Dr. Krina Patel: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Krina Patel: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Why is it important to empower patients in their care? Expert Dr. Krina Patel from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center discusses her approaches and how she engages with her patients through treatment, care, and survivorship.

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Dr. Joshua Sabari: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Samuel Cykert: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Samuel Cykert: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Eugene Manley: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Eugene Manley: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients? 

Transcript:

Dr. Krina Patel:

So I think in myeloma, where our patients for the most part are not cured, they’re incurable and for the most part are on therapy lifelong. I think it’s really important that they have a community to go to, including their caregivers. There’s a lot of caregiver burnout that happens, patients, when they’re doing well or well, but when they relapse, it can be pretty dramatic and kind of take away everything again. And every time a patient’s relapsing, sometimes it feels hopeless.

And I think with all the therapies we have out there, this embarrassment of riches as we myeloma doctors like to say, we have to be able to get them through to have access to these drugs at the right time, make sure we decrease toxicity. But it’s a lot of information.

And I think for our patients, no matter how much time we spend with them, it’s just, it’s overwhelming. And I think it is for a lot of my colleagues who don’t just do myeloma all the time. I mean, it’s overwhelming for me half the time when I’m trying to see my patients and figuring out which is the next therapy. And so I really, at the first visit, talk to my patients about patient advocacy groups that are out there. And I even give them websites to go to.

At MD Anderson we’re trying to make videos for our patients so that while they’re waiting in the waiting rooms, they’ll have access to those, specifically, for CAR-T therapy and bispecifics. I think those are such great novel therapies, but they’re also high maintenance as I like to call them that there’s a lot of supportive care that’s needed for infection prophylaxis to make sure they don’t get secondary cancers, right?

All these complications that can happen, neurotoxicity, etcetera. And thankfully, for the most part, our patients do really well and they can get through it. But for those patients who end up with that, it’s really important they have this information, so they know when to contact us. And I think for my colleagues as well, we’re trying really hard to make sure we have better communication, for my patients that are in the community coming in for CAR T or for bispecific therapy, then going back to their doctors, their community doctors for the rest of their care.

So we have letters, that we come up with that we give to the patient as well as send to their doctor. We have phone numbers they can call that even if they’re back home, and they need to get ahold of someone that, they have a lifeline to say, I don’t know what to do. This is happening. And I think, it’s really important again for the patients and their caregivers to really understand, this is a lifelong journey, right?

This is not something that you’re just going to get a few cycles of treatment and then you go to survivorship clinic. And then hopefully we never have to treat again. And that this myeloma as of right now is still a continuous therapy and it could be, long periods of time between therapies. Or you might go on maintenance, for a long period of time before you need your next line of therapy, but this is a lifelong therapy that we’re going to have to do with, with everybody involved.

And I think, again, I can’t see every patient out there and most myeloma specialists can’t, but we’re happy to be a part of the team. And so really, when we can have access to things that the community might not, or be able to help in terms of, what combination is the best for this patient, and what dose reductions should we do for this specific patient?

Those are the things we would love to help our community doctors with to make sure outcomes for all our patients, those who are near us, but those who are also physically not close to us that we can still be able to help to make sure that they have the best efficacy, but also the best quality of life with this disease.

Dr. Eugene Manley: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Eugene Manley: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Drawing from his experiences interacting with patients, survivors, and caregivers, Dr. Eugene Manley emphasizes the significance of providers meeting patients “where they are” emotionally, mentally, and logistically.

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Dr. Joshua Sabari: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Samuel Cykert: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Samuel Cykert: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Charlotte Gamble: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients

Dr. Charlotte Gamble: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients? 

Transcript:

Dr. Eugene Manley:

So, you know, I talk to patients here and there and I’ve talked to survivors and I talk to caregivers of families, of people that have had family members that have, unfortunately, passed away from lung cancer. And the key thing they always say is they, you have to meet people one where they are and not where you want them to be.

So that means you have to really listen to what they need and say break down the jargon, be comfortable, ask, answering the questions because the patients don’t know any of this stuff when they go in. And pretty much when you are hit with a cancer diagnosis, there are 10 other thoughts going through your mind beyond just the cancer. 

