Tag Archive for: myeloma diagnosis

Multiple Myeloma: Danielle’s Clinical Trial Profile

Multiple Myeloma: Danielle’s Clinical Trial Profile from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Multiple myeloma patient Danielle was a very active person – and even went on vacation – right before receiving her diagnosis. Her myeloma journey unfolded with her myeloma symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and participation in a life-altering clinical trial. “I decided to do the study trial because I also wanted to help individuals. If it wasn’t going to help me, then my data that they collect from the study trial will definitely help the scientists, researchers, the doctors. It would help them try to find a cure.” 

See More from Patient-to-Patient Diverse Myeloma Clinical Trial Profiles

Transcript:

Danielle:

Hello, everyone. My name is Danielle.

My myeloma story began in 2011. I was experiencing pain in my hip and my back area, and it was the pain that would come and go.  I was also very lethargic in 2011 and couldn’t understand why I was so extremely tired, so I thought the pain in my hip and back area was due to sciatic nerve, and I just didn’t do anything about it, ignored the pain. My husband and I went on our first trip without our sons in October of 2011, and two days before the trip, I developed this really bad nasty pain in my hip and leg area, which actually altered my walk, but I had no idea what the heck was going on, and so I was so frustrated that I… As soon as we got home, I went to see an orthopedic doctor because at that time I was working out like five times a week, so I thought maybe I pulled something, a pinched nerve or something. So I went to see him, he took X-rays, I believe it was an MRI, couldn’t be sure, but when I went back to get my test results, he sat me down and said, “Mrs. Spann, there’s a mass here in your fibula, and I’m going to recommend you to an orthopedic oncologist.” So, that was the very beginning of my diagnosis, initial diagnosis. Of course, I was in denial because I’m like, I knew what an oncologist was, but he must not be talking to the right person, but I went ahead and I met with the orthopedic oncologist. He ran a bunch of tests and mentioned to me that I had myeloma, which is concentrated in one area, which was my fibula, and then he recommended that I have my fibula removed on my right leg. Two days before surgery was scheduled, I received a phone call from his office, saying, “Mrs. Stann, you have lytic lesions all throughout your skeletal structure, and we’re recommending that you go see a bone marrow transplant oncologist.” So now it’s becoming real. The diagnosis is what it was, and I just wanted to know how I could basically fight this. I’m the type of person where you tell me one thing and let’s try to find a solution, so I met with the bone marrow transplant specialist, the oncologist, and then we formulated a plan, and that plan was for me to go on my first study trial. And so that was my introduction into my having multiple myeloma.

I made the decision to participate in a trial, because I trusted my doctor. He had the expertise to understand where my myeloma was, the counts, how aggressive it was, and he recommended that I go on the study trial. He also told me that if the study trial was not going to work for me, or if it wasn’t helping me, that he was going to take me off the study trial. So, I was on the study trial from like January to March…to the end of March, and he sat me down and said that it was not working, my numbers weren’t really moving, and that he was taking me off the study trial. And he took me off the study trial, there were some other treatments that were involved, and then I had two stem cell transplants. After the transplant in 2012, I went ahead and started another treatment regimen, and I was on that for several years, which worked well. My numbers were coming down, but then unfortunately they started going back up, so he mentioned that I should go on another study trial.  I weighed the odds, and I knew that he would not lead me down the wrong path. So, I went ahead and I participated in the study trial that I’m still on today, and I’ve been on it for about three, four years.

I decided to do the study trial because I also wanted to help individuals. If it wasn’t going to help me, then my data that they collect from the study trial will definitely help the scientists, researchers, the doctors. It would help them try to find a cure. And so that’s what I wanted to help in some form or fashion, and when I first was diagnosed going to the Winship Cancer Center twice a week, there was a quote that was posted in the cancer center, and that quote was by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the quote read, “Life’s most important and persistent question is, ‘What have we done to help others?’” And I would go into the center and I’m like, “Yeah, what have I done to help others?” And me participating in the study trial, I felt like I’m helping others indirectly, and it wasn’t always just about myself, it was, “Okay, yes, the study trial gives the data, and it’s helping me, but it’s also helping that next person as well.”

