LC Newly Diagnosed Archives

Your lung cancer diagnosis is just a starting point. Even though the path ahead may seem unclear or even insurmountable, armed with knowledge you can take control.

Let us help you become empowered to understand your diagnosis, to confidently ask questions, and to identify providers that are the best fit for you.

More resources for Lung Cancer Diagnosis from Patient Empowerment Network.

Symptoms of Lung Cancer

Symptoms of Lung Cancer from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Founder and CEO of CanSurround, Meg Maley, alongside a panel of Niki Koesel. MSN, ANP, ACHPN, FPCN, Eric Roeland, MD, and lung cancer survivor Randy Broad discuss two of the most prominent symptoms of lung cancer, shortness of breath and anxiety. There are great drugs and energy conservation techniques to combat the cycle of those two symptoms.

The Patient Experience

The Patient Experience from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Founder and CEO of CanSurround, Meg Maley, alongside a panel of Niki Koesel. MSN, ANP, ACHPN, FPCN, Eric Roeland, MD, and lung cancer survivor Randy Broad discuss the patient experience. The key to treatment is how to manage both the symptoms and side effects of cancer treatments.

The Emotional Side of Cancer

The Emotional Side of Cancer from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Founder and CEO of CanSurround, Meg Maley, alongside a panel of Niki Koesel. MSN, ANP, ACHPN, FPCN, Eric Roeland, MD, and cancer survivor Randy Broad discuss the emotional side of cancer and how symptom and comfort management should be apart of your treatment from the beginning.

Communicating With Your Healthcare Team

Communicating With Your Healthcare Team from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Founder and CEO of CanSurround, Meg Maley, alongside a panel of Niki Koesel. MSN, ANP, ACHPN, FPCN, Eric Roeland, MD, and lung cancer survivor Randy Broad discuss the importance of communicating with your healthcare team. They agree in having a life planning conversation while you’re healthy is one of the best things you can do.

Finding the Right Care for You

Telling the Full Story

I’m a bit miffed at the moment. I was just on the cancer treatment center site where I received my care and the opening page reads in bold, “Ranked No. 5 in U.S. for Cancer Care”. Seriously, ‘No. 5’? It made me pause and think, why on earth would anyone want to be treated for something as severe as cancer by an organization claiming they’re ‘No. 5’?

Having gone through the experience of cancer treatment and knowing what I now know, I wouldn’t begin to consider being treated by ‘No. 5’. Fortunately for me I wasn’t, I was treated by ‘No. 1’. I was treated by subject Center that’s advertising ‘No. 5’, yet treated by same as ‘No. 1’? Confused?  Don’t because what I have to share is important to anyone diagnosed with cancer.

Cancer is complicated. Individuals diagnosed with the same type and stage is often different in symptoms, characteristics, and multiple treatment options from one patient to the next. There is no such thing as one size fits all when it comes to treating cancer. Thus you need to be cured by people who are qualified, knowledgeable, and above all, experienced. There are many moving parts in a cancer diagnosis; underneath, there’s a ticking clock.

For the record, I fired ‘No. 5’ following my diagnosis. They may officially be more like ‘No. 500’ but to me it didn’t matter, I knew they weren’t ‘No. 1’. During my initial visits, I met several of the team and didn’t like what I heard. Spare the details but trust had I stayed the course, doubtful you’d be reading this post. Determining your provider is literally a life and death decision, trust me.

Finding ‘No. 1’ requires research, networking, and a bit of luck. All applied in my case and I was fortunate to meet my oncologist. In the initial interviews, I brought along extra ears because you don’t hear every word the doctors communicate. Following the initial meeting with ‘No. 1’, my friend said, “You don’t need look further, he’s your guy.” I didn’t need the affirmation…but it helped.

I’m confident in every rated cancer center in the country there’s a ‘No. 1’ for a specific disease. Conversely there’s also a ‘No. 5’. So placing an overall rating or ‘quality #’ on the Center for validation of an overall one size fits all treatment is misleading. It is equivalent to rating a restaurant. They’re given ‘star’ ratings. You pretty much know what to expect given number of stars. However, when it comes to the food, some dishes are better than others with multiple chefs.

Randy and Renato MartinsThe point is you need to find a team of professionals knowledgeable about the recipe and how to bake it. The best way I know to accomplish is interview several, listen with a minimum of four ears, and make sure you are comfortable with the answers. If not, move on until you do. This is at the core of being an empowered patient and taking an active role in your healthcare. Something that is being stressed more and more as we move to a value based healthcare system.

‘No. 1’ he told me I would be treated with, ‘Intent to cure’. This is physician speak to get your mind thinking along the lines of living opposed to the alternative. What matters is treatment protocol and how adjustments are made along the way. In many cases what begins as a straightforward pathway quickly becomes finer tuned.

I was deemed operable following my first round of chemo. While on the table and wide open, I became ‘inoperable’ due to undetected infected lymph nodes. While splayed open like a gutted fish, my team of doctors debated best strategy for moving forward. Do we remove the lung, leave it, take out a portion, how long recovery from each, what next, etc.? Throughout they’re calculating potential outcome staying true to their objective of, ‘Intent to cure’. This is all transpiring real time while the anesthesiologist drip line keeps on trickling.

Making adjustments as new developments present themselves as described is not the work of a ‘No. 5’. It’s clear and straightforward, ‘No. 1’. Living proof is the most valid testimonial I’m aware of.