Like, how am I going to pay for rent, food? Can I tell my family? Do I…will I lose my job? Will I lose my insurance? There are many, many other thoughts, and then it’s like, well, how much time do I have left? And then that’s where you even start thinking about, okay, what are my options? So you have to really walk with them.

I think a key part in this that we often don’t have are those nurse navigators are really, really key in this stage is they help really translate and walk the patient from dealing with the clinician into all the stuff that’s going to be going downstream. So just really, really critical to listen to the patients and try to have that ear and really think what’s in their best interest and not dismiss them.

Dr. Joshua Sabari: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Joshua Sabari: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Dr. Joshua Sabari emphasizes the importance of active listening and non-judgmental communication in patient care. Dr. Sabari shares how allowing patients to express themselves fully and addressing all their concerns without interruption fosters trust and empowerment.

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Dr. Eugene Manley: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

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Dr. Samuel Cykert: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Charlotte Gamble: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients

Dr. Charlotte Gamble: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients? 

Transcript:

Dr. Joshua Sabari:

I think the key thing to empower patients is to listen and not to judge. The second a patient feels that you are cutting them off, you are judging them, they’re going to shut down. Family members shut down. Allowing patients to express themselves, to explain what the questions they have, never leave a visit when your patient has not finished their questions.

And I know that sounds silly, but you’d be surprised how many physicians walk out of office visits when patients still have many questions. That’s our job, that’s our role. You can set up another visit, you can set up a video visit, but make sure that you allow patients to ask their questions in an open manner, in a non-judgmental manner. Even myself, we all have biases. I find myself changing my facial sort of nuances when I think a patient is asking a silly question.

So understanding those biases that we all have and again, being open, sort of being sort of willing to hear and listen to our patients is critical. We’re not the person diagnosed with the lung cancer. It’s the patient there in front of us, the family members. I think being open, being able to listen broadly to patients’ concerns, even if they’re not in line with our concerns, I think is critical. Any point at which you shut down that conversation that may close that patient relationship down, that may close some of those questions that may have been critical for patients.

So, one thing that I always end our visits with is an open, this is an open discussion. This is how you contact me, this is how you contact our team. We are here for you. We are service providers to you. And I think that in itself having this sort of motivational but also open dialogue is going to empower your patients, not only to ask questions and the right questions, but to allow them to tell you when they’re not feeling well, when something is going wrong.

Dr. Samuel Cykert: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Samuel Cykert: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Why is it important to empower patients? Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) expert Dr. Samuel Cykert from UNC School of Medicine discusses the Greensboro Health Disparities Collaborative and ways that he works to empower his patients.

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Dr. Charlotte Gamble: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients

Dr. Sikander Ailawadhi: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Sikander Ailawadhi: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients? 

Dr. Sara Taveras Alam: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Sara Taveras Alam: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Transcript:

Dr. Samuel Cykert: Yeah, I think the most important thing in empowering patients is communication. First of all, on the explanation side, you have to communicate to the patient that I’m talking to you in normal English that you can understand. I’m not using medicalese to make it impossible for you to understand, so I’m communicating in a way where I’m making it digestible, and then the other thing I always do is I use a teach-back and I ask the patient to tell me what they’ve heard, I want to make sure that the patient can translate back to me the kinds of things that I’ve been saying, but even on top of that, I try to always talk to patients about their families and how their families are fitting in because family is so important in the decision-making process, and even having a family member at the discussion who’s supportive of treatment and care, I think can be another important factor. And I want to communicate that I’m listening, I want the patient’s questions, I want to encourage him or her to ask questions, so that this decision is shared.

Yeah, the only important thing is I did mention the Greensboro Health Disparities Collaborative, which is a community group, some of whom have experienced cancer, some of whom are teachers and UPS drivers, some of whom are healthcare professionals, and there are also patients of color and white individuals and it’s a group where the feedback, particularly in the context of a racial equity training, where everybody’s speaking the same language, their feedback on designing the interventions of the studies we’ve done, the feedback was crucial, and it was a matter of, we heard them, we heard the principles that they wanted to establish, and then we took those principles and used our expertise to translate them into the healthcare system, into the cancer care system. So I just want to say that talking to the community, particularly the community that experiences barriers, really important.

