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Support For Those With Lung Cancer

This resource was originally published by Cancer Care.org here.

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Counseling

Oncology social workers help you cope with the emotional and practical challenges of lung cancer. Contact us at 800‑813‑HOPE (4673) or info@cancercare.org.
Learn more about counseling.

CancerCare has partnered with LUNGevity, the nation’s leading lung cancer-focused nonprofit organization to provide the LUNGevity Lung Cancer Helpline: 844-360-LUNG (5864).

Financial Assistance

Find resources and support to manage your financial concerns. Limited assistance from CancerCare® is available to eligible families for cancer-related costs.

Support Groups

Connect with others in our free support groups led by oncology social workers.

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Community Programs

If you live in New York, New Jersey, or Connecticut, learn about and view the full calendar of our free community programs.

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Ask CancerCare

Every month, featured experts answer your questions about coping with cancer. View all questions and answers.

LUNG CANCER
  • Q.

    My 68-year-old husband was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2004, had radiation and chemo, and is currently in remission. Since ending his treatment, his personality has changed drastically and he directs his anger towards me. Can chemo affect a person mentally?

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  • Q.

    My husband has just been diagnosed with small cell lung cancer with small tumors in his liver. He starts chemo next week with 4 hours, day 1 and 2 hours, day 2 and 3. He repeats this every 18 days for six sessions. Is this the normal treatment for small cell lung cancer? Where would I look to find information on clinical trials?

    More…

  • Q.

    How can I breathe with a lung after the pneumonectomy? Is there anything I should be doing?

    More…

  • Q.

    My sister has stage 4 non-small cell lung cancer as well as tumors in her liver. Are there two different chemotherapy treatments for both the lung and the liver or are they treated with the same drugs?

    More…

  • Q.

    My best friend’s husband has just started chemo for lung cancer but refuses to quit smoking. This is driving a huge wedge between the two of them. Does smoking impact the effectiveness of the chemo?

    More…

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Stories of Help and Hope

Read inspiring personal accounts from people affected by cancer and the ways they’ve found to cope.

The Emotional Side of Cancer

The Emotional Side of Cancer from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Founder and CEO of CanSurround, Meg Maley, alongside a panel of Niki Koesel. MSN, ANP, ACHPN, FPCN, Eric Roeland, MD, and lung cancer survivor Randy Broad discuss the emotional side of cancer and how symptom and comfort management should be apart of your treatment from the beginning.

Communicating With Your Healthcare Team

Communicating With Your Healthcare Team from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Founder and CEO of CanSurround, Meg Maley, alongside a panel of Niki Koesel. MSN, ANP, ACHPN, FPCN, Eric Roeland, MD, and lung cancer survivor Randy Broad discuss the importance of communicating with your healthcare team. They agree in having a life planning conversation while you’re healthy is one of the best things you can do.

The Conversation: Supportive Care for Lung Cancer Patients

Meg Maley, RN, BSN, hosts a panel discussion around the topic of supportive care for lung cancer patients. Dr. Eric Roeland, Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine at UC San Diego, Niki Koesel, MSN, ANP, ACHPN, FPCN, Director of Palliative Care, Carolinas Healthcare System, Levine Cancer Institute, and Randy Broad, a 7-year lung cancer patient, join in the discussion.

The participants discuss supportive vs. palliative care, explaining that palliative care is actually an additional layer of support for patients and families. Discussing palliative care at the time of diagnosis will help the patient learn about all options and will lead to the best quality of life for cancer patients.

The Conversation then turns to the healing vs. curing debate. Niki and Randy both agree that healing is individual and depends greatly on the patient’s situation and perspective.

The panel then discusses the patient experience during treatment for lung cancer, and the challenges involved. Discernible challenges for patients going through treatment, especially chemotherapy, are the fear of hair loss and the onset of nausea.

Niki then talks about cachexia: what it is, and how it can be treated. She further explains how cachexia can be a heavy burden for patients and caregivers, and references several treatment options such as medications, energy conservation therapy, and cognitive behavioral therapy.

The Conversation concludes with all participants agreeing on the importance of communication and shared decision-making with the medical team.

Watch and listen as these esteemed participants discuss topical issues in Supportive Care for Lung Cancer Patients.

The Conversation: Supportive Care for Lung Cancer Patients from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.