Is Stem Cell Transplantation Still a Treatment Option for Some DLBCL Patients

Is Stem Cell Transplantation Still a Treatment Option for Some DLBCL Patients

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Is Stem Cell Transplantation Still a Treatment Option for Some DLBCL Patients? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Can diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients expect to undergo stem cell transplant? Expert Dr. Nirav Shah from the Medical College of Wisconsin explains some alternatives to stem cell transplant in specific situations and shares his perspective about how the use of stem cell transplants may evolve in the future. 

Dr. Nirav Shah is an Associate Professor at the Medical College of Wisconsin. Learn more about Dr. Shah.

[ACT]IVATION TIP:

“…don’t discard transplantation because it’s an older therapy, it’s just one that needs to be used in the right scenario for each patient.”

See More from [ACT]IVATED DLBCL

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What Promising Treatments Are Available for Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Patients

When Should CAR-T Therapy Be Considered for Relapsed_Refractory DLBCL Patients

When Should CAR-T Therapy Be Considered for Relapsed/Refractory DLBCL Patients

How Can Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Treatment Symptoms Be Managed

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Transcript:

Lisa Hatfield:  

So in light of all of these newer therapies, there’s still a place for stem cell transplantation with the DLBCL patients? 

Dr. Nirav N. Shah:

Yeah, great question. So the goal is always to do better. And so we have this new exciting therapy called CAR T, that for a lot of patients is going to replace the role of the stem cell transplant. However, there still is a role for transplant in patients that have later relapse, so those patients who relapse one to two years, transplant is still a standard of care and an option that I would consider for my patients, and there’s more than one type of stem cell transplant out there. So we often think about autologous transplants in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, where we use our own immune system to rebuild it after giving a high intensity chemotherapy treatment to eliminate the cancer. But there’s a second type of transplant called allogeneic stem cell transplant, and that is where we actually replace your whole immune system with one from a healthy donor.

Our group, actually, for patients that fail CAR T-cell therapy, which is one of our better treatment options that we have, but again, not 100 percent effective, we’ve used allogeneic stem cell transplant to try and cure those patients and offer them something where we replace their immune system with one from a healthy donor to be able to get rid of the cancer where other treatments have failed.

So I think that how we use transplant is going to be redefined with newer therapies and immune therapies like CAR , immune T or bispecific antibodies. But I do think that either auto or allogeneic transplant is still going to be part of the treatment algorithms, especially for those patients who have failed other options. So my activation point is don’t discard transplantation because it’s an older therapy, it’s just one that needs to be used in the right scenario for each patient. 


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