Dr. Charlotte Gamble: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Charlotte Gamble: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Why is it important to empower patients? Expert Dr. Charlotte Gamble from MedStar Health discusses the benefits of patient empowerment and methods she uses to help build trust and to empower her patients.

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Dr. Craig Cole: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Craig Cole: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Transcript:

Dr. Charlotte Gamble:

Yeah, this is such a good question and like actually, goes to the reason why I chose to have a career in medicine and like why I’m doing this. I think that it’s really important to understand that patients are their own individuals and not the tumor, they’re the cancer that they have, that they have whole lives and are whole people before they walk into our clinic doors. And to understand that there is a whole life that they have had and will continue to have alongside a cancer diagnosis.

And so one of the things that I think is so important is when I talk to patients to really understand the condition of their lives, to understand how long it took them to get to my office, to understand who is with them or who is not with them in the room to understand what their fears are, what experiences have they had with the healthcare system prior to meeting me.

How do I regain trust or earn trust, in the context of a healthcare system and a, you know, political system that is, pretty fraught. And I think being able to listen, is one of the greatest skills that I’ve been taught and have really tried to work on. And listening in and of itself I think helps to empower patients because they find their voice because either the doctor listening to them and asking them to tell me what’s happening.

And so the mere act of me listening, this is something that doctors need to do, that helps I think, patients find their voice. I think what I had mentioned previously also was making sure that they have people in their lives that are aware of what’s happening in terms of their cancer diagnosis and treatment plan that can be a support to patients.

I think getting these diagnoses can be traumatizing and recognizing the trauma that having a cancer diagnosis, can have, and the ripple effect that it has on not only the patients, but those that surround them is really important to recognize the gravity of that. And that while I might be seeing 20, 25 patients with cancer in my clinic or operating on three to four patients in a day, these are, really seminal moments in a person’s life. And recognizing the gravity and the responsibility that I have as their provider to not only listen to them, but make sure that they are surrounded by love and compassion, by people in their lives. And making sure that they feel that they have the language to share their diagnosis with their loved ones and to bring their loved ones on for the ride, is really important. So, I don’t know. I listen. I try to make sure that they’ve got folks that are there and present. And, I think that that’s really kind of how I try to center patients in this whole cancer care process.

Dr. Sikander Ailawadhi: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Sikander Ailawadhi: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

How can healthcare providers empower patients? Expert Dr. Sikander Ailawadhi from the Mayo Clinic explains the mindset and approach he takes to patient empowerment and questions that he asks patients to put them in better control of their care.

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Dr. Craig Cole: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Transcript:

Dr. Sikander Ailawadhi: 

Patient empowerment is an extremely important aspect of how we deliver healthcare and how our patients consume healthcare. Let’s take a step back and think about it this way. A patient was diagnosed with cancer. This is not what they were expecting. This is not what their families, their loved ones, anybody was expecting. It throws a wrench in their life plans, and suddenly they have lost control, not over their health, in a lot of cases, even over their lives, over their families, their jobs, everything. What can we do to empower our patients and make them feel in control?

A statement that is very frequently used by a lot of people, frankly, is, well, the patients need to be their own advocates. Yeah, but I really strongly feel if a patient does not even know what to ask, how are they going to ask the right question? How do they know what is the right question to even put up to the clinician? So in my opinion, the biggest thing, in fact, in some ways, even the least thing I can do to empower my patients is to educate them, is to make them aware about the disease, about the treatment, both the benefits and the side effects, about long-term outcomes.

I do offer to my patients, for example, “Are you interested in knowing about prognosis?” Some patients don’t want to hear about it, but some were afraid to ask. If they know what they have to expect, they are able to plan better. They are able to get in control better. So for me, the number one way of empowering the patient is spending time with them, educating them, making them aware about their disease, about their treatment, and about the long-term expectations of living their life after the cancer diagnosis.

