Tag Archive for: patient advocate

Managing Medical Mistrust: Creating a Healthy, Trust-Based System

If there’s anything “positive” that has come out of the pandemic, it’s that it has brought to light the many disparities that are still prevalent in healthcare. These have translated into disparities in the Covid world based on where people live, their education level and income, and their race, among others.

The same can be said about oncology specifically. Health disparities in the diagnosis and management of cancer can be described as being “higher cancer death rates, less frequent use of proven screening tests, and higher rates of advanced cancer diagnoses.” This was (and still is in some areas) exacerbated by the pandemic, where patients either opted to delay treatment or were told they couldn’t undergo treatment because of the surge of Covid patients in clinics and hospitals. Additionally, there have been delays in patients undergoing screenings for cancers, including colon, cervical, and breast cancers, especially among those of racial and ethnic groups, who already had a decreasing level of access to healthcare services at the beginning of the pandemic.

Undoubtedly, this has increased the level of mistrust in the healthcare system. How are patients supposed to get the care they need? How do providers increase their level of trust with their patients who are already at a disadvantage and have a greater risk of becoming infected with Covid or any other disease? Below are ways the healthcare system can bring patients and providers together to create a healthy, trust-based system:

Providers should:

  • Establish empathy and understanding of patients’ needs and values (and reiterate them back to the patient)
  • Offer different treatment options, if available. Be willing to discuss the pros and cons of each option, including recommendations
  • Discuss clinical trials as a treatment option, if applicable. Yes, healthcare is a business, but instead of a provider seeing it as “giving up” a patient, understanding that the patient’s health and well-being comes first is much more important
  • Work with the patient’s insurance, if necessary, for prior-authorizations on medications and procedures
  • Be honest with your patients. Gauge and/or ask about the amount of information they can handle when providing a diagnosis
  • Tell a patient if they don’t know something and/or if errors have been made. Being vulnerable and transparent in this regard demonstrates that you’re human

Patients should:

  • Be respectful of the physician’s (and other patients’) time during each appointment by bringing in a list of questions that need to be answered
  • Utilize patient portals!
  • Ask questions if unsure of anything spoken about during an appointment, especially medications
  • Be your own advocate when discussing your health (i.e. bring up why certain solutions are important to you)
  • Understand there are multiple patients being taken care of and no one patient’s needs are more or less important than another

What Is One Thing (Or More) You’d Like To Say To A Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Patient?

As we enter the final days of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, I am remembering a time over a decade ago, when immersed in a sea of pink ribbons I felt part of something. I had been diagnosed with breast cancer as the month of September turned into October and surrounded by Breast Cancer Awareness Month activities I felt supported as a newly diagnosed patient.

But as the last days of October faded and the pink ribbon wearers began to disappear, I was left wearing the everyday reality of a disease that I still felt ill-equipped to bear. I still feel a sense of sadness today at all that I had yet to learn and go through on my journey with breast cancer.  I often wonder how much easier that path might have been had I known then what I know now.

One thing I know for sure is that those of us who have traveled this road can ease the way for others who are just starting out. In this spirit, I reached out to the breast cancer community to ask them what advice they would give to a newly diagnosed person with breast cancer.  You will find their responses below alongside some of my own.

Find Support

Cancer research advocate and 20+ year breast cancer survivor, Lisa DeFerrari [1] emphasizes the important role of support. “Don’t be afraid to reach out for support early on,” she advises. “I realize that many of us are very independent-minded – I certainly am,” she says, “but breast cancer and learning how to deal with it are complicated and there are lots of great resources out there. Reaching out for information and support can also be a way to recover from the sense of loss of control that often comes with a cancer diagnosis.”

To this cancer blogger, Megan-Claire Chase [2] adds, “let go of your pride. Don’t be afraid to start a GoFundMe. You’d be amazed by people’s generosity to pay your medical bills and regular bills.”

Ask Questions

“Ask questions and push for information,” recommends Julia [3] creator of #BCCWW breast cancer Twitter chat. “For people living with long term conditions and disabilities before breast cancer it is valid to worry about the consequences of cancer and the risks of treatment on your wider health,” she adds.  “Don’t let anyone invalidate those concerns with ‘but cancer’  – it’s your body and health,  it’s you that has to bear the possible risks and potential consequences of both.   So make sure they’re centered to the degree you need them to be.”

Diagnosed with late-stage invasive lobular breast cancer in 2015, Siobhan Freeney [4] who campaigns for essential breast screening and early detection of breast cancer for women with dense breasts, urges women to ask about their breast density even after a diagnosis, as this is important information because It will influence their surveillance imaging. Siobhan highlights the fact that “many women diagnosed with breast cancer don’t know anything about dense breasts and associated risk factors.

Be Your Own Advocate

Although you may be reeling from the news of a cancer diagnosis, it’s important that you learn as much as you can about your diagnosis and what treatment options are available.  Siobhan advises taking time to absorb what’s just happened and then take notes at meetings and consultations. “Find out as much as you can about your particular cancer and speak up,” she recommends. “Ask for MRI, PET, CT any baseline scans available to you. Find reliable, evidence-based information.”

Jo Taylor [5] founder of After Breast Cancer Diagnosis stresses the need to be your own advocate. “Be your own advocate – try to understand what type of breast cancer it is and ask questions and research it. Always ask for copies of scans and details. Then find your community who support you and you can support them.”

Employment Advice

Megan-Claire offers this advice for those who are working full time at the time of diagnosis “Talk with your manager or direct supervisor and work out a plan where you can work from home (if not already due to COVID) and work out a schedule for coverage when your chemo treatment starts.” She also offers two practical tips when undergoing chemotherapy: “I suggest getting your chemo on Fridays so you’ll have the weekend to rest,” and “ask your oncologist for a temporary handicap sign. It helped me immensely due to deep fatigue.”

Tackle Fatigue

As Megan-Claire mentions, fatigue is an issue that cancer patients face. We all know what it’s like to feel tired — physically, mentally, and emotionally, but usually, after some relaxation and a good night’s sleep, we are ready to take on the world again. When you have cancer, though, rest often isn’t enough. You experience persistent, whole-body exhaustion. Even after adequate sleep or rest, you will still feel tired and unable to do the normal, everyday activities you did before with ease. A lot of cancer patients don’t report fatigue to their doctors because they think that nothing can be done about it. In fact, there are things that can be done to alleviate the debilitating effects of cancer-related fatigue. If left untreated, fatigue may lead to depression and profoundly diminish your quality of life, so it’s important that you speak to your doctor if fatigue is an issue for you [6].

Journal Your Thoughts

It is amazing how quickly you forget what you thought and felt in those early days of diagnosis and treatment. Megan-Claire recommends keeping a journal to note down your thoughts. “It could just be a sentence or two and either save them on your laptop or in a journal,” she recommends. “There was a lot I forgot about and was glad I had my little notes from the start of treatment to look back on.”

Honor Your Grief

One of the things you might like to journal about is the feelings of loss and grief you will experience with a cancer diagnosis. While many people think of grief only as a reaction to bereavement, we can feel grief after any kind of loss. Some of our losses are tangible, for example losing our hair, and some are more intangible, such as the loss of trust in our bodies. Coping with the losses associated with cancer is challenging. Grief brings many emotions with it. Patients, as well as caregivers and family members, may go through emotions of anger, denial, and sadness [7].

Respect the diagnosis; question the prognosis

This final piece of advice comes from Betsy Mullen [8]. “Respect the diagnosis; question the prognosis,” she says. “I was diagnosed with a grade III triple-negative breast cancer and given 2-3 years to live at best. That was 29 years ago.”

To Wrap Up

Being diagnosed with cancer is a life-changing event. Know that you will go through many emotions and experiences on the roller-coaster ride of diagnosis, treatment and beyond.  Each person will experience the journey in their own way.  While there’s no right or way to go through the experience, it’s important as mentioned above that you find support. Reach out at each step of the way and find someone who understands what you are going through and can offer you the support you need.


Notes

[1] Lisa DeFerrari Finding Great Support After a Cancer Diagnosis

[2] Megan-Claire Chase Life On The Cancer Train

[3] BCCWW https://twitter.com/bccww

[4] Siobhan Freeney https://beingdense.com

[5] Jo Taylor abcdiagnosis.co.uk

[6] How To Cope With Cancer-Related Fatigue

[7] Grief, Loss, and the Cancer Experience

[8] Betsy Mullen https://twitter.com/betsymullen

Involving Patients in their Care: The Clinical Trial and Drug Development Processes

Patient involvement in every facet of healthcare is incredibly important in creating better patient outcomes. I believe this is especially true in the rare and chronic disease communities, including cancer. One facet that is particularly key for patient engagement is the development of drugs produced through the clinical trial process.

