Entries by Casey Quinlan

Checklists Aren’t Just For Clinicians

Checklists – lists of requirements for completing tasks without errors or omissions – are common in many industries. Aviation, software engineering, litigation, manufacturing all rely on the use of checklists to accomplish their objectives – no crashes, no bugs, no missing evidence, no missing parts. When Atul Gawande’s bestselling book “The Checklist Manifesto” landed in […]

Surprise Billing, Cancer, and You

One of the most nagging issues patients face in the American healthcare system is the risk of what are called “surprise bills,” billing for procedures or treatments that are provided by out-of-network physicians or facilities. While most of the headlines about surprise billing have focused on emergency treatment, there are also cases where treatment for […]

Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare

Ready for its closeup, or not ready for primetime? Headlines about the advent of artificial intelligence, AI, in pretty much every sector of human life or enterprise seem to be a daily occurrence. Other phrases that get thrown around in stories about AI are machine learning, deep learning, neural networks, and natural language processing. Here’s […]

All I Want for Christmas … Is a Better Scientific Publishing Model

Scientific publishing is broken. That may sound like hyperbole, but it’s not – there’s a rising tide of voices, in academic and policy circles, as well as from the general public, calling for change in how science is reported professionally. The traditional scientific publishing model – the one that’s rooted in “publish or perish” – […]

Cyber Hygiene – Peer Support in the Age of Surveillance Capitalism

Unless you’re a visitor from another planet, you’ve probably seen or heard some news about the internet being a giant privacy sinkhole. Between the stories that first started to break in the Cambridge Analytica/Brexit aftermath, and the ongoing drip-drip-drip that is the “my phone is a snitch” stuff that seems to bring fresh scary headlines […]

Science and Evidence That’s Readable By Average Folks? It Does Exist!

There’s a lot of discussion – online, at conferences, and in clinical care settings – about “evidence-based medicine.” There is some disagreement (no surprise) on the idea that any medicine is done-and-dusted on the science and evidence front, since science itself is a process of ongoing discovery. And even those discoveries can get called into […]

Care Coordination in Cancer – Are We There Yet?

Care coordination [1] in medicine is a gold standard goal – it’s a core part of quality improvement efforts across the healthcare system. But, in the words of every kid in the back seat of a car on a family road trip, “are we there yet?” The answer is, “no, but we’re getting closer.” The US […]

Bias in Medicine – An Untreated Epidemic

Bias – noun – prejudice in favor of or against one thing, person, or group compared with another, usually in a way considered to be unfair. Humans are, by nature, biased in favor of their own group – village, country, race, social status – over “others” from outside that group. This tendency toward bias against […]

Access To Healthcare As A Human Right

One of the keys to health literacy is understanding your role, as a patient, in the care delivery process chain: learning what you need to know to ask questions that can help clarify decisions with your clinical team; how to assess the information you’re given to understand what you need to do, or to consider, […]

Peer to Peer Health Networks, Trust … and Facebook

Unless you’ve been visiting another planet lately, you’ve probably seen a headline or two (or maybe fifty) about the rising sense that the social network called Facebook might not be trustworthy when it comes to data privacy for the network’s users. Not that the barrage of headlines over the last year have been the first […]

Health Literacy + Clinical Trials = Your Mileage May Vary

I spent Thursday, April 11, 2019 at a National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine (NASEM) workshop titled “Health Literacy in Clinical Trials: Practice and Impact” – this meeting is part of the NASEM’s ongoing Roundtable on Health Literacy. I got an invite due to a tipoff from #BSCM co-founder (and one of my besties) […]

“The Future Is Here, It’s Just Not Evenly Distributed.”

Too often, healthcare outcomes on the ground level feel like a roll of the dice – there seems to be very little certainty about what’s going to happen, despite clinicians’ efforts to explain treatment options and patients’ attempts to understand what’s happening in the treatment process. The endless drumbeat of “scientific breakthrough” headlines of varying […]

A Warrior’s Perspective on Cancer

First, full disclosure: I’m not a member of the armed forces. I am a member of a multi-generation career military family, though, so my syntax is flavored with warrior-isms, from throw-weight to battle-ready. I’ll ask you this: are you battle-ready for an engagement with cancer? I can say that I was not fully prepared for […]

Finding the Funny When the Diagnosis Isn’t

It’s not easy hearing your name and [insert dread diagnosis here]. I know this only too well after having to find the funny in my own journey through cancer. Cancer is, however, most often a diagnosis that you fight to a defined end. What’s it like to find the funny in a chronic condition like […]

All I Want For Christmas Is Customer Service at My Doctor’s Office

I have this crazy dream. It’s about how, when I make an appointment to see my doctor – my primary care physician, my radiologist, my orthopedist, my whatever-ologist – the process is easy, honors my time as much as it does my doctor’s, and winds up running smoothly for both sides of the transaction. The […]