Dr. Sara Taveras Alam: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Sara Taveras Alam: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

How do care providers empower patients, and why is it important? Acute myeloid leukemia expert Dr. Sara Taveras Alam from UT Health Houston shares various methods she employs to empower patients in their care, cancer journeys, and ultimate decisions about the way they want to live with cancer.

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Dr. Craig Cole: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Craig Cole: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Transcript:

Dr. Sara Taveras Alam:

I empower my patients by explaining their disease at an elementary grade level, educating them on what to expect with treatments and keeping open lines of communication with them. I encourage my patients to share their journey with those who are close to them and to accept help. An extra set of ears may be helpful to recall conversations with physicians, and writing down questions in between visits can make sure that questions don’t go unanswered. I provide my patients with educational resources on their disease and do my best to explain the nuances of their treatment and what life with AML looks like.

I empower them to be their best advocate and ensure they know that they are the decision makers in this process, and we are here to guide and support them. Ultimately, it is their life, and they get to choose what is important to them. We should accommodate as best as we can. And sometimes that may be allowing them to postpone their next chemo cycle for a few days for a meaningful life event. 

When things are rough, I empower patients by acknowledging their hardship and keeping alive the hope of cure unless that is no longer feasible. In the circumstances when controlling the disease is no longer feasible, I make every effort to accompany the patient in their concession of end of life care where there are no doubts about stones unturned, there is quality time with their loved ones, and there is peace of a life well-lived.

Dr. Emily Hinchcliff: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Emily Hinchcliff: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

How can patients be empowered? Gynecological oncologist  Dr. Emily Hinchcliff from Northwestern Medicine shares the approaches she uses in her practice to help empower patients in their journey through care.

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Dr. Craig Cole: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Transcript:

Dr. Emily Hinchcliff:  

So I empower my patients through education. I think that we as physicians, as providers, serve a really key role for patients in terms of serving as medical translators, in terms of helping our patients to ensure they understand the diagnoses that are facing them and their treatment options kind of for what the next steps in their care are.

So as a GYN oncologist, I really kind of weave that through my entire practice and every step of the way, I have the great privilege of caring for my patients from their diagnosis throughout their cancer journey. And so every step of the way, ensuring that they are educated about their disease and educated about their options, I think really allows us to build a powerful partnership and gives them the kind of ownership over their own cancer care.

Charise Gleason: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Charise Gleason: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

How can patients and families be empowered? Advanced practice professional Charise Gleason from Winship Cancer Institute discusses her perspective and communication methods that have shown benefits for her myeloma patients.

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Dr. Craig Cole: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Transcript:

Charise Gleason:

I think it’s important to empower our patients, and we do that from day one. Patient comes to us, we’re starting to develop that relationship. And the discussions that we have early on can be very different from later, but we have to continually reinforce, ask questions, give patients the opportunity to ask us questions. I know when I talk to a patient about a clinical trial, and I’m documenting, I put that back in, patient or family member or care partner was given the opportunity to ask questions.

Our clinics go very quickly, and you have to make the time for your patients. So you have that relationship, and they know that they can bring issues to you. Sometimes we don’t get it right either, and you’ve got to own that and move on to that next step. So you continue that relationship. Patients are going through losing control with having a cancer, and like myeloma and many times patients never even heard of multiple myeloma until they come into our world.

So it is an ongoing open communication, and we don’t make decisions for them. We give them options and upfront or early relapse, you may have far more options than you do in that relapsed/refractory setting. But you’ve got to know what’s important to your patient and what their goals are. And, are they still working? Our patients vary in age. But you want to think about where your patient is, what’s important to them, and you don’t know that unless you ask the questions and have that communication. Our patients are very savvy. We go to meetings. The first thing they want to know is what did you learn? Even when they’re doing well on their current treatment, they want to know what’s next. What’s out there for me if this stops working?

 When we’re in that biochemical relapse phase where we don’t have to change treatment, we’re already having those conversations about what are those options next for you? And so I think that having that team approach, that open communication is really important for our patients and empowers them to make good decisions. As an advanced practice provider, it’s important for me to explain my role, right?