Clinical trials can cost millions to fund with the goal of producing a product(s) that may or may not help it’s targeted disease population. Thousands of patients rely on these trials to find a cure and/or enhance their quality of life by providing symptoms of relief. Yet many don’t know about them, and if they do, it’s a struggle to find them, much less enroll in one.

As a person who takes on many roles, including a rare disease patient and a cancer patient, as well as someone who has translated clinical trial protocols for a lay audience and now recruits for those trials, I have seen firsthand the barriers that patients face when it comes to potentially life-saving treatments. Below is what I have encountered and what we as healthcare professionals can do about it:

Visibility Into Clinical Trials

While most patients know of and about clinical trials, they are often not aware that they may be an option for treatment. Healthcare is a business, and because of this, doctors feel like they’re “losing” their patients (aka revenue) when they refer their patients. However, most healthcare organizations, facilities, etc. boast that they’re focused on patient-centered care. Patient-centered care means focusing on the needs of each patient and providing the best treatment possible even if it comes from another source.

The Language of Clinical Trials

Clinical trials are often discussed using medical jargon that is too confusing for patients to understand, especially the eligibility criteria. Patients should not be expected to learn a new language to understand the treatment process. Rather, they need resources that will help them understand if they qualify, what will happen in the trial, and how long they’ll be in the trial for.

Outcomes of Clinical Trials

A patient who had participated in a clinical trial once told me that the investigators focused mainly on whether the drug that she was receiving was treating her condition and never considered her quality of life. Quality of life should automatically be included as a measurable outcome in each clinical trial even if it’s not the main purpose.

Involvement in Clinical Trials and Drug Development

Patient centricity, as written above, has become a buzzword in the healthcare industry. The drug company, AstraZeneca, defines it best: “Putting the patient first in an open and sustained engagement of the patient to respectfully and compassionately achieve the best outcome for that patient and their family.” Are we really doing this if patients aren’t involved in the drug and clinical trial development processes?

How can patients invest themselves, and the government and pharma invest in patients, to potentially get a better ROI?:

  • Look at Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute’s website, whose work focuses on outcomes most important to patients and research that focuses on gold-standard randomized controlled trials, as well as observational studies.
  • Sign up for AstraZeneca’s Patient Partnership Program
  • Research articles on drug development for your disease and contact the authors
  • Engage in the FDA’s Patient Representative Program
  • Join the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDHR)’s Patient Engagement Advisory Committee
  • Join the FDA’s Patient Engagement Collaborative
  • Participate and/or request a Patient Listening Session
  • Present at an Open Public Hearing Portion of an FDA Advisory Committee Meeting
  • Get involved in:
    • The FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER)’s Patient-Focused Drug Development program by subscribing to their email updates
    • A patient advocacy group and/or think tank
    • An organization related to your diagnosis that may have doctors on their Board that you can reach out to and share your story and the importance of involving patients

Find more information in this PDF created by Global Genes

Ten Things You Should Never Say To A Person With Cancer…And One Thing You Should

I get it. People so often just don’t know what to say to someone with cancer.

It’s a shock when someone you care about has received a life-changing diagnosis. Our natural instinct at times of trouble is to rush in with well-meaning phrases and encouraging thoughts.

It may feel to the person saying these things that they are being supportive, but it’s all too easy to say the wrong thing.

So what should you avoid saying to a cancer patient? The following list includes some of the most common things that we in the cancer community have heard from well-wishers. At the end of the list I share the one thing I would have most liked to have heard instead.

1. You’ll beat this

Probably the top-most thing that people say when they want to be supportive is that you’re strong and will beat cancer. While we all hope for the best outcome, we cannot actually be sure of the outcome of the disease for anyone. As breast cancer blogger Nancy Stordahl writes in What Does Beating Cancer Mean Anyway? [1] ”Struggling to live up to some gold standard of what beating cancer means, adds to the already exhausting burden. We need to stop patronizing and judging cancer patients based on misguided battle talk analogies. Cancer isn’t an opponent in some war game you can stomp out by mindset or determination.”

2. You’re so brave

An extension of “you’ll beat this.” This can come across as quite patronizing – especially when it’s followed by a statement like “I couldn’t do it.” The truth is we don’t feel particularly brave, we just don’t have a choice. We do what we have to do to get through treatment the best we can. By promoting belief in bravery and stoicism in the face of cancer, society creates unfair expectations of cancer patients and deprives us of an outlet for our darker fears.

3. My aunt had the same cancer and she was cured

While I’m happy your aunt recovered from cancer, no two cancers are alike. Cancer is a complicated disease and chances are her cancer is not the same as mine. An alternative version of this statement concerns an aunt who died from the “same cancer”. Please don’t go there with us.

4. What’s your prognosis? What are your odds of surviving?

Never, ever ask anyone this question. It is highly personal, intrusive, and insensitive. Enough said.

5. Have you tried [insert latest miracle supplement or diet]. I hear it can cure cancer.

There’s no shortage of advice urging cancer patients to eat a particular food, juice religiously, or try a miracle supplement, however, there’s no scientific evidence that these work and many are downright harmful.

6. The stress of [your divorce, bereavement, job loss] probably caused your cancer.

This is a variation of the “you’re to blame” for getting cancer brigade. “Did you smoke?” asked of lung cancer patients. “Did you breastfeed?” directed at breast cancer patients. All said with the implication that you should/shouldn’t have done a certain thing and really it’s your own fault for getting cancer. In fact, using a statistical model that measures the proportion of cancer risk, across many tissue types, scientists from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center published a study in 2015 which concluded that two-thirds of the variation in adult cancer risk across tissues can be explained primarily by “bad luck.” In other words, a major contributing factor to cancer is in fact beyond anyone’s control.

7. But you don’t look sick

This sounds almost accusatory. As if to be a card-carrying cancer patient you must look the part of a cancer “sufferer”. As cancer patients, we have good days and bad days. On the good days, we look just fine. Other days not so much. How we look is not a reflection of what we are going through.

8. It’s only hair, it will grow back

On the flip side of #7, there are those comments you receive when you do show signs of being a cancer patient. When you lose your hair after starting chemotherapy, you may find your distress dismissed with “it’s only hair, it will grow back” or “lucky you have a nice shaped-head – you can carry off the bald look”.

9. Look on the bright side, at least you will lose weight without having to diet

The crassness of this statement seems hard to believe – but yes, it has been said to cancer patients. Another variation on the looking on the bright side theme – breast cancer patients quite often have to deal with people saying to them “at least you’ll get a free boob job.”

10. You must stay positive

I’ve saved the best for last. Ok, I admit that I caved in when I was first diagnosed with breast cancer to the pressure to be positive because it reassured the people around me. While I accept that for some people, maintaining a positive attitude is a valid coping mechanism, for myself, and for many others, being asked to always show our sunny side is a denial of the times we are in pain, anxious, and afraid.

So what should you say to someone with cancer?

Sometimes there are no right words to say. Sometimes the best you can do is listen, without judgment, without offering any well-meaning advice.

Author Rachel Naomi Remen says it better than I ever could.

“Perhaps the most important thing we ever give each other is our attention…. A loving silence often has far more power to heal and to connect than the most well-intentioned words.”

Having listened first, you could then say something like the following:

“I can’t begin to understand what you are going through/ I am so sorry you have to go through this. I am here for you. What one thing can I do for you right now?”

Knowing we’ve been heard and understood opens up a space for us to feel freer to ask for what we truly need at this moment.


[1] Nancy’s Point What Does Beating Cancer Mean Anyway?

Empowering One Another: Helping Your Healthcare Team Help You 

Life is all about making choices, and I think the same could be said about cancer in some capacity. If we take the time to think about it, we have choices in: 

  • What doctor we see for diagnosis and whether we seek a second opinion 
  • How we’re treated by our doctors and healthcare team 
  • What type of treatment we receive, if we’re lucky 
  • How we feel about our diagnosis and perceive our prognosis 
  • What we do with the information we receive and the knowledge we gain 

So you see, it’s all about empowering ourselves and our healthcare team. But how do we go about empowering our healthcare team in the choices we make? Here are ways to try: 

  • Tell them about your needs, including spiritually, emotionally, physically, and mentally. How can your healthcare team meet these when: 
  • Explaining your diagnosis and prognosis: 
  • Do they sugarcoat or “give it to you straight” based on what you told them about how you want to receive the information? 
  • Do they give all the details or only the “need to know” info? 
  • Do they communicate with you in a way that you understand? 
  • Do they give you resources to further educate yourself with?