So, I always look at my life as before diagnosis and after, and my after does not look like my before, I can’t do the same things, I can’t do the same things that I used to do. And one of those things is going to the mall and being in there like 10 hours, that’s so remedial, but it just goes to show like I cannot exert myself the same type of energy that I could before diagnosis. And again, that’s my new normal.  I stay positive with everything in life, things happen, but you just have to do what you can to make it better, no matter what it is.

I am happy and proud and so grateful and thankful to mention that as of January 2021, my myeloma is 0% detectable, which means there’s no presence of multiple myeloma in my blood, in my urine, nor in my bone marrow. And so I’m still on a study trial, and I have two different chemo meds that I have to take, and I just act accordingly if I know that one of the chemo meds that I have to take twice a week gives me an upset stomach. I just accordingly in finding different ways to push through it. It is what it is, and my motto when I was having my bone marrow transplants was, “This too shall pass.” And so no matter what I’m going through in life, no matter how down I get. This moment will pass. And so tomorrow, you’ll look back on today and say, “You know what, I did it, I made it.” And you’ll do that for the next day, until you realize that you’re just constantly defeating that previous day, and you’re moving forward.

So, I’ve heard the terminology of a clinical trial, never really paid attention to it because I never had to…I had an idea what the clinical trial was. But once it really came home to me, I realized that, in my words, the clinical trial is collecting the data necessary, they’re going to give you the trial medication, because they’re looking to get this, this medicine approved to put on the market. These medications would not get approved by the FDA, acetaminophen (Tylenol) at one point had to go have a study trial and then get approved by the FDA and then can be distributed to the masses. And so it’s the same with these other drugs. We need individuals to participate positively, knowing that if this is not helping me right now, it will help someone in five years, in two years, in 20 years. The advice that I would give is to trust your doctor, your doctor would not recommend a study trial if he felt that there was a medication that’s already on the market that would help you better. If the study trial you’re on is keeping you with your family, and at the same time is…the scientist, the researchers they’re gathering all this data, it could come to be an actual medication in three, five, seven years. And so just think of it as something that you’re helping society…and your fellow…and your fellow man.  

How Can We Address Noted Disparities in Multiple Myeloma?

How Can We Address Noted Disparities in Multiple Myeloma? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo

What can patients and healthcare providers do to improve health disparities for myeloma patients? Expert Dr. Joseph Mikhael explains the communities that need more outreach about myeloma and those he views as vital to educating about myeloma risk and symptoms for earlier diagnosis and better health outcomes.

See More From the Myeloma TelemEDucation Empowerment Resource Center

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How Can Myeloma Patients Take Disease Ownership and Connect With Resources?

How Can Myeloma Patients Take Disease Ownership and Connect With Resources?

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Will Telemedicine Be a Mainstay for Myeloma Patients After the Pandemic?

Will Telemedicine Be a Mainstay for Myeloma Patients After the Pandemic?

 

Transcript:

Dr. Joseph Mikhael:

Well, I have to tell you, this is a very personal issue for me, disparities in multiple myeloma, and I have the privilege of being involved in many programs and platforms to try and address this. And like with any major consideration, there isn’t a simple solution, it is going to take a multi-fold solution that has many parts. The first part that I think is critical is engagement of our communities, whether it is the Black community, the Hispanic community, even though in more rural areas or patients uninsured, we really require a kind of an engagement that’s real to build trust, to build confidence, this is stemmed from years of mistrust and understandably, so that we have to re-build.

