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Tips For A Smooth Recovery From Oral Surgery

An estimated 51,500 adults in the United States get diagnosed with oral and oropharyngeal cancers each year. Many of these people require oral surgery as part of their treatment. Oral surgery itself can present problems, such as damaging teeth and gums, causing pain and swelling. Dealing with these before and after surgery can help to speed up your recovery time and improve your comfort throughout, getting you back to life as soon as possible.

Caring for your teeth

Many cancer patients lose their appetite during treatment or struggle to eat after oral surgery. They are encouraged to have high calorie drinks for nutrients, but these often contain a lot of sugar and can be very damaging to teeth.Oral surgery for cancer can be done after doses of chemotherapy or radiation, which can weaken teeth and gums. If you have any teeth that are damaged or vulnerable you should consider having these extracted before surgery as bone necrosis can occur afterwards, particularly if you’ve had oral radiotherapy. Once you’ve recovered, lost and damaged teeth can be replaced with dentures or dental implants to give a natural look and feel, helping you to live a normal life again.

What you can eat after oral surgery

Your surgeon will offer you advice specific to you, but there are some basic guidelines you should follow. Once any bleeding stops and for the first two days post-op you can eat soft foods and liquids, such as yogurt, soups and smoothies. Include foods that are rich in vitamins A and C as these help to speed up recovery from surgery. A study from the National Institutes of Health gave patients 500-3,000 mg of vitamin C, which is 8-50 times higher than the RDA. All patients were recovering from various types of surgeries, including oral surgeries. They found that the high doses promoted new collagen synthesis, which helped wounds to heal faster. Research from the University of Michigan also found that high doses of vitamin C before surgery reduced the risk of excessive bleeding, so upping your intake before and after can be beneficial.

Dealing with pain and swelling

Unfortunately, after almost any oral surgery you will experience some pain, swelling and possible bruising. Many surgeons will advise you to regularly put ice on the area to reduce swelling, however recent research indicates that ice can stop the immune system’s natural response and actually delay healing. Ice can be a natural pain relief though, so if you choose to use it, apply it for 5 minutes at a time with 20 minute breaks in between as this is less likely to stop the body’s natural response. You’ll probably receive pain medication too, make sure you take this as instructed, even before pain occurs as it can prevent it.

Recovering from oral surgery can be painful, but it can also be a step in the right direction for your recovery, helping you to lead a normal and happy life. Pain and swelling are to be expected, and consuming soft foods and plenty of nutrients and minerals can help with this.

Moods of Oral Cancer…A Patient’s Journey

Real patient experiences shared privately at www.TreatmentDiaries.com.  Read more, share if you like or join in the conversation.  Making sure you feel less alone navigating a diagnosis is important.  Connecting you to those who can relate and provide support is what we do.

 

I’ve been even deeper in dissociation than usual lately. Normally, I have a habit of walking through life with a general sense of disconnection, forgetting most events, even some important ones. But lately–within the past few days I think–things have been a bit worse. I’m often feeling dizzy, having trouble translating talking into words, hearing everyday noises “echoing,” having a hard time making myself communicate with proper human body language and tone of voice, etc. I also feel even more dreamlike and can’t get my eyes to focus on anything for long. Pretty sure my depression linked to a life of living with oral cancer has something to do with it all, especially because I often feel like I lack the energy to act normally.

I think I remember feeling angry and invisible earlier today, but I can’t remember exactly why. I’m not sure if I want to remember. I can’t stand the idea of having to be reminded of recent events I should remember, but I don’t know if I could handle knowing them. It just might be too much.

I got the usual restlessness and anxiety when I got home today. It felt like I needed something to happen–and fast–though I couldn’t work up the courage to talk to my “friends.” And I don’t know why I have to put “friends” in parentheses. These people haven’t done anything wrong, and I’ve known them for years. I think I’m just so scared to get close to them and become my idea of their friend. I want to be able to run away when I start to care about what they think too much, and that’s not what people usually consider as friendship. “Friend” means commitment. “Friend” means deep caring and consideration. Those are things I can’t really handle right now, especially because of how often I slip up and how devastated I get when I do feel like I slip up. Those two things don’t mix well.

I guess I also don’t think they consider me as a “friend.” And my brain seems to think that being the only one in a relationship that considers the other person as a friend is annoying. I already feel so annoying and I blame my cancer diagnosis most for the loss of friends in my life.

I probably just overthink the meaning of friendship. After all, I’ve been told that several times. Even so, I’m still scared of intimacy and commitment and what people think, so the idea of friendship feels really overwhelming. I’m already overwhelmed enough.

Anyway, since I felt the need for something exciting/different to happen, I ended up playing a game with those people. The idea was scary, though, but I couldn’t think of another option, so I ended up taking Xanax before doing so. I think it helped a little, though the only person I had the courage to call was my partner (basically my safe person). I ended up feeling doomed about something that happened that night, though I can’t really remember what it was. Of course, the emotions I felt were expressed as anger at and avoidance of my partner, meaning he had to put up with even more drama. (He has to deal with this at least once a day…) Eventually, thanks to his help, I calmed down some. Really wish he didn’t have to be the one dealing with this every time, though.

Later that night, I think we messed around, and I was able to relax. I even felt like I was snapping out of that disassociation feeling a little – I truly don’t want to associate myself or my life with cancer, but I do. I want to be able to laugh and joke around at the end, but I’m slowly “disconnecting “more and more as time goes by, though. Xanax seems to do that sometimes. I’ll calm down some, but then I remember I have cancer and my life is not the same.  I’m pretty sure I got really emotional over at least one small thing today, though I can’t remember what it was. Cancer sucks – especially my cancer.