Choosing your treatment options: 

Do they give you choices based only on what they know, or do they take into consideration research that you’ve done on various options, clinical trials, etc? 

Do they help with options based on what your insurance covers? 

During the treatment process: 

  • Are they readily available (or at least within 48 hours) to answer questions? 
  • Do they explain the process as it continues (ie. next steps)? 
  • Do they check on you to see how you’re doing? 

After treatment ends: 

  • Do they explain next steps? 
  • How often to get blood work, scans, routine appointments? 
  • Do they provide a survivorship care plan? 

All of this work that we do as patients goes hand in hand with how we want to be treated by our healthcare team. As we empower ourselves, we empower them too, and there’s nothing better than a great team that’s on the same page. 

12 Best Practice Tips To Design Helpful Patient Information Materials

As a patient advocate, you may be asked to help review or co-design patient information materials. Or you may wish to create the information yourself because you’ve noticed a gap in helpful information for your patient community.

Good patient information is important for several reasons.

Firstly, it reinforces what a healthcare provider has told the patient. If, due to stress, a patient hasn’t absorbed the information from their provider, a brochure or information sheet serves as a reminder.

Secondly, by educating patients, good information empowers patients with the knowledge, understanding, skills and confidence to take an active role in their health and wellbeing.

Thirdly, by sharing the information with friends and family, their loved ones can take a more active role in supporting the patient.

Whether it’s information for a brochure, leaflet or website, the same design principles apply. Information design should make complex information easy to use and understand, and ultimately empower patients to take a more active role in their care.

The following checklist is designed to help you in your own advocacy work when you are called upon to design patient information materials.

1. Know Your Purpose and Audience

Before you start, consider the purpose behind creating this information. What do you wish to achieve? For example, do you wish to increase understanding or raise awareness of a disease, or give instructions about a procedure or a medication?

Next, who are you creating this information for? Who is your intended reader? Are there health literacy challenges you will need to address with this audience? Consider if audio or video is needed if there are challenges for your audience in reading the information. Consider also if English is not a first language for your intended reader, will you need to create multiple versions of the content in different languages?

2. Use Plain English

Plain English is a way to write and present information so a reader can understand and act on it after a single reading.

Use plain, everyday words. For example, instead of “commence”, write “start”; instead of “in the event that”, use “if”.

Avoid jargon and acronyms. If you have to use medical terminology, explain the terms as you go along. If this clutters up your text, put the explanations in a glossary.

3. Write From The Perspective Of A Newly Diagnosed Patient

As patient advocates, we have most likely been immersed in our disease space for many years. We have become experts in the terminology and language of the medical world. We understand side-effects and know how to weigh up the pros and cons of treatment. But experts are made not born. Think back to those first few days and weeks of diagnosis. Remember the confusion and the uncertainty you probably felt at the time. Put yourself back into those shoes of a newly diagnosed patient and communicate from this perspective.

4. Make It Personal

Write as you would speak to the reader. Using personal pronouns such as “we” and “you” helps create a sense of relatability and trust.

5. Use Direct Language

Adopt present and active tense to make sentences more direct (e.g.” the nurse can vaccinate your child” rather than “ your child can be vaccinated by the nurse”.)

6. Design For Readability

Use short sentences and only include one main point in each sentence.

Try to avoid using hyphens and semicolons.

Keep capitalization to a minimum. Capital letters are harder on the eye. Use lowercase letters throughout the text. Save capital letters for the start of sentences and names.

Left align paragraphs. Left-aligned paragraphs make text easier to read than justified text. Justified text can create gaps between words, which slows down reading particularly for people with dyslexia.

7. Avoid Dense Text

Dense text means patients lose concentration and therefore cannot find the information required. To avoid this, keep your paragraphs short. Short, clear, separated chunks of text encourage those with reading difficulty to continue reading.

Use headings and paragraph breaks to separate blocks of information.

Good use of large text, white space and columns can also help readers to more easily assimilate information. Make sure related information is located together and not split over different columns.

8. Pay Attention to Typography

Typography is the art and technique of arranging type to make written language legible, readable and appealing when displayed. No matter how well written the text is, if it is set out in a typography which is difficult to read, it is going to adversely affect readability and comprehension.

Choose Arial or Calibri type fonts for readability. When it comes to font size, 10 point is too small for most people to read. 12 point is more suitable. Choose 14 point for older people and children. 16 point is used for partially sighted people. Finally spacing between the lines should be 1.5 line spacings.

9. Use Design To Enhance Comprehension

How the information is set out in the document is an important feature of readability and comprehension. People tend to scan when they read information (this is particularly true of online information), so your document should have a logical order and structure to help readers find their way through the information.

You can achieve this in a number of ways, including the use of reversed text (e.g. white lettering on a dark background), headings and subheadings in bold font, bullet or number points. Use bold instead of italics and underlining as italics or underlining make text harder to read.

When using bulleted lists, make sure each item follows logically in sequence. Keep lists to a maximum of eight points where possible and start and end a list on the same column or page.

Tip: Use callouts to highlight key messages for content skimmers.

10. Choose Good Visuals

Visuals such as pictures, diagrams and photos can sometimes say more than words. Ensure the images you use are real, relatable and sympathetic to the reader.

Avoid idealized, ‘photo-shoot’-style images of people.

Choose images that are inclusive. Use images that don’t reinforce negative or stereotypical attitudes especially for ethnicity, age or gender.

11. Be Consistent

Be consistent in your use of design features, such as headings, sub-headings, etc. Describe numbers consistently (for example, don’t use percent on one line and fractions on the next).

12. Signpost to Other Sources of Information

Including other useful sources of information, such as helplines of patient organizations and general sources of medical information is a valuable source of further information and support for patients.

Do not confuse people by covering several treatments and conditions in the same leaflet. Tell people what other information, resources and support are available to them.

Conclusion

Next time you are called upon to design patient information materials, use the checklist in this article to guide you. Providing patients with accurate and actionable information is essential in delivering high quality care to patients and an important element in our patient advocacy.

Patient Advocacy: 7 Ways To Access Medical Journal Articles For Free

Has this ever happened to you? You come across a tweet with a link to a new study in your disease area and you eagerly click on it only to find it leads you to a journal article behind a paywall.   

I’ve lost count of the number of times this has happened to me and the frustration I feel at not being able to access a relevant study without paying an amount I cannot afford. To purchase a single article can cost upwards of $100.  

Over the years I’ve discovered there are some ways to get around this paywall.  Below I’ve outlined 7 tips on gaining access to journal articles. These methods may not always give you access to the full article, but they are certainly worth trying in your search for peer-reviewed literature to better understand your health condition. 

1. Search Google Scholar

Google Scholar provides a simple way to broadly search for journal articles, alongside books from academic publishers.  The site harvests the content of institutional repositories and links them in one record. 

2. Explore online databases

Similar to Google Scholar, there are several online repositories of academic papers free to search online. As I said above, you may not always be able to access the full article, but you will be able to read the study abstract (an abstract is a short summary of the research contained within the study.)  

Core is a search engine and index for aggregated research publications from repositories and journals globally.  

Dimensions is a next-generation linked research information system that makes it easier to find and access the most relevant information. Developed in collaboration with over 100 leading research organizations around the world, it brings together over 128 million publications. Users of the free version can use the Open Access filter to find articles. 

The Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) is a list of nearly 10,000 open access journals and a search service finding peer-reviewed and scholarly journals and articles.  

PubMed, maintained by the US National Library of Medicine, is a free search engine covering the biomedical and life sciences going back as far back as 1951. 

JSTOR gives you access to more than 12 million journal articles in upwards of 75 disciplines, providing full-text searches of more than 2,000 journals, and access to more than 5,000 Open Access books. 

Web of Science covers more than 20,000 carefully selected journals, along with books, conference proceedings, and other sources.  

Science.gov covers the vast territory of United States federal science, including more than 60 databases and 2,200-plus websites.

3. Search for pre-printed publications

OSF Preprints is a platform with openly accessible preprints, or submitted manuscripts that are publically distributed before acceptance and peer-review in a traditional scientific journal. An advantage of publishing preprints is the speeding up of scientific communication and of sharing research results earlier, as it can take a long time between submission of an article till publication. OSF Preprints is developed by the Centre for Open Science (COS), a non-profit organization with the goal of greater openness and reproducible research.

4. Download an app

I have installed an app called Unpaywall as a browser extension on my laptop.  

Unpaywall is an open database of 29,624,840 free scholarly articles. The app harvests content from legal sources including repositories run by universities, governments, and scholarly societies, as well as open (free access) content hosted by publishers themselves. 

Open Access Button is another plugin for Chrome or Firefox that works similarly to Unpaywall. Click on the button while you are viewing a pay-walled journal article and it will search for open access versions.  