Patients will come to a practice, and sometimes they’re surprised that I don’t see the physician every time I come. So I think it’s instead of ignoring that and not telling patients, I think it’s important that we describe our roles in that care as well. That, yes, I also specialize in multiple myeloma. I collaborate with your physician. We talk about you, even if you’re not seeing your physician. And so I think that patient and family understanding the rest of the team and what we bring to the table for them is essential as well. 

Dr. Craig Cole: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Craig Cole: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

How can patients and families be empowered? Expert Dr. Craig Cole from Karmanos Cancer Institute discusses methods of empowering patients in their care and the benefits of patient empowerment.

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Charise Gleason: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients

Charise Gleason: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients? 

Transcript:

Dr. Craig Cole:

Well I think I’ll start with the why that’s important first. It is not only good patient care. I mean, it’s good patient care to have your patients empowered, that you’re not making decisions for them, but you have shared decision-making and work as a team. And so that’s, I think the biggest thing is it really is good patient care. It enhances compliance, it enhances the patient experience, the provider experience to have empowered patients.

The other thing is that it makes your job fun to have empowered patients. For me to walk into a room and a patient just says, “Well, I’m okay,” is one thing to have a patient, for me to walk in a room and say, “Well, I’m okay. So what’s new in myeloma?” And then being able to talk about that, because I can’t talk about this new myeloma at home anymore. I mean, my wife and kids are sick of hearing about myeloma. So who do I have to talk to? I have patients to talk to. And you can’t talk to unempowered patients. You have to talk to empowered patients. So it just makes your job fun to have an empowered patient. So, how do you do that?

 And again, it’s good patient care. So how do you do that? Is that you start on day one and giving data to patients so that they see giving their data so that my patients go home with their bone marrow biopsy. They go home with their cytogenetic data. They go home with the data that they have so that they see that what happens in the clinic, what happens at home, that it’s not black and white, but there’s a continuum there, that they’re empowered and they have the data in front of them to see that this is really happening.

The second thing is offering options to patients that patients understand that is just not, a four drug therapy or two or one drug therapy, but there are options for therapy and that you can pick the best option for you as we go through sort of the risks and benefits. So I’ve been criticized by offering too many options to my patients, and I think that’s impossible to, that you can’t offer too many options because I don’t live in my patients’ shoes.

They’re the best ones to say, do I want to be here once a week, every week, for an hour or don’t want to be here once a week for two hours, three weeks out of four weeks, or do I want to not come in at all and get an oral therapy and they’re the best judge for that. So we offer things, including offering clinical trial space. So offering options gets them involved in the process, so they’re part of the empowerment.

Also referring them to educational resources. We have fantastic support groups and patient advocacy organizations here and around the world, and they’re very, very helpful. And when you see other empowered patients, it’s hard to not be empowered yourself when you see all the great opportunity. We also make sure the patient uses their portal so that if they have a question that they can communicate directly to me, they don’t have to wait a month in order to, it is very un-empowering to sit there with a rash for two weeks, as opposed to just, sending me a message to the portal. And probably most importantly, I think, is really listening and validating patients’ concerns.

There was a study that was done by the Cancer Support Community and their Patient Experience Survey, and that a lot of patients, over 50 percent of patients, don’t discuss financial toxicity, don’t discuss their behavioral health concerns, such as depression, because they think that the doctor can’t or the providers can’t do anything about it. And part of that is that if someone says, “Well, it’s kind of expensive for my drug,” and you don’t validate and listen to that, then they’re going to drop it and they may never bring it up again. Or if they say, “I’m having trouble with sleep and engaging other people,” basically saying that they have depression, if you don’t validate and listen to that, then they may never bring it up again, and they’re going to suffer with that along with their myeloma. So it’s really important as an empowering thing for patients for you to listen and validate what patients have and their concerns. 

Dr. Jun Gong: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Jun Gong: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo

Why is it important to empower patients? Expert Dr. Jun Gong from Cedar-Sinai Medical Center shares his perspective on how empowering patients impacts them and specific ways he improves his gastric patient care.

