empowerment Network program

Loving Kindness Meditation (Part II)

Loving Kindness Meditation (Part II) from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

 Learn about cultivating love and kindness towards others and enhancing your capacity for social connectedness. Watch now.

See More from Rx for Community Wellness

Transcript:

Greetings everyone. Thank you for joining this Patient Empowerment Network program. In this practice session we will be planting seeds of loving kindness towards others in the garden of our minds. To start our practice, find a comfortable seat. A chair is perfectly fine. And make any arrangements to support your back if necessary.

Allow your eyes to softly close, if you feel comfortable doing so. Begin to feel into the weight of your body being supported by your seat. Taking in a deep breath in through the nostrils and exhale softly out the mouth with pursed lips. Do this several times. Releasing control of the breath and allow yourself to feel into the natural rhythm of your breath. The natural uncontrolled breath. Relaxing with each breath. Bring to mind the feeling of love to the best of your ability. Without forcing it. You may bring up a memory to support you in this process. The important thing here is to feel into the quality of love itself. Again, without forcing it.

Allowing this feeling of love to permeate your mind and body, your entire being. With a loving heart bring to mind someone who is dear to you. With a kind and loving heart begin to silently repeat the following phrases towards them. Feeling into to each repetition of the phrases to best of your ability without forcing it. May you be safe from harm, May you be well in mind and body, May you be happy, May you live with ease, May you be filled with lovingkindness. Let’s circle back and extend this kind heartedness towards all beings.  May all beings be safe from harm, May all beings be well in mind and body, May all beings be happy, May all beings live with ease, May all beings be filled with lovingkindness. Releasing the phrases. Noticing how you feel. Gently open your eyes. We hope you have enjoyed this Patient Empowerment Network program

Loving Kindness Meditation (Part I)

Loving Kindness Meditation (Part I) from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Learn about cultivating love and kindness towards yourself and enhancing psychological and emotional well-being. Watch now.

See More from Rx for Community Wellness

Transcript:

Greetings everyone. Thank you for joining this Patient Empowerment Network program. In this practice session we will be planting seeds of loving kindness towards ourselves in the garden of our minds.

To start our practice, find a comfortable seat. A chair is perfectly fine. And make any arrangements to support your back if necessary. Allow your eyes to softly close, if you feel comfortable doing so. Begin to feel into the weight of your body being supported by your seat. Take a deep breath in through the nostrils and exhale out the mouth softly with pursed lips. And do this several times. Allow yourself to feel into the rhythm of your natural breath. The natural uncontrolled breath. Relaxing with each breath. Bring to mind the feeling of love to the best of your ability. Without forcing it. You may bring up a memory to support you in this.

The important thing here is to feel into the quality of love itself. Without forcing it. Allowing this feeling of love to permeate your mind and body, your entire being. With a loving heart begin to softly gaze inward, inwardly towards yourself. With a kind and loving heart begin to silently repeat the following phrases towards yourself. Feeling into to each repetition of the phrases to best of your ability without forcing it. May I be safe from harm, May I be well in mind and body, May I be happy, May I live with ease, May I be filled with lovingkindness. Let’s circle back through one more time. May I be safe from harm, May I be well in mind and body, May I be happy, May I live with ease, May I be filled with lovingkindness. Releasing the phrases. Noticing how you feel. Gently open your eyes. We hope you have enjoyed this Patient Empowerment Network program

Meditation on Peace

Meditation on Peace from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Learn about taking in the good by attending to the qualitative state of PEACE and making it a more available inner resource. Watch now.

See More from Rx for Community Wellness

Transcript:

Greetings everyone. Thank you for joining this Patient Empowerment Network program. In this practice session we will be focusing our attention on positive states of mind that support wellbeing.

The mind can be looked at like a garden. In this practice session we will be planting seeds in the garden of our minds by focusing our attention on positive states of mind. These mental states become inner resources that are more accessible to us in our daily experiences. So, for this particular practice session we will be planting the seeds of Peace.

To start our practice, find a comfortable seat. A chair is perfectly fine. And make any arrangements to support your back if necessary. Allow your eyes to softly close if you feel comfortable doing so. Feeling into the weight of your body being supported by your seat. Bring to mind an experience of Peace. Recalling any experience that brings to mind Peace. Something that has soothed your spirit. Feel into the Peace of the experience. So, you want to tap into the Peace, the feeling of Peace. And letting go of the story about the experience and focus on the feeling of Peace. Maintaining your attention on Peace to best of your ability. If the mind wonders about, gently come back to the feeling of Peace. Without fighting your mind gently come back to the feeling of Peace. Opening yourself to this Peace. Allowing it to fill your mind. Noticing this feeling of Peace. Feeling into it like it’s your first time. Taking it all in. Receiving the Peace. Giving yourself over to it. Allowing it to become a part of who you are. A part of your being. This Peace. This feeling of Peace. Notice what is pleasant about this experience of Peace. Feeling the presence of Peace. Unbounded Peace. Exhaling all your breath out and taking in a full inhalation and exhaling with a soft ah… Gently open your eyes.