5. Ask a university librarian or academic

Did you know that people with access to university databases usually have “free” access to all journal articles, because their university pays for it?  If you know someone who works in a university library or is affiliated with an academic institution, it’s worth asking them if they can help you get access to a paywalled journal. 

6. Ask the author for it

While the publisher owns the article, the author will have a legal version he or she can share. Many authors are happy to share a pdf version of their published article. The author’s academic affiliation will be published alongside the article and sometimes this will include their email address. If not a simple Google search should help you find the author’s email contact.   

Metastatic breast cancer patient, Martha Carlson (@Martha__Carlson) says reaching out in this way can be productive. “I’ve had article PDFs sent to me by reaching out to the author and also through other advocates,” she explained.  

ResearchGate and Academia.edu are both platforms that facilitate making contact with researchers and requesting copies of their articles.  

Note: Do NOT share an article an author has given you anywhere online as this will breach the publisher’s copyright rules. 

7. Rent the article

Finally, some journals allow you to “rent” an article for considerably less than buying it. Ok so this tip isn’t free, but if all else fails, it may be your best option.  

I hope you find these tips helpful. As patients and patient advocates, it is important that we can access the latest evidence-based research to help us advocate for ourselves and others.  

Below you will find a list of websites linked to the sites and tools mentioned in this article. 

Useful Sites

Google Scholar:https://scholar.google.com 

Core: https://core.ac.uk 

Dimensions: https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication 

The Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ): https://doaj.org 

PubMed: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov 

Web of Science: https://clarivate.com/webofsciencegroup/solutions/web-of-science 

Science.gov: https://www.science.gov 

OSF Preprints: https://osf.io/preprints 

Centre for Open Science: https://www.cos.io 

Unpaywall: http://unpaywall.org 

Open Access Button:https://openaccessbutton.org 

ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net 

Academia.edu: https://www.academia.edu 

What Do You Do When Your Doctor Tells You Not To Google?

What do you do when your doctor tells you not to Google?  A recent Twitter conversation prompted this question, so I set out to answer it with the help of the patient advocate community.

Not surprisingly the first answer I received was firmly focused on the benefits patients found when they turned to the internet.

Why Do Patients Go Online?

Carolyn Thomas (@heartsisters) takes a pragmatic approach to searching for information online. “Personally, I wouldn’t even buy a coffee maker without checking with Google first to learn as much as I could about useful things like reliability, product features or where to get the best value,” she says. “And if my first stop is an online search for relatively minor things like a coffee pot, you can be absolutely sure that I’m going to ask Dr. Google about truly important things like troubling health symptoms.”

Jennifer Douglas (@mmejendouglas) agrees. “ Whenever a new situation comes up in my family or health I immediately take time to search the internet for more information,” she says.

Vanessa Carter (@_faceSA) calls the internet one of her “greatest allies as a patient who survived an antibiotic-resistant infection that nearly obliterated my face.”  She describes how “without information about antibiotic resistance easily accessible to me on the internet in multiple realms including on websites, journal articles and social media, I do not believe I would have survived such an aggressive antibiotic-resistant infection which required me to participate equally in the management of it, both in and out of hospital settings, at home and even when I lay in an intensive care unit wondering whether my body would get through another day of excruciating pain.”

Many patients cite the reason they turn online is to be able to close the information gap that exists when they can’t get the information they need from their healthcare providers.  As Vanessa explains, “when my doctor or alternative care provider like a nurse or pharmacist was not there to answer my wide-ranging questions such as how to manage my surgical wounds better, or how I could play a role towards improving my antibiotic adherence, and why it mattered to my infection, it was Dr. Google that filled that communication gap.”

Having said that, Vanessa also acknowledges “over time that not all the information I found online was constructive.”  Terri Coutee (@6state) agrees.  “The internet and Dr. Google are a highway of potential disaster unless you utilize the proper navigation tools to do a deeper dive into what is often a life-changing decision.”

Vanessa dealt with this by carefully evaluating the information and then “asked a willing doctor in my healthcare team to validate it,” adding, “I was the information seeker, and the doctor was my compass.” A nice way to convey that in general patients don’t see their information searches as a substitute for clinical advice, rather we still value traditional physician-patient consultations as important to our understanding of online health information.

Building Trust Through Information Sharing

Vanessa’s comment leads me to reflect on patients’ internet information seeking as an opportunity to strengthen trust between doctor and patient.

Research bears this out.

When researchers Sharon Swee-Lin Tan and Nadee Goonawarden systematically reviewed existing research on patients’ internet health information seeking and its influence on the patient-physician relationship, they found that it can improve the patient-physician relationship. [1]

According to the researchers, a majority of patients had felt more comfortable with information from health care providers because of their internet searches and felt more confident with the doctor’s advice.  Interestingly, patients who shared online information felt that they received more attention from their physician, compared with non-sharers.

“I think that it is valuable for patients to be affirmed in their desire to better understand their unique diagnosis,” notes Jennifer. “When I brought my research to my doctor’s visits it enabled me to participate more fully in the discussion about my treatment.  In one situation, I met with my radiation oncologist and brought up my research about the possibility of long-term nerve damage after radiation.  She affirmed that it was a remote possibility, but was also able to share that in her professional career, she had never seen a patient have that particular side effect.  I liked that she recognized that this could be a rare side effect, but was willing to share her years of experience with me during the conversation.  I think that a collaborative approach between patients and health care providers can lead to better understanding and perhaps better quality of life for us, the patients.”

Barbara Jacoby (@letlifehappen) is concerned that the “don’t google it” instruction is an arrogant attitude that is deeply entrenched in the medical community. “One of the main reasons for my work is to improve the doctor-patient narrative in order to improve outcomes,” she explains. “And if my doctor says to me that I should not do my own research on Dr. Google, they are saying to me that they know everything and that tells me that I have the wrong doctor.”

Metastatic breast cancer patient, Ilene Kaminsky (@ilenealizah) recalls how her first oncologist “essentially told me to stay off Google. I felt very uncomfortable with her suggestion that she was the de facto source of information on my disease.”

MS patient, Robert Joyce (@A30MinuteLife) is also of the opinion that this attitude “doesn’t reflect well on any medical professional if they are telling us not to get information. It means, to me, they are not sure themselves and are afraid of being caught out. If healthcare providers want us, the patient, to trust them, we need to be an equal partner at the table. This builds trust.”

Ilene wishes health professionals would act as our partners in wellness. “And as our partners, it’s their responsibility to see to it that we have access to information,” she says. “Suggesting that we not do our own research, read the many books (or listen to audiobooks or podcasts) about our disease is not only ridiculously ignorant but also impossible. We’ll do it anyway, we just won’t come to them when we have questions for fear of reprimand. Not the healthiest outcome for either patient or physician.”

Doctors Google Too!

Not all doctors are averse to Dr. Google.

“In general, my experience has been with doctors who suggest checking something on the internet, even to the point my GP has looked it up, in my presence, to show me some information,” says Robert.

Male breast cancer advocate, Rod Ritchie (@malefitness) has this to say, “so tired of hearing don’t Google medical information. Obviously, my doctor is too, today we searched together for side effects that a drug might have.”

Carolyn, on the other hand, wishes her physician HAD gone online when she visited the Emergency Department with heart attack symptoms. “I now wish that the Emergency Department physician who misdiagnosed my cardiac symptoms had bothered to Google before misdiagnosing me and sending me home,” she says, “because I’m pretty sure that had he Googled central chest pain, nausea, sweating and pain down your left arm, Dr. Google would have come up with only one possible search result: myocardial infarction!!”

How Do Patients Wish Their Healthcare Providers Treat Online Information Searches?

As patients have better access to health information through the internet and expect to be more engaged in health decision making, traditional models of the patient-physician relationship need to be adapted to patients’ changing needs by incorporating their perspective into a relationship-centered medical paradigm.

“Suggesting that patients refrain from Googling is completely inappropriate and out of step with the times,” points out Nancy Stordahl (@nancyspoint). “Besides, by the time a patient lands in front of a doctor, she/he has likely already done a fair amount of Googling. Rather than suggesting no Googling, better advice might be to encourage patients to bring concerns, questions, or whatever that they uncover so such issues can be addressed or clarified. If a doctor told me to refrain from Googling, I’d wonder what she didn’t want me to find out. I’d head straight home and you guessed it, start Googling!”

So what can we do to address this disconnect between the fact that patients WILL search online for health information and the reality that by and large patients are discouraged from doing so?

“Physicians must by now realize that their patients are ALREADY online,” declares Carolyn. “Instead of warning them NOT to do what they’ve been doing for years, a more realistic response would be to give each  patient a prescription-style list of credible websites to check if they do need more information.”

