Relapsed and Refractory Multiple Myeloma: What’s the Difference?

Relapsed and Refractory Multiple Myeloma: What’s the Difference? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Dr. Peter Forsberg defines relapsed and refractory myeloma, terms often used when discussing myeloma, but not always explained.

Dr. Peter Forsberg is assistant professor of medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and is a specialist in multiple myeloma. More about Dr. Forsberg here.

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Transcript:

So, I think that in differentiating relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma, they sometimes get lumped together and you might say relapsed and refractory myeloma. And that’s partly because that’s groups of patients who are included in the same clinical trials or different things like that.  But they are different things. A patient who is relapsed may have been off treatment for a substantial amount of time before they relapsed. A patient with refractory multiple myeloma, they may be refractory to just one type of medicine.

You may be refractory just to lenalidomide if you’re myeloma progressed or relapsed while you were taking it, or it may mean that you have not responded very substantially to any of the medicines you have received so far. So, there are different categories even within refractory myeloma. Whether it’s just to one or multiple different medicines, or if it’s more broad where we’re having a hard time getting a response with even different combinations.