We hope you enjoyed this Patient Empowerment Network program.

Meditation on Joy

Meditation on Joy from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Learn about taking in the good by attending to the qualitative state of JOY and making it a more available inner resource. Watch now.

See More from Rx for Community Wellness

Transcript:

Greetings everyone. Thank you for joining this Patient Empowerment Network program. In this practice session we will be focusing our attention on positive states of mind that support wellbeing. The mind can be looked at like a garden. In this practice we will be planting seeds in the garden of our minds by focusing our attention on positive states of mind. These mental states become inner resources that are more accessible to us in our daily experiences. So, for this particular practice session we will be planting the seeds of joy.

To start our practice, find a comfortable seat. A chair is perfectly fine. And make any arrangements to support your back if necessary. Allow your eyes to softly close if you feel comfortable doing so. Feeling into the weight of your body being supported by your seat. Bring the mind to an experience of Joy. Recalling any experience that brings to mind Joy. Something that has lifted your spirits. Feel into the joy of the experience. So you want to tap into the joy, the feeling of joy. Letting go of the story and focus on the feeling of joy. Maintaining your attention on joy. If the mind wonders about gently come back to feeling joy. Without fighting your mind gently come back to the feeling of joy. Opening yourself to this joy. Allowing it to fill your mind. Noticing this feeling of joy. Feeling into it like it’s your first time. Taking it all in. Receiving the joy. Giving yourself over to it. Allowing it to become a part of who you are. A part of your being. This joy. This feeling of joy. Notice what is pleasant about this experience of joy. Feeling the presence of joy. Unbounded joy. Exhaling your breath out and taking in a full inhale and exhaling with a soft ah… Gently open your eyes. We hope you enjoyed this Patient Empowerment Network program

Chest Breathing Meditation

Chest Breathing Meditation from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

 Learn about cultivating an alert quality of mind through controlled chest breathing

See More from Rx for Community Wellness

Transcript:

Greetings everyone. Thank you for joining this Patient Empowerment Network program. In this practice session we will be exploring active breathing as a form of meditative practice. Before we start the practice, I want to state that the quality of your breathing is intimately related to the qualitative experience of your mind.

In this session we will be taking advantage of this relationship between the mind and the breath by manipulating the breath in order to manipulate and regulate the mind. To start our practice, find a comfortable seat. A chair is perfectly fine. You may also make arrangements to support your back if necessary. Allow your eyes to softly close if you feel comfortable doing so. By closing the eyes, you minimize visual distractions. Begin to feel the weight of your body in your seat. Begin to lengthen your spine. Relaxing your shoulders. Lengthening the back of your neck. Relaxing your jaw, and the musculature of the face. Begin to take notice of the natural flow of your breath. Maybe by attending to your torso, the abdominal or chest areas, or the movement of the air as it passes through your nostrils. I invite you to imagine your torso as a cylindrical tube made of a lower chamber, the abdominal area, and an upper chamber, the chest area. In this practice we will focus on the upper chamber, the chest area. The lower chamber/abdominal area will remain steady and still throughout this practice.

If you like, you can rest a hand on your chest to help you with this exercise. Begin by actively exhaling the breath out the nostrils. Then begin to inhale smoothly and gradually through the nostrils, feeling the expansion of the upper chamber by allowing your lower ribs to fan out in all directions without straining, then your mid chest to upper chest and back without straining. When the upper chamber fills, gently and smoothly exhale out the nostrils allowing the chest area to descend. Continue this smooth and gradual controlled breathing in and out the nostrils as long as time permits. Allowing your next exhalation to be your final round and return to attending to the natural flow of your breath. Gently open your eyes. We hope you enjoyed this Patient Empowerment Network program.

Abdominal Breath Meditation

Abdominal Breath Meditation from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Learn how to cultivate a calm and soothing quality of mind through controlled abdominal breathing.

See More from Rx for Community Wellness

Transcript:

Greetings everyone. Thank you for joining this Patient Empowerment Network program. In this practice session we will be exploring active breathing as a form of meditative practice. Before we start the practice, I want to state that the quality of your breathing is intimately related to the qualitative experience of the mind. In this session we will be taking advantage of this relationship between the mind and the breath by manipulating the breath in order to manipulate and regulate the mind.