There was much agreement on this point.

“The medical profession must accept information is available all around us and we will see it,” Robert explains. “To ensure we see the right content, we must know the right places to look, and it is the healthcare professional who should be responsible for being our guide.”

Metastatic breast cancer patient Abigail Johnston (@amjohnston1315) makes clear that “no one is more motivated to research and learn and look for more treatment options than a patient with a serious or chronic illness.  Rather than attempting to reserve all the knowledge for themselves, doctors and patients would be much better served by fostering a partnership in the best interests of the patient.”

Abigail recounts that “ironically this just happened with me and my doctor yesterday.  I sent her the link to a study, she called me and we talked about how the trial might fit into my lines of treatment.   She’d never heard of the study and added it to her repertoire.  It’s Phase 1 now but may be helpful later.  This is how it works when it works well!”

Conclusion

The patients I talked to were unanimous in the belief that supporting patients in their online information-seeking activities and guiding them to reliable sources of information builds a relationship of trust and empowers patients to take a more active role in their care. To quote Vanessa, “I’m thankful I had doctors who were willing to support me using any tools at my disposal to empower myself, even though they were far from perfect, because we had both almost lost hope, yet here I am, another e-Patient who survived because I had the right support to desperately seek out the answers I needed.”


[1] Tan SS, Goonawardene N Internet Health Information Seeking and the Patient-Physician Relationship: A Systematic Review

J Med Internet Res 2017;19(1):e9

Patient Advocacy: Ten Tips For Twitter Success

I love Twitter. It’s one of my favorite places on the Internet, and one of the few sites I visit more than once a day.

I’ve been a Twitter user for over a decade and in that time I’ve found it has been one of the best places on the Internet to advance my advocacy efforts. From crowdsourcing quotes and opinions, to keeping current with medical research, Twitter continues to be my go-to source for information and collaboration.

Learning Twitter is like anything else in life. The more you use it, the more you learn, and the better you get at using it.

But you don’t have to spend years learning how to become a Twitter pro.

Today I am going to share with you some of my best tips to shortcut your journey to Twitter success.

1.Make Your Profile Stand Out

People are highly visual, and the first thing we notice in a Twitter profile is the picture and the bio.  Most profile images are now mainly viewed on mobile devices. This means that the image itself has to be recognizable in smaller dimensions than it appears on a desktop or laptop screen. These smaller images are known as ‘thumbnails’. For your image to work as a thumbnail, your face must predominate in the original image. Think of framing your picture around your head and shoulders.

Below you’ll find the recommended guidelines for a Twitter thumbnail:

  • Square Image 400 x 400 pixels
  • Maximum file size 5 MB
  • Image types include: JPG, GIF or PNG

You also have an opportunity to personalize your Twitter profile by uploading a custom header image (similar to a Facebook cover photo).  This is prime real estate on Twitter so make the most of the opportunity to bring more creativity and authenticity to your account (for example you might use a picture of yourself holding a sign with a hard-hitting message).

Here are the recommended guidelines for header images:

  • 1,500 x 500 pixels
  • Maximum file size of 5 MB
  • Image types include: JPG, GIF or PNG

Insider Tip:  Go to Canva.com to find a template to create your Twitter header image. Canva templates are already sized to the right dimensions.

2. Craft Your Bio

Alongside your profile image, your bio is usually the first thing people see when deciding whether to follow you on Twitter.  However trying to capture your passion and experience to fit Twitter’s 160 character limit for a bio can be a challenge.  You won’t be able to express all you want to say, so think of this as the opportunity to provide a brief snapshot of who you are and what you do.

Here are some things to consider when it comes to crafting your Twitter bio:

  • How will you describe yourself to pique people’s interest to learn more about your work?
  • Which of your accomplishments will you highlight in your bio?
  • Is there a project you are currently working on? Or a campaign you are part of? Can you link to it in your bio?
  • Are there disease-specific or campaign hashtags you can include?

Insider Tip: Content posted on Twitter is indexed by Google so it makes sense to use keywords in your bio and in your tweets. Think about things that people would search for to find you — a good tip is to look at the Twitter accounts of other advocates in your disease area to see which keywords they’re using.

3. Follow The Right People

If you’re new to Twitter begin by following relevant organizations – non-profits, patient groups, hospitals, etc. Twitter will then auto-suggest people who also follow this account for you.

Follow healthcare professionals, researchers and patient advocates who are tweeting about issues related to your illness. The easiest way to find conversations of interest is to click the native search facility at the top of your Twitter screen and enter disease-specific keywords and hashtags.

Insider Tip: It’s a good idea to organize your followers into Lists. You can create your own Lists or subscribe to Lists created by others.  New to Twitter Lists?  Follow my step by step guide to creating Lists at https://bit.ly/2OOEl18

4. Create Twitter Threads

A thread on Twitter is a series of connected Tweets from one person. With a thread, you can provide additional context, an update, or an extended point by connecting multiple tweets together. When used well, threads are a powerful way to illustrate a larger point.

Learn how to create a Twitter Thread at https://bit.ly/3sktRoa

5. Shorten Your URL Links With Bit.ly

A URL shortener is an online tool that converts a regular URL (website address)  into an abbreviated version that is around 10 to 20 characters long. Use a third-party tool like Bit.ly.com to help you do this.

Insider Tip: Bit.ly does more than just shorten links. You can use it to see how your links are performing in real-time, with insights that show you which content or channel is working best for you, including total clicks and top referring social channels.

6. Use Hashtags Wisely

Hashtags tie public conversations from different users into a single stream, allowing you to connect more easily with existing conversations and discover new people who are tweeting about the healthcare topics you are interested in.  Twitter’s own research into hashtags shows that there is significant advantage to using them. Users can see a marked increase in engagement simply by using relevant and popular hashtags in their tweets.

Insider Tip: Don’t over-do hashtags.  When #you use #too #many #hashtags your #tweet looks like #spam.  Aim to have no more than 2-3 hashtags per tweet. Research shows that tweets with more than two hashtags actually see a drop in engagement.

7. Add More Images To Tweets

Adding visual appeal to your tweet is a smart way to make your content stand out among a sea of content.  You can add up to 4 images to your tweets  – all you have to do is click on the photo icon after you have added your first image, then add up to 3 more images.  Take advantage of this and create a carousel of images to draw a reader’s eye.

Insider Tip: Want to add a GIF to your tweet? Twitter has made it very easy to add GIFs by doing all the work for you within the tweet box. All you have to do is choose an appropriate GIF from the drop-down menu or search for a specific genre in the search box. Photo and GIF attachments do not count towards the character limit in a Tweet. Photos can be up to 5MB; animated GIFs can be up to 5MB on mobile, and up to 15MB on the web.

8. Develop a Regular Posting Schedule

On Twitter, the average lifespan of a tweet is 18 minutes. This means that the more you post, the more of an opportunity you have to get seen.

Insider Tip:  Use a scheduling tool like Buffer or Hootsuite to schedule your updates to reach more people, more often.

9. Join a Twitter Chat

A Twitter Chat is a public Twitter conversation around one unique hashtag. This hashtag allows you to follow the discussion and participate in it. Twitter chats can be one-off events, but more usually are recurring weekly chats to regularly connect people. The chat will be hosted and the host will ask questions along the way to stimulate discussion and sharing of ideas. Popular Twitter chats include #bcsm; #lcsm; #gyncsm; #patientchat.

Insider Tip: There are chats for most disease topics and a full list can be found by searching the database of the Healthcare Hashtag Project at Symplur.com.

10. Pin Your Best Content

Use the “Pinned Tweet” function to showcase your most valuable content at the top of your Twitter profile. In the past, Twitter typically only allowed viewers to see posts in a sequential timeline which meant that your most important or relevant content quickly got lost in the fast-moving Twitter stream. To solve this issue Twitter now allows you to “pin” a tweet (i.e. keep it placed at the top of your newsfeed) giving you more editorial control on what a viewer will see first when visiting your page. Follow this link to learn how to pin a tweet: https://bit.ly/3ggn6RI

Insider Tip: Set a reminder to update your pinned content so it doesn’t appear out-dated. Change the content regularly to highlight the most current campaign or project you are involved with.

Wrapping Up

The key to success with any form of social media is to work smarter not harder. These tips will help you increase your follower count, reach a wider audience, and boost your engagement on Twitter. Implement these tactics the next time you post on Twitter and watch your engagement start to climb.

Here’s to your Twitter success!