Before you put a label and a ranking on any organizations service, make sure you’re telling the full story. Not just what some independent association attaches from a myriad of data points. There’s a lot more under the hood than stating you’re ‘No. 5’ and posting for the general public. Personally, my Center, and more importantly the people within who treated me, is ‘No. 1’. That’s the bigger Story and one you can live by.

Being Your Own Advocate

Tamara Lobban-Jones, Patient Power Producer and Lung Cancer Community Manager, and Lisa Goldman, a stage 4 non-small cell adenocarcinoma patient discuss why cancer patients need to be their own advocate.

They discuss the need for doctors and patients to communicate in new ways that respect the balance between a doctor’s expertise and patients’ own thoughts and knowledge. With the ever increasing developments in cancer research, it has become harder for oncologists to understand everything about each specialized form of a certain cancer. As Lisa points out, all that patients need to know about is their own cancer, so they can dedicate more time and energy into researching than a doctor may be able to. Being an active participant in your cancer journey is the best way to feel confident in your decision making.

Being Your Own Advocate from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

How to Develop a Personal “Medical Résumé”

When people are applying for jobs, they develop a résumé. This document has all the important details regarding their work history, education, etc. Patients need a résumé too! However, patient résumés are different. Employment résumés are created to get great jobs; medical résumés are created to acquire great healthcare experiences.

In early 2007, my mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease. My mother also had many other medical issues, including diabetes, hypertension, colon cancer and atrial fibrillation. My mother was on many medications and saw many different doctors from various health systems. It was challenging managing my mother’s care, until I developed two pieces of paper that changed everything! I created the “medical résumé.”

According to the Joint Commission, the organization that accredits healthcare organizations, the biggest cause of medical errors is botched handoffs. A handoff is a transition of care, such as going from a hospital to a rehab center. Patients could play a vital role in ensuring safe handoffs via the medical résumé. My mother experienced many handoffs, and I was able to avert many errors through the medical résumé. After my mother was handed off, I would always review my mother’s pertinent medical history and provide a copy of her medical résumé. I lost track of how many times I heard this statement, “This is a life-saving tool. I wish all patients had a medical résumé!” Healthcare organizations have volumes of information on each patient. The medical résumé helps them quickly see all the most important details.

Develop your medical résumé in the form of an electronic file. This can be accomplished easily via a word processing system. The information can be simply updated at any time. Always keep in mind the golden rule of electronic files, have a backup copy!

Below are some suggested items to include in your medical résumé. A medical résumé looks exactly like an employment résumé! I developed the look of my medical résumé based on the appearance of my business résumé. Have major headings with bullet points; just like this article! You want to make it very easy for professionals to quickly and accurately review your information. It may seem like a challenge to include all this information on just two pages. However, you’ll be very surprised as to how much information you can pack into two pages!

Contact Information

At the top of your medical résumé, include the following information:

  • Full name, address, city/state/zip, landline/cell phone numbers and email address
  • Personal data including date of birth, social security number and any patient identification numbers from your medical centers

Insurance Information

Include company names, phone numbers and account numbers.

Allergies

Since allergies could be life threatening, it is important that they be listed early on in your medical résumé. I am allergic to sulfa drugs and scan dyes. I used to just mention these two items; however I found healthcare professionals wanted details. They would often ask what kind of reaction I had – a slight rash or a serious reaction that resulted in a hospitalization? I now include brief but significant details about my reactions and you should too.

Medications 

List all the medications you are taking. Do not assume that all healthcare professionals are familiar with your medications and their uses. In addition to pills, also include inhalers, injectable therapies, drops, and ointments. For each medication, include the following:

  • Medication name (be specific, don’t simply say “high blood pressure pill”)
  • Purpose of medication (for example, “used to treat Type II Diabetes”)
  • Dosage
  • Frequency (e.g., number of times taken per day)
  • Pharmacy contact information

Illnesses and Surgeries

This is a place to list significant illnesses and surgeries. You do not need to include every cold you had in your life! For each major illness or surgery, include the following:

  • Type of issue (e.g., knee replacement surgery, prostate cancer)
  • Date of issue (include month and year)
  • Treatments (e.g., surgery, radiation, specific chemo drugs, etc.)
  • Current status (mention if you are in active treatment or when treatment was completed)

Physicians

For each of your current physicians, list the following:

  • Full name (do not just say “Dr. Smith”)
  • Area of medicine (e.g., internist, oncologist, etc.)
  • Location / hospital affiliation
  • Phone number

Emergency Contacts

Include the person’s name, relationship and mobile phone number.

In addition to the personal medical résumé consider developing a family medical history document. Our family developed this type of document, which proved very useful when seeing a new healthcare professional. Also, if appropriate, have an electronic copy of Power of Attorney documents. My brother and & I were my mother’s Power of Attorney. We had an electronic file of this document and could easily print when it was requested.

Medical résumés get the job done!

Activating a Community of People Living With Lung Cancer

Screen Shot 2015-10-22 at 5.16.16 AMNovember is Lung Cancer Awareness Month, and although lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the world, the disease has long been stigmatized, leading to a sense of isolation for people already struggling with the considerable upheaval of a lung cancer diagnosis. Many living with this disease have said that connecting with others who also have a lung cancer diagnosis can inspire them to learn to “live with lung cancer.”

 

LVNG With Program

Through a new program called LVNG With (pronounced “Living With”), AstraZeneca, with the partnership of three leading lung cancer advocacy organizations (Bonnie J. Addario Lung Cancer