I try to do that personally in my practice, but advocate for it on a larger sphere. Secondly, I want to empower my patients to learn and for communities to learn, whether someone has myeloma might have my load or as already myeloma, and I don’t have it might have it, or do you have it? Those patients need to be educated about myeloma so that they can understand who’s at risk and facilitate a more early and a more accurate diagnosis. Thirdly, I believe very much so, in educating the primary care world, the majority of patients with myeloma are still diagnosed by a primary care physician. They may ultimately see a hematologist-oncologist to confirm that, but the suspicion comes at the primary care level. And so I’m involved in multiple programs to educate primary care docs to think about myeloma, as I like to say, “If you don’t take a temperature, a patient won’t have a fever, you need to look for it.” And so if there are certain signs or symptoms that may include bone pain, significant fatigue, signs that we see like protein in the urine or a low hemoglobin or kidney dysfunction, these things need to push us to look for multiple myeloma. And then lastly, to look at disparity as an important area of work across the whole board that we need to better access to have better access for clinical trials and for the therapies that we know will benefit our patients, and that’s on us as physicians. But it’s also on the community at large, our regulators, our insurance companies.

Those are the kinds of things that I’m working on so that we can make a long-standing difference and really start to reduce this currently awful disparity in multiple myeloma.

 

Why Is Multiple Myeloma Diagnosed Much Later in BIPOC Patients?

Why is Multiple Myeloma Diagnosed Much Later in BIPOC Patients? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo

How do multiple myeloma diagnosis and treatment differ in BIPOC communities? Expert Dr. Joseph Mikhael details some statistics on BIPOC myeloma patients, factors that can impact myeloma survival rates, and myeloma clinical trial participation rates of African Americans.

See More From the Myeloma TelemEDucation Empowerment Resource Center

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Is MGUS More Prevalent in BIPOC Communities?

Is MGUS More Prevalent in BIPOC Communities?

 

Will Telemedicine Mitigate Financial Toxicity for Myeloma Patients?

Will Telemedicine Mitigate Financial Toxicity for Myeloma Patients?

How Can We Address Noted Disparities in Multiple Myeloma?

How Can We Address Noted Disparities in Multiple Myeloma?

 

Transcript:

Dr. Joseph Mikhael:

We know that multiple myeloma is a unique disease in the African American, in the Black community, really for many reasons, primarily the disease is twice as common in Blacks than it is in Caucasians, we don’t fully understand all of the rationale and the understanding of that, the science behind that, but we know it’s just twice as prevalent.  What’s perhaps most disturbing is that despite knowing that it is twice as common, it is often not recognized and not recognized in time. The average time to diagnosis from the onset of symptoms to an accurate diagnosis is significantly longer in the African American community than it would be in the Caucasian community, and that’s an unfortunate reality. And that along with the treatment that individuals have access to, we’ve learned, unfortunately, that African Americans are less likely to receive triplet therapies or the combinations of chemotherapy that are so important, transplant that we know is stem cell transplants are very important in the treatment of myeloma, and access to clinical trials. African Americans constitute somewhere between 17 percent to 20 percent of all myeloma patients in this country, but actually, only reflect about 5 percent to 6 percent of clinical trial participation, and all of that has led unfortunately to an inferior survival rate in African Americans compared to Caucasians.

We’ve seen huge advances in survival in myeloma over the last decade, but for every 1.3 years gained by Caucasian patients, we’ve only seen 0.8 years gained in Black patients, so this is a disparity that is disturbing and that we need to address.

The disparity in multiple myeloma is honestly, not only confined to the African American community, we see this in many other vulnerable communities, in particular, the Hispanic community, where we know that the disease is diagnosed at a younger age than we would typically see in the Caucasian community. Also reflective of the healthcare system in our country where many patients of the Hispanic background have less access to healthcare, and this clearly influences outcomes, and so as we study this more and appreciate it more, we come to understand that there are many vulnerable populations by virtue of race, by virtue of insurance status, by virtue of a documented status, all of these things, unfortunately, have a significant impact in a patient’s survival with multiple myeloma. COVID-19 has really affected so many things in the medical community. But thankfully, one of the things that we have not significantly seen, apart from for a period of time, reduced access to clinical trials, we have been able to maintain the supply of our key agents and treatments that we use in multiple myeloma. So I’m very thankful that I have not had to delay or cancel my patients’ treatments by virtue of a supply chain issue, we’re very grateful that that supply chain has pretty well been maintained after out the pandemic, and we trust will continue to be maintained.