Empowered Patients Empower Patients: How to Take Charge of Your Diagnosis

What comes to your mind when you think of the word “empowerment?” Do you think of a specific person, thing, or event? What about an “empowered” patient? Do you think of a patient or patient advocate who goes above and beyond and fights for their health care, or embodies themselves with a wealth of knowledge about a specific disease? At the Patient Empowerment Network (PEN), we believe that patients have power. They have the power to learn about and understand their diagnosis, find a healthcare team that understands their needs, values, and morals, and support other patients on their cancer journey – all to create better health outcomes. Are you looking to become an empowered patient? Here a few ways:

  • One of the most important things about your journey is that it is your own. No cancer diagnosis is alike, just like no patient is alike. Your story is unique, and the power of sharing your story is unmatched. Storytelling is what connects others and develops strong bonds. Share your story with your family and friends, post about it on social media, and connect with patient advocacy organizations (including PEN!) to share your story across the globe. 
  • Create your own advocacy blog: This article has how-tos and best tips. 
  • Participate in Tweet chats: Tweet chats are chats that occur on Twitter at different times/days using a hashtag. PEN has a tweet chat called #patientchat that occurs every other Friday. These chats are hosted by a variety of organizations around different topics. As a participant, you answer a series of questions prompted by the host. It can be a great environment to express your opinions and talk about your experience. You can find Tweet chats relevant to you by using Symplur’s Healthcare Hashtag Project, which lists hashtags specific to what you’re looking for. You can also see if specific organizations you’re following on Twitter host chats or start your own! 
  • Join a support group in-person or online. There are a number of different organizations that offer support groups (here are some of my favorites!) where you can share your story and hear other’s, ask questions, and relax knowing you’re in a judgement-free environment. 
  • Utilize PEN’s Digitally Empowered Program: This program consists of 10 modules with videos and resource guides to navigate all that technology has to offer including navigating healthcare resources, forming a support network, using social media, navigating your health with different devices and apps, and using telemedicine. 
  • Keep updated on the latest research about your diagnosis, and share what you find relevant to you with your healthcare team and/or on social media. This article explains how to read scientific papers. 
  • Utilize PEN’s online resources tailored to the cancer community, as well as specific cancers, that focus on what to do when you’re newly diagnosed, testing and treatment options, clinical trials, and accessing and affording healthcare. 

12 Actionable Tips For Social Media Success in 2021

2020! What a year it was for all of us.  In the advocacy world, we saw an unprecedented shift towards online activities.  We relied on zoom calls, webinars and social networks to keep us connected and informed.  Where many organizations and individuals may in the past have used social media as an add-on to in person events, this past year saw the virtual world take centre stage, and with it the need for a stronger social media presence.

I spent the latter half of 2020 teaching social media skills to more patient organizations than I have at any other time in the past decade. The realization that mastering social media has become an essential advocacy tool was brought home to us more than ever this year.

With hope on the horizon that vaccination may bring us closer to something resembling normality again, it is yet unclear how long it will take before the old way of doing things resumes. It is predicted that for 2021 at least we will still be relying heavily on online activities in the advocacy world.

To help you strengthen your online presence and create more visibility for your cause in the new year, I’ve put together this list of 12 actionable tips you can put into practice over the coming months. By following these monthly prompts I predict that come this time next year, you will be able to look back with satisfaction on all you’ve achieved over the previous 12 months.

January

Set SMART Social Media Goals

Get your 2021 social media activities off to a flying start by setting some SMART social media goals for your online activities.

Goals are the forerunner to success. Ask yourself what you would most like to achieve with social media this year, and then set specific and actionable goals to achieve it. For a goal to become a reality it needs to be specific, measurable, attainable, and realistic, as well as time specific. These are often called SMART goals.

February

Conduct a Social Media Audit

Take some time this month to audit your social media activities. A social media audit is a great way to take stock of where you’re at and identify what you can improve on going forward.

Start by creating a simple spreadsheet and list all your social accounts, including those you set up but haven’t used in a while.  Audit how often you are posting on each platform and list which times you are posting and the results you are getting. How engaged is your audience with you on each of your social networks?  It’s a good idea to benchmark where your social activities are at so that when it comes to the end of the year you can look back and see what has worked for you.

Some further things to audit:

  • Have you fully completed your About sections on each network?
  • Are your biographical details up to date?
  • Do you need to include a new call-to-action?
  • Do your cover photos needed updating? Are you still showing that summer picture now that it’s winter?

Want to dive deeper? Download my step-by-step guide to conducting a social media audit at http://bit.ly/3pvjVa5

March

Perform a Content Audit

Look back at your ten most recent pieces of content — blogs, images, videos, etc. Which content worked best for you in terms of engagement (i.e. comments, shares, etc.)? Can you do more with this content?  For example, can you highlight some key statistics and share on social media in a more visual format?  For more ideas on repurposing content visit http://bit.ly/3rEZwBl.

What about the content you spent a lot of time creating which didn’t generate significant engagement? Ask yourself (or even better ask a friend)  if it’s immediately clear what message you are trying to convey.  Can you rework this content to make it more compelling – updating any outdated information, adding new research, refreshing images, etc.

April

Conquer Content Curation

The ability to curate credible content to share with our communities is a key skill for patient advocates. Hereditary cancer advocate, Amy Byer Shainman (@BRCAResponder) believes “patient advocates not only have a responsibility to curate trusted content but that it is an imperative if you are even going to be calling yourself a patient advocate.”

Content curation is defined as the process of gathering information relevant to a particular topic or area of interest.  While this definition sounds simple, there’s a world of difference between simply gathering information and being an effective curator. A good curator knows how to find, aggregate, and synthesize reliable information, putting it into context for their communities and sharing it in a format that is easy to access and understand.

Want to learn more? Go to http://bit.ly/2WSGIAv for my ten golden rules of content curation.

May

Develop an e-Newsletter

This month, consider developing an online newsletter. With the popularity of social media, you may think e-newsletters outdated, but nothing could be further from the truth.   While you can go for a few days without checking social media, most people check their email several times a day. E-newsletters can help you build relationships and credibility and keep your activities to the forefront of people’s minds.

If you blog, use an e-newsletter to send a digest of your most recent blog posts. “I would advise anyone who wants to increase readership to her/his blog to consider sending out a monthly or weekly email with links to new posts and possibly one or two older ones,” recommends breast cancer blogger Nancy Stordahl (@nancyspoint).  “I also share a couple of articles that have been in the news, or that I think might be of interest to my subscribers,” says Nancy.  “Sometimes I share something personal and I often bounce around ideas. I love my subscribers and always value their input!”

Even if you don’t blog, you can still keep your subscribers updated with the latest research and news from the advocacy world by sending a regular e-newsletter. You can also share links to these newsletters on your social media channels.

June

Create Visual Impact

This month is all about getting creative with your visual assets. Visual content is 40x more likely to get shared on social media than other types of content according to research. Furthermore, people connect more emotionally with images than text, and in an increasingly crowded digital landscape images can break through the online content clutter. The type of visual assets you can create include images, videos, infographics, quotes and GIFs.

Check out my guide to creating professional looking graphics at https://bit.ly/3mYMzPe

Related: Patient Advocacy: 10 Ways To Create Share Worthy Content For Social Media

July

Build Your Authority on LinkedIn

Your LinkedIn profile is the cornerstone of your professional brand online. It’s so much more than a place to park your resume.

Take some time to identify how top patient advocates are using LinkedIn to build their thought leadership on the platform. You’ll find they are showing up consistently, publishing thought-provoking commentary and original think pieces and generating high levels of engagement with industry leaders.  The wonderful thing about LinkedIn, as with all social media, is the ability to show up on a level playing field. The same opportunities to build online visibility are open to all – so take full advantage of this by doing more with your LinkedIn profile this month.

Start by optimizing your Linkedin profile at http://bit.ly/2wTorK3

August

Tap Into The Power of SlideShare

Many of us who do speaking engagements have built up our own library of slide-decks over the years. This month dust off those decks and upload them to SlideShare.

SlideShare is the world’s largest professional content sharing community. Surprisingly, given how the platform is optimized for social sharing, including the ability to embed presentations, it’s often overlooked and underused. And because it’s owned by LinkedIn, it’s super easy to highlight your uploads on LinkedIn’s platform – giving your thought leadership a further boost.

Take time to create visually impactful slides – even if this means re-doing some of your original slides.

Boring slides don’t get many views. Make sure to optimize for mobile viewers with big, bold visuals and text that is readable on mobile devices. New to SlideShare? Check out these tips: http://bit.ly/2XcrsyN

September

Increase Facebook Reach

Despite privacy concerns, Facebook still reigns supreme in the advocacy world. However there’s a problem when it comes to making an impact on Facebook. When organic Facebook Reach (i.e. the number of people who see your content without paid distribution) is estimated to currently be as low as 1–3%, succeeding on the platform is more difficult than ever.  Take time this month to consider ways to increase your organic reach and boost engagement on Facebook.