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Dr. Isaac Powell: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Transcript:

Dr. Jun Gong: 

So empowering patients is very important because we can only do so much from our side in terms of we have treatments to offer, we have prescriptions to provide, we have diagnostics we can do to work up certain maladies and illnesses. However, I think what we don’t grasp is how much happens at home. The majority of the time is the patient at home with their caregiver, with their family members? And here, I think it’s a very important pillar of treatment where not only is one pillar just from the oncologist side and from the doctor’s and all the healthcare providers’ side, the other pillar is what happens at home.

And this is where I think empowering patients is very important. This is where empowering them to control what foods they eat, what foods have been known to be risk factors for stomach cancer or any kind of cancer.

What foods to focus on, to building nutrition, to be able to tolerate chemotherapy or cancer treatment, to be able to boost your immune system. These are important aspects that are controlled really at the patient level and the family level. The other way to empower patients is activity. We often say it that, mother knows best. If you don’t use it, you’re going to lose it. And so debilitation is a big problem in our cancer patients as well.

So ways to promote activity, whether it’s just a walk, a daily walk outside the neighborhood, or even to more strenuous types of cardiac exercises. And here we actually have newer resources available in our physical rehab colleagues. Our cancer nutritionists are excellent resources as well. And these are just aspects of empowering patients on what they can do at home. Because I often find patients and family members ask, what else could we be doing beyond what we are prescribing in the clinic and what we’re doing in the hospital or the medical care setting?

The other aspect is to empower patients to know that it is appropriate, always appropriate to seek more than another opinion on your treatment plan. And we have a really, really close relationship from both the academic to the community level where we’re more than happy to review clinical trials, provide second opinions. Here is a very important part that we recognize that we are not here to, let’s just say, have patients stay with us for treatment. We envision a relationship where if a trial is not available, our recommendations should be to deliver these recommendations to the community provider so that they can provide day-to-day care because their care is just as excellent and they have just the same access to standard of care. We are here for a mutual relationship and partnership. It is not a one-way street, and it’s not definitely a black hole where if you refer patients to a larger academic center, are you worried that you won’t hear from the patient or from the provider? We always make it a close goal to have timely feedback to our referring partners. And this is just some of the few ways that I believe it’s important to empower your patients.

Dr. Beth Faiman: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Beth Faiman: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

How can patients be empowered, and why is it an important part of their care? Dr. Beth Faiman from Taussig Cancer Institute shares three key elements that comprise her view of patient empowerment.

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RuthAnn Gordon: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Beth Sandy: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Isaac Powell: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Isaac Powell: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Transcript:

Dr. Faiman:

I think as an advanced practice provider, I consider about three key elements of patient empowerment to include information, access, and engagement. So those three things really resonate with me through shared decision-making. So first of all, the patients need to possess the knowledge that they need to make informed decisions about their health? What is their health status remission? What are their future therapeutic options? Are there clinical trials available? And what’s the best treatment for them? 

And I share this information with the caregiver and the patient as well. Access is also an important role, and important thing for a patient, access to medications. Sometimes there’s co-pay assistance that we need to gain as nurses, advanced practice providers, and physicians to get patients what they need whether it’s a pill or a shot. And then finally, I did mention that shared decision-making process. And that’s where the patients are really engaged.

So I like to mutually share information between the patient caregiver and the clinical team, so we’re sharing information back and forth. We can identify what their goals of care are, and we can make decisions about their health that lessen the risk of decisional regret. Again, make them feel comfortable about the decisions they’re making. And so by these little strategies, I really thinking empowering the patients to take hold of their own health is a way that we can all mutually feel successful in their care.

RuthAnn Gordon: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

RuthAnn Gordon: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

How can patients be empowered, and why is it an important part of their care? Director of Clinical Trials Nursing RuthAnn Gordon from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center shares her expert perspective.

See More from Empowering Providers to Empower Patients (EPEP)

Related Resources:

Dr. Vinicius Ernani: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Beth Sandy: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Isaac Powell: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Isaac Powell: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Transcript:

RuthAnn Gordon:

Thank you for the question. I think one of the most important things we can do to empower our patients is to educate them. They really need to be prepared for what they can expect when they’re on their journey and also what their responsibilities are and what the clinician’s responsibilities are. What are going to be the expectations? And outlining that in a format that they’re comfortable with so considering what their literacy is, how they like to learn is important in those empowering conversations. Learning about the patient, building that relationship with them so you understand their learning styles, so you understand what they might need more direction on or more education on is  really important. 

