March 2022 Digital Health Round Up

March 2022 Digital Health Round Up

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Cancer screening is the best tool available in the fight against cancer. Thanks to technological advances, one company is using artificial intelligence to transform the future of cervical cancer screening. Rush Hospital in Chicago is also using an artificial intelligence system to improve colon cancer screening. Both cervical and colon cancer often do not present with symptoms in early stages, so screening is important. A company in Madison is using digital technology to analyze tumor biopsies, in turn allowing for more effective treatment options for providers and patients.

AI Transforms Cervical Cancer Screening

Health experts said the new technology could be instrumental in ensuring earlier detection of pre-cancerous cells and cancer cells and has the potential to save lives, reports Newschainonline.com . A hospital in the UK is piloting the technology using artificial intelligence that takes digital cytology images from cervical smear samples that test positive for HPV (human papillomavirus). The AI sorts through all the cell images and pulls out the images of abnormalities. The expert providers use these images to detect pre-cancerous and cancerous cells, allowing for earlier diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Find more information here.

Rush Deploys AI System for Colon Cancer Screening

The Medtronic GI Genius intelligent endoscopy system can help increase the ability to locate multiple polyps during a colonoscopy by 50 percent, resulting in enhanced diagnosis and treatment of digestive diseases, reports healthitanalytics.com . This Artificial Intelligence helps physicians find polyps that the naked eye cannot see, therefore catching the polyps before cancer can develop. Colon cancer is the second deadliest cancer. Rush Hospital in Chicago, Illinois is using the technology during their colonoscopies. Find more information here.

Madison Company Testing New Technology in Cancer Diagnosis

With three-dimensional imaging licensed from the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, based on work from the lab of UW-Madison biomedical engineering professor Kevin Eliceiri, Elephas Biosciences can analyze live tumor samples to see how well they respond to therapies, reports Madison.com . This can help diagnose all types of cancer with solid tumors. These live tissue samples from the biopsies can be tested with different treatments to see which is most effective. Physicians can try the treatment on the tumor before using it on the patient; this could eliminate blind testing and provide better outcomes with less side effects for patients. Find more information here.