Facebook recommends each post you create should include some type of creative, like images, GIFs or videos. Make sure these creative assets are high quality. Avoid using blurry images or videos or creative that doesn’t accurately reflect your message.

For more tips on increasing Facebook reach, go to http://bit.ly/3pydfIk

October

Get Creative with Instagram

When it comes to consistent engagement, Instagram (now owned by Facebook) is the number one social channel out there. Recent studies have found the engagement rate on Instagram Is 45% greater than on Facebook.  Instagram is the perfect platform to let your creativity run free and, in fact, even have some fun in the process.

If you’re new to Instagram there is a lot to learn. Check out my SlideShare deck to help you get started: http://bit.ly/3rDBKph

November

Become a Twitterholic

Twitter is a powerful tool to help raise awareness of your cause, keep current with research, amplify your advocacy activities, and build collaborative relationships. Twitter thrives on its community and the more you connect with other users the more quickly you will grow your own following.

Joining a Twitter chat is a super way to connect and engage. When you attend a Twitter chat regularly, people will get to know you and in this way, you can quickly develop and grow your own network of supporters.  Twitter chats can be one-off events, but more usually are recurring weekly chats to regularly connect people, for example #PatientChat held every other Friday at 10:00 am Pacific/1:00 pm Eastern.

Many people tell me they “don’t get” Twitter, but I would encourage you to give it a try. You don’t even have to tweet to take part – you can learn a lot from following the right people and listening.

December

Evaluate Your Progress

It’s the end of your social media year. Time to look back and evaluate how far you’ve come over the previous 12 months.

Some key metrics to track are the number of followers you attract and retain, which social media channels drive the most traffic to your website, the number of comments you get, and how many times your updates have been shared. Most social media platforms have their own basic measurement and analytics tools, which you can use to gain information about views and engagement. Take note of what’s working for you – do more of this – and consider dropping things that aren’t generating much engagement.

Here’s to your social media success!

How to Create a Month’s Worth of Posts for Your Advocacy Blog

Are you looking for a way to boost your advocacy activities online?

One of the best ways to do this is to create a blog.  Blogging shows your commitment and passion for your cause and because a blog is interactive, it’s also an extremely effective way to build a community and engage more people in your cause.

If you are brand new to blogging, and not quite sure how to start a blog, this step-by-step guide will get you up and running.

Many of us who blog start out with great intentions of writing regularly, but over time our inspiration well can run dry. Creating a blog is relatively easy; the challenge lies in consistently creating fresh content. Cancer blogger, Nancy Stordahl (@nancyspoint) recommends a consistent blogging schedule if you want to develop a loyal readership. “This takes commitment,” she explains, “which means posting on a regular schedule that works for you. This might be weekly, every other week or monthly. This way readers know what to expect, plus it keeps you focused. I post weekly (usually the same day) because that’s what works for me. Consistency is key.”

In this article, I want to share with you a month’s worth of things to write about. Whether you’re new to blogging and looking for ideas to get started, or you’ve been blogging for a while but your writing has stalled, the following tips are designed to kick-start your writing efforts.  Commit to consistency by writing one blog post a week for the next month with these topic ideas as your guide.

10 Ways to Create a Month’s Worth of Blog Posts

1. Share Facts and Answer Questions for Your Readers

You might like to start by asking your readers what kind of questions they have that you can answer for them.  You could use Instagram, Twitter or Facebook to do this or you could search on a question and answer platform like Quora. On Quora you can ask a question about your topic or simply do a search using your topic keyword to find what people are asking about that topic. Make a list of those questions which you feel you could write about. When you have written a blog post on the topic, go back into Quora and answer a question related to the topic. You can include a link to your post in your answer.

2. Recycle Old Posts

Recycling content simply means taking one piece of content and finding a new way to create content around it. Identify your most popular content through your blog analytics tool. Now brainstorm some ways in which you can take this content and turn into a fresh post.  Can you turn it into a video or audio post? Are there any new research or treatment updates you can add since you first published this post? Can you get creative and create an infographic or develop a downloadable checklist using the original post as a starting point? You’ve already spent time and effort in creating your content, now spend a little more time to maximize that effort.

3. Compile a Glossary of Medical Terms

One of the things I remember most when I was a newly diagnosed patient was how mystifying the world of cancer was for me. I had to learn a whole new language consisting of unknown medical terms and scientific jargon to be able to understand my diagnosis. Make the process less mystifying for newly diagnosed patients by putting together a useful list of medical and scientific terms (as I did with this Clinical Trials Jargon Buster) and publishing it on your blog.

4. Share the Latest Medical Research in Your Disease Area

Have you been to a conference where you learned about new medical research? Or read about the latest research in a medical journal?  Let your readers know about it through your blog by providing a summary of the key findings and translating the information into easy to understand language for other patients.

5. Create a Reader’s Poll

There are several online tools you can use to create a readers’ poll. If you have a WordPress.com site, then you’ve already got Polldaddy polls built in. You can create, manage, and see results for all of your polls directly in your WordPress.com dashboard. If you use a self-hosted WordPress site, install the Polldaddy WordPress.org plugin. Once you’ve collected your poll data, publish a follow-up post with your findings.

6. Write about a Typical Day in Your Life

What’s it like to live with your condition on a day-by-day basis? What insights can you share to help others understand what a typical day is like for you and patients like you? Can you share helpful tips to cope with common everyday difficulties? Do you have advice for how family and friends can help you navigate your illness? As a person with lived experience you are in a unique position to shed light on what it’s like to cope with your illness by writing about it on your blog.

7. Embed Slide-Decks of Your Talks

Have you recently spoken at an event? Did you use slides in your presentation? Did you know you can upload your slide-decks directly to a platform called SlideShare? This is a great way to develop a portfolio of your speaking work and showcase it on your blog by simply inserting the embed code provided by SlideShare.

8. Invite a Guest Blogger to Write For You

Inviting another patient or healthcare professional you admire to write for you, not only expands your blog’s reach and readership, but adds a valuable new perspective to your site. For example, each week, Nancy Stordahl invites a different metastatic breast cancer patient to share their story on her blog for her regular #MetsMonday post.

9. Create Recurring Content

Creating regular recurring content, like Nancy does with #MetsMonday, is another excellent way to keep consistent with your content creation. Another suggestion is to create a round-up post each week – this could be a round-up of the latest research or a link to useful resources and articles you think would be helpful to share with your readers. Pick a day for this and stick to that day each week so readers know what they can consistently expect from you.

10. Plan Posts around Seasons and Events

This final tip is one of the easiest ways to create content on your blog that you can use on a regular basis. For example a post on how to survive the holiday season, or healthy eating during the holidays is a post you can use year after year. Add the dates of awareness days, such as World Cancer Day, to your calendar as a reminder to create content around these events.

An MPN Care Partner Shares Why He’s Optimistic About the Future

An MPN Care Partner Shares Why He’s Optimistic About the Future from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Care partner Jeff Bushnell, husband of myelofibrosis (MF) patient advocate Summer Golden, explains why he’s hopeful about their future together. Jeff shares key resources that have helped him stay educated and maintain optimism.

Summer Golden and Jeff Bushnell have been married for over 20 years. When Summer was diagnosed with myelofibrosis (MF), Jeff took on the role of care partner and advocate. Summer uses her years of theatre training and comedy to cope with her condition and help others, while maintaining positivity about the future.

See More From the The Path to MPN Empowerment

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Is Laughter Really the Best Medicine? One Woman’s Mission to Help Others with MPNs

Newly Diagnosed with an MPN? Start Here.

A Care Partner’s Journey: How Life Goes on After an MPN Diagnosis

Transcript:

Jeff:

It’s important to educate yourself because the more you know the less fear can overcome you. And this particular disease – the research is happening so fast, and things are changing. In my estimation, they’ll find – right now, the only cure is a stem cell transplant. It’s normally not done for older people. That in itself is innately risky. I’m convinced, probably within the next five to seven years, there will be a cure for this disease that’s not a stem cell transplant.

The research is moving that quickly on it. And if you don’t follow the disease and the people that are working on it, the specialists, you’re gonna have a much greater chance of feeling powerless and getting overwhelmed by it. As Summer believes, attitude can have a huge, huge impact on how the course of your disease runs. And a doctor would tell you the same thing.