And the reason why all of those things are important is because we want our patients to feel like they’re being heard. We want them to feel like no matter how big or small the question that they should ask it, that we are in a place to support them and help them and that we want to hear their questions. And we want to educate them. And we want them to feel like they have the best support that they need, the most appropriate support that they need in order to be educated and empowered and informed and a part of the process.

It’s important to make your patient a part of the process. It is we are in this, we are doing this. What do you need? What can I do to help? And really giving them that confidence. You understand what their needs are, and you want them to speak up and that it is safe to speak up, and that your questions will be heard here. I think that makes patients feel empowered, and it also gives them more self-confidence. And with confidence comes so many other healing things. And so I think it’s really important to help them with their processing with everything that’s going on is to empower them and educate them. And educating them will empower them.

Dr. Kami Maddocks: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Kami Maddocks: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

What benefits can patients and care providers see from empowering patients? Expert Dr. Kami Maddocks from The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center explains benefits that she’s seen in her patients and ways that she helps encourage deepening of their knowledge and capacity for informed treatment decisions.

See More from Empowering Providers to Empower Patients (EPEP)

Related Resources:

Dr. Vinicius Ernani: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Beth Sandy: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Isaac Powell: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Isaac Powell: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Transcript:

Dr. Kami Maddocks

I think empowering patients is so critical, because I think when they understand their disease better, the treatment options, or why they’re not receiving treatment and kind of what their journey could look like, that they overall do much better. I think when a patient comes in, I like to give them my explanation of their disease, make sure that I am answering all of their questions, information. Some patients have read a lot before they come in and some have not read a lot. I like to provide them with websites or areas of information that I know is accurate and up-to-date information and encourage them once they read that to give us a call.

We also provide them some written information and I have a 24-hour line. And I always encourage patients, I don’t know whether you’re getting treatment and having a side effect, whether you’re at home worrying about a symptom, whether you have a question about what’s going on, I don’t know that you’re worried unless you let me know.

So I like to encourage patients, if you have questions, concerns, please reach out. We also have a portal where patients can ask non-urgent questions if they’d rather have it in writing, but I think making sure that they know we’re here to help them. I think offering information on clinical trials, I encourage patients if they have questions or concerns on the information they’re provided that they think about second opinions.

And patients that I see for second opinions I like them to know that you’re getting great treatment locally or this treatment is something that you don’t have to drive here for if you need treatment. But I’m always available if there’s other concerns or something doesn’t seem right. So I think making sure that patients’ questions are answered. I think making sure that they are comfortable getting other opinions if they need to and making sure that they know that if they have concerns they should reach out and not worry or use Google but use us to help them.

Dr. Rafael Santana-Davila: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Rafael Santana-Davila: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

What are some ways for cancer patients to be empowered by experts? Dr. Rafael Santana-Davila with the University of Washington School of Medicine shares his perspective and benefits of patient empowerment.

See More from Empowering Providers to Empower Patients (EPEP)

Related Resources:

Dr. Vinicius Ernani: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Beth Sandy: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Isaac Powell: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Dr. Isaac Powell: Why Is It Important for You to Empower Patients?

Transcript:

Dr. Rafael Santana-Davila: 

An empowered patient is a patient that does better, because they know what’s going on. They have a better understanding of the disease. They’re better engaged. So how do you empower your patients? It’s a very difficult question to answer, because I don’t think that there’s a recipe to do this. And every patient is different. But what I try to do is to educate patients and know that these are hard conversations that a lot of it is going to be over their head. So you have to do a lot of re-education. And when I say over their heads, I’m not meaning that they are not smart enough to get it, it’s just they’re going through a lot. So you have to be simple with them. You have to meet them where they are and just do a lot of re-education and talking about the things that you think you’ve talked about, but many times they were thinking about something else, and they didn’t get it.