Is MGUS More Prevalent in BIPOC Communities?

Is MGUS More Prevalent in BIPOC Communities? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo

Does the multiple myeloma precursor of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) occur more frequently in minority (BIPOC) patients? Expert Dr. Sarah Holstein from the University of Nebraska Medical Center shares information that myeloma studies are researching on Black, Indigenous, and People of Color patients and how to improve myeloma awareness and care.

See More From the Myeloma TelemEDucation Empowerment Resource Center

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Will Telemedicine Be a Mainstay for Myeloma Patients After the Pandemic?

Will Telemedicine Be a Mainstay for Myeloma Patients After the Pandemic?

Will Telemedicine Mitigate Financial Toxicity for Myeloma Patients?

Will Telemedicine Mitigate Financial Toxicity for Myeloma Patients?

What Are the Benefits of Telemedicine for Myeloma Patients?

 

Transcript:

Dr. Sarah Holstein:

:  When we look at data sources like the SEER (The Surveillance Epidemiology, and End Results) data source, it’s not necessarily so granular that we can always distinguish whether the population is Black/Hispanic, Black/non-Hispanic, but really where I’ve seen the increased risk is whenever there are population-based studies and they describe the population at least in the U.S. as Black. I will admit I don’t know the details as to further sub-division amongst the category of Black and whether or not it’s appropriate to use the term BIPOC in this setting with respect to why do Black Americans have higher risk of plasma cell disorders than white Americans? I think that’s still a question that we can’t completely answer. There are a lot of really good research teams in this country and really worldwide that are trying to understand the different genetic-based risks, and it’s clear based on some studies that there’s some differential with respect to for example, what the frequency is of particular genetic abnormalities that happen in the plasma cells as they go from normal to abnormal. So, one example that I’ve seen is a higher frequency of translocation 11;14 in patients who are Black compared to patients who are white, but ultimately, I don’t think there’s an easy, easily understood answer to that very complex question right now with respect to why the risk is two to three-fold higher in Black individuals compared to white individuals. 

And then that’s a little bit of a separate—I mean it’s related, but in some ways, and that’s somewhat separate from the issue of when Black individuals actually get diagnosed with myeloma, whether that’s at a more advanced state of the disease than in white people that I think is a little bit more dependent on access to care as well, as knowledge of the disease. I would say that in general, myeloma is not a cancer that most Americans are actually that familiar with, and that’s regardless of white, Black, race or ethnicity, it’s still a relatively rare cancer and most people have never heard of it and don’t know other people who’ve had it. But I think what is key in the Black community is to really increase awareness of not only myeloma, but the precursor condition MGUS just like there have been enormous efforts to increase awareness of the risks of high blood pressure and diabetes, and how that can affect health later on, there’s also… I think sometimes a decreased frequency of access to primary care, sometimes myeloma is picked up just because of routine blood work, and that can be done sometimes on an annual basis by a primary care provider. And if individuals aren’t getting their annual physical and annual labs drawn, then by the time myeloma presents itself, sometimes it’s at the point where it’s presenting, because bad things have happened, like bones are breaking, or patients are very anemic, or there are serious infections, etcetera, as opposed to being found in a more asymptomatic stage when abnormalities such as high protein levels in the blood are noted that patients are otherwise feeling well. So I think you raise some really excellent questions, and I think there’s a lot of room for improvement in this country for not only improving the research so that we understand what the genetic bases are for developing plasma cell disorders, but also increasing education throughout this country, but specifically in the Black population, and then making sure that everybody has access to care.