To start our practice, find a comfortable seat. A chair is perfectly fine. You may also make arrangements to support your back if necessary. Or you may lie down on your back for this particular practice. Allow your eyes to softly close if you feel comfortable doing so. By closing the eyes you minimize visual distractions. If you are seated feel the weight of your body in your seat. Begin to lengthen your spine. Relaxing your shoulders. Lengthening the back of your neck. Relaxing your jaw, and the musculature of the face. Begin to take notice of the natural flow of your breath. Maybe by attending to your torso, the abdominal or chest areas, or the movement of the air as it passes through your nostrils.

I invite you to imagine your torso as a cylindrical tube made of a lower chamber, the abdominal area, and an upper chamber, the chest area. In this practice we will focus on the lower chamber, the abdominal area. If you like, you can rest a hand on your abdomen to help you with this exercise. Begin by actively exhaling the breath out the nostrils, gently drawing your abdomen back towards your spine. Then begin to inhale smoothly and gradually through the nostrils feeling the expansion of the lower chamber in all directions without straining. While allowing the upper chamber/chest area to remain steady and still. When the lower chamber fills, gently and smoothly exhale out the nostrils bringing the abdomen towards the spine. Continue this smooth and gradual controlled breathing in and out the nostrils as long as time permits. Allowing your next exhale to be your final round and return to attending to the natural flow of your breath. Gently open your eyes.

We hope you enjoyed this Patient Empowerment Network program.

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Shirley’s Clinical Trial Profile

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Shirley’s Clinical Trial Profile from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patient Shirley felt she had a different experience not fitting the typical CLL patient demographic. Watch as she shares about her journey as a BIPOC patient, the value of clinical trials, and her advice to other patients for ensuring optimal outcomes.

See More from Patient-to-Patient Diverse CLL Clinical Trial Profiles

Related Programs:

Deirdre’s Clinical Trial Profile


Transcript:

Shirley:

In my late 30s, I started feeling extremely fatigued, and I went to my GYN. She ran a couple of tests, and she has sent me over to a hematologist because she just determined that it was something that she was not knowledgeable about. Then I had a physician contact me after several blood tests, and they had told me that it was a form of cancer, and it was leukemia, and it was called CLL, which is chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

When I heard the word chronic, I immediately thought, “Oh my God, this means like death instantly.” But they had told me that, “No, it was aggressive, but it’s definitely slow-moving,” and I have a great chance of fighting it. I was concerned because I did not feel like I wanted to be a lab rat, because I was told that I did not fit the demographics for having CLL. Most of the individuals were male of Caucasian descent, and they were much, much older than I was possibly in the late 60 to 70s, so I got a lot of stares and it made me feel very uncomfortable. So, I just didn’t want to feel like they were just like, “Okay, this is a different case. We can make a name for.” I wanted to make sure I was getting the best treatment.

I didn’t tell too many people in the beginning because I really didn’t know what was going on, but a lot of people was able to tell because no matter how much the time of sleep I got…I was always tired. The fatigue is just overwhelming. I decided to just remain optimistic about my future, because I know whenever you’re trying to battle any kind of ailment your attitude means a lot, you have to really put it out there into existence that you’re going to get better and you believe it, you have to really believe it in order to put that energy into finding out about the treatments and so forth. My doctors, they gave me a booklet that was maybe about it, and they said to me, “Take this home, study hematology and learn about your disease, how we’re going to be trying to treat it, and you know what you’re going to be feeling and you need to tell us everything if your nose itches, your eyes burn. We need to know everything that happens.”

And I was just not a complaining type of person, so there were plenty of times where I was experiencing like pain on my side and I was just like, “Oh, it’s probably just gas from the medication,” and then later found out that the medication they were giving me was enlarging my spleen, so it was pushing against my stomach, which was causing me an enormous amount of discomfort. So the doctors had to then give me other types of medication to help treat that issue that I was having, so it was definitely a long journey. This was an unusual diagnosis for someone of my heritage. The doctors explained to me that there was no blueprint for my treatment, this was, they were going to be trying things, they had a team of individuals, maybe it was like 10 or 15 of them, and they’re actually studying my case on this big screen in this room.

So it was constant medication, it was constant them trying, running the blood test, you were always, always getting blood tests, they were always giving you observations. Someone was always in your room, at least every two hours, checking to see what was going on. I just remember some time sitting in the hospital was just feeling very overwhelmed and definitely feeling isolated alone. I remember one time I was in so much pain, like my bones were hurting me so bad that I literally was just losing my mind in the bed. So they gave me some morphine, which I’ve never taken before in my life, and I wind up throwing up the chemo medication that they gave me. it was just so bad. So, the nurses and I were really overwhelmed at that point. I remember contacting family members and telling them, “I need to get out of here, I feel like they’re just trying whatever they want to try on me, and I don’t think it’s working. I don’t feel this is the place for me, like I need to really get out of here.”

So my doctor who was actually giving a seminar in Switzerland was just like…he was really amazing. He said to me, he said, “You are my prize patient. I am working every day really hard trying to get you back to being your 100 percent yourself,” He said, “You’re always like a light of sunshine.” The women that he worked with are always looking in the patient portal, and they’re like, “Shirley is coming in,” like, “Oh my gosh, she’s coming today.” And they’re excited because I always maintained a great attitude, and I always came in there dressed up.

So my doctor also recommended it when my treatment, a hospital stay was over for me to practice on taking out walks and exercising, yoga was very good meditation, they told me to get all these apps on my phone and therapeutic massages, those have been like a savior for me. I think having a good support system around you is extremely important, people who understand. Never be afraid to tell people what exactly you are experiencing. The mental fatigue that you go through is really unpredictable, and it’s off because that was not something that they, that no one prepared you for. So my doctor and his colleagues, they were just one of the greatest teams that I have experienced, them being very transparent about what was going on with me, even when I was at one time being very stubborn, I got so upset that I pulled the IV out of my arm and I was like, “You know what, I’m not doing this, I’m tired. I’ve got to get out of this hospital. I can’t stay here.”

I mean, people were just so sick, and this is not me. And they had to assure me, “It is you. You are sick, and you do have a blood cancer, and the sooner you come to terms with that, the more calm you’re going to be in being susceptible to accepting treatment. We’re here to help you, but we need you to tell us if something is not working, you don’t feel good on what’s going on in your body, we need to know.” The blood tests don’t lie, they tell them exactly what’s happening, the doctors know if the treatment is working, they monitor the CLL extremely closely. They were way more advanced at honing in on the type of treatment that I needed, so I was really assured that you’re in the right hands, and after when I started feeling a little bit better, then my trust totally opened up in staff, because I saw that they were excited about my treatment working. They were giving me the three combinations of chemo, and they were like, “This combination is working for you now.”

They started a new trial which was bringing in venetoclax (Venclexta) along with the rituximab (Rituxan), and that is what really started sending me on a better path, getting better. And then once I came off of the rituximab, which was an IV-infused chemo treatment, they decided to just keep me on the pill form of venetoclax, I was able to go into the office, which I was ecstatic about.

Advice I like to give to patients who are considering a clinical trial is definitely ask a lot of questions. Don’t be afraid, don’t be shy or hesitant and don’t feel like you feel like you’re ignorant. And always address it with a positive attitude. Keep in mind that they are there for your best interests and trying to get your health back to normalcy. Just know that you’re not in it alone. And always find someone that you can always have a conversation with if you don’t feel comfortable. Never be afraid to ask questions and just even if you do look different as opposed to everyone else that… and just get that everyone else that is sick. Don’t feel like you’re in it alone, regardless of how you look for what your demographic background is, just know that the team that’s there that’s in place is always fighting for you, and you can always say no or get a second opinion. That’s very important to know that you have options.

So, never feel afraid to ask about the clinical trials and do your research, it’s important. It’s inspiring to see people on the leukemia organization website that are exercising, they go for runs right after they receive treatment, that inspired me to say, I’m going to out and take the dog out for a walk or go out for a run and help myself get better,” and it works. It works, it really does.

PEN-Powered Guided Meditation

Register and join 15-minute expert guided mindfulness meditation practice sessions to:

  • Cultivate habits conducive to thriving health
  • Increase your clarity, wisdom and resilience
  • Maximize your family’s well-being

Register Now


This program is brought to you by our partner, Diverse Health Hub. 

PEN-Powered Guided Meditation

Register and join 15-minute expert guided mindfulness meditation practice sessions to:

  • Cultivate habits conducive to thriving health
  • Increase your clarity, wisdom and resilience
  • Maximize your family’s well-being

Register Now


This program is brought to you by our partner, Diverse Health Hub. 

PEN-Powered Guided Meditation

Register and join 15-minute expert guided mindfulness meditation practice sessions to:

  • Cultivate habits conducive to thriving health
  • Increase your clarity, wisdom and resilience
  • Maximize your family’s well-being

Register Now


This program is brought to you by our partner, Diverse Health Hub. 

PEN-Powered Guided Meditation

Register and join 15-minute expert guided mindfulness meditation practice sessions to:

  • Cultivate habits conducive to thriving health
  • Increase your clarity, wisdom and resilience
  • Maximize your family’s well-being

Register Now


This program is brought to you by our partner, Diverse Health Hub. 

PEN-Powered Guided Meditation

Register and join 15-minute expert guided mindfulness meditation practice sessions to:

  • Cultivate habits conducive to thriving health
  • Increase your clarity, wisdom and resilience
  • Maximize your family’s well-being

Register Now


This program is brought to you by our partner, Diverse Health Hub. 

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