For me, it started with Patient Power. Patientpower.info, I believe is, what it is. They have a whole section for myeloproliferative neoplasms and myelofibrosis, and they’re short videos. And you get a chance to listen to the best doctors that are the head people in this, Dr. Mesa, Dr. V [Verstovsek], and Dr. Jamieson – all the people that are really the movers and shakers. They speak. And you also get a chance to hear other patient’s stories and how they’re dealing with it. And that will give you a much better idea of what you’re facing. And you can really understand things from there. And you can get your knowledge.

Fear comes from lack of knowledge. In my job as a pilot, I flew for 50 years. I very, very rarely was afraid because my knowledge was so great and was reinforced every year by continual training that I felt prepared to handle anything that might come across to me. Knowledge is really important. It will allay your fears dramatically.

When I started online and heard about people that had been journeying with this for 10 or 15 years, initially, I had thought – well, this is a year or two, and it’ll be the end. And then I realized, plenty of people have lived with this for a long, long time. And they had a journey, and they’re doing it successfully. And that gave me confidence.

The more people you can talk to about it, the more you can put your journey in perspective. And it’s really hard to put in perspective for this particular disease because it affects everybody vastly differently. Some cancers – the progression is very, very linear. Everybody kind of goes through the same thing. This one – it depends on the mutations you have in your blood and all kinds of things like that, and some people get really bad symptoms quickly.

Others, they don’t. But the more you know about how those things affect you, the more you know and can understand about what to expect. And the more people you talk to who have it, you can find out about their journeys. It helps put yours in perspective.

I’m optimistic because I really keep up to date on what’s going on. And I see the doctors that are in the forefront of this and the research that they’re putting in and the care they have for working on this disease and the knowledge they have, and I just am quite optimistic. And as I say, I’m following the medical developments extremely closely.

I went to the ASH Conference last year. And I’ve gone to another conference that our doctor spoke at. And I’m just kinda blown away by – I’m fascinated by the science.

My advice would be find out as much as you can about it and support each other in a way that works in your own marriage.

Summer and I approach life a little bit differently. And yet, one of the reasons we do so well together is we kinda have both ends of the spectrum covered. And I sensed that when I met her 20 years ago. And we brought something to the table that each of us needed. And if you can find that in your relationship with your significant other that has the disease, what you can bring to it, what they can bring to it, you can be a tremendous support for each other.

A Care Partner’s Journey: How Life Goes on After an MPN Diagnosis

A Care Partner’s Journey: How Life Goes on After an MPN Diagnosis from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Care partner Jeff Bushnell shares how he and his wife, patient advocate Summer Golden, have dealt with her myelofibrosis (MF) diagnosis. Jeff explains how online support and finding an MPN specialist were essential steps in helping them continue to live life to the fullest.

Summer Golden and Jeff Bushnell have been married for over 20 years. When Summer was diagnosed with myelofibrosis (MF), Jeff took on the role of care partner and advocate. Summer uses her years of theatre training and comedy to cope with her condition and help others, while maintaining positivity about the future.

 

See More From the The Path to MPN Empowerment

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Transcript:

Jeff:

The worst part was initially. We didn’t get a myelofibrosis diagnosis.

It took about a month because in order to definitively diagnose it they have to take a bone marrow sample and send it to a pathologist and so on and so forth. So, all that time, I’m worrying about the possibilities. It could be leukemia or this, that, or the other thing. My way of handling and dealing with scariness – I’m a retired pilot – is to find out things, knowledge.

I spent a huge amount of time on the internet. The LLS Society has papers about it, and I read those.

And the more I got into it – once we found out it was myelofibrosis, I’ve read almost all of the papers that the doctors write for each other to find about this. That doesn’t interest Summer in the slightest. It interests me greatly. So, when we have an appointment with the doctor – when I’m talking to the doctor, it’s like two doctors talking to each other.

When Summer’s talking to her, they talk on a different plane. It’s much more about mental approach to things and that kind of thing.

And for me, when I think back to the beginning of when we had this and where we are now two years later, we’re living the life that we lived before she was diagnosed to be real honest with you.

We do everything that we did before she was diagnosed the same way we did it before, and it was a trip that probably everybody who gets diagnosed or deals with a person that has the disease takes. When it first happened, it hit us like bricks coming out of the sky hitting us on the face. Literally, when we first went to the hospital and she got the word that there was a problem – as I say, we lived in two separate houses – I literally was afraid to call her phone figuring she might be not there. I was that scared. And then, after we met our doctor, which was extremely fortuitous – when we went to the emergency room, the person that was there, she said these look like leukemia things.

So, she called the oncologist. The oncologist on call is our current doctor, Dr. Tiffany Tanaka, and she’s a specialist in this disease. It was like it was meant to be. And Dr. Tanaka asked the guy to do some other tests and then said, “Send her home, but tell her I need to see her this week.” So, we’re thinking all these horrible things. And its New Year’s weekend, so the clinic is closed for about five days, you know? We’re worrying and worrying and worrying.

We finally saw Dr. Tanaka, and it was like a breath of fresh air. This wonderful doctor has the ability to just communicate with the patients. I’m interested in the disease, so she communicated on my level. Summer is not interested in all the medical jargon, so she was able to explain to Summer what was going on and just very, very reassuring, very reassuring.

And then, I went and started getting information. That’s my way of coping with things. The first place I went was – I went to Patient Power and found a lot of information there.

And then I found the online myelofibrosis support group at Facebook. And that was very, very useful. When I started reading about the fact that some people had this for many, many years – then I said this is not – nothing’s gonna happen in the next year or two. We can go back to living. And once we learned more about it and spent more time with our doctor and Summer was able to live her life once she got taking the medicine – she takes Jakafi.

That controlled the basic symptoms, and we haven’t looked back. We just started living our life the way we had been living it before.

Is Laughter Really the Best Medicine? One Woman’s Mission to Help Others with MPNs

Is Laughter Really the Best Medicine? One Woman’s Mission to Help Others with MPNs from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Could laugher really be the best medicine? Patient advocate Summer Golden explains how she uses comedy to cope with her myelofibrosis (MF) diagnosis and shares her mission to inspire others.

Summer Golden and Jeff Bushnell have been married for over 20 years. When Summer was diagnosed with myelofibrosis (MF), Jeff took on the role of care partner and advocate. Summer uses her years of theatre training and comedy to cope with her condition and help others, while maintaining positivity about the future.

See More From the The Path to MPN Empowerment

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Am I Meditating Correctly? Getting the Most Out of Mindfulness

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Transcript:

Summer:

When I was initially diagnosed after some other false starts with an MPN, I was kind of shocked because I’ve never really been sick, and I don’t take medications, but I didn’t think about it – that sounds crazy; I can’t explain it. I just figured I’d be okay, and the main thing – I didn’t wanna give up this theater.

You know how when you’re my age, people talk about nothing but their illness sometimes? I just never been into that, so it wasn’t part of my personality.

I started doing comedy two years ago because a friend of mine was taking a comedy class, and I went to her showcase, and I thought, “I should try that, even though I’ll never be funny, I have no jokes, and I don’t know what I would say.” But, I went, and I did comedy in clubs for a while, and then I didn’t – I don’t really like drinking and dirty jokes, so I kind of got away from it off and on, and then, when I got into doing it about my myelofibrosis, then I saw a purpose in it, so I went back to it.

I was thinking about whether my life was gonna be changed, how this was gonna change me, so I emailed my comedy teacher in the middle of the night, and I said, “Do comedians ever talk about cancer, having it?” And, he said, “Only if they have it.” So, I emailed him back and I said, “I’m coming back to your class,” so I did. He assigned everyone to be in a showcase. I was gonna do mine about cancer. It was six weeks, so I had to find humor. I don’t know how I find it. I just kind of see things.

I was shocked because I thought people were gonna hate it, and I was gonna quit, and then I’d invited my doctor and two friends, so I thought I’d better not just not show up. But, people came up and said they were inspired. I was just amazed because I mainly –I don’t go out of my way to think of – I do think of things that are funny, but it’s just – it’s a real thing. I try to keep my comedy real.

It’s helped me by being in control. I don’t pay much attention to the symptoms because I’m kind of over them.

Just helped me feel like I’m doing what I can do, and so far, it seems to be working, as long as I get enough sleep.

How do I think comedy could help other people who have health problems? I can tell you one way I thought to help somebody. I wanna start a class for people, but so far, there hasn’t been a lot of interest, but I think I could really help people doing that because I know how to write comedy.

If they really wanna do that, they would be a type of person that has humor, and they could do it, but you’ve gotta realize sometimes, people get a lot out of being sick. There are a lot of rewards, and so, they might prefer to have those rewards. For my way of thinking, if they wanna do humor, it’ll make a big difference, and if somebody wants to do it, they could call me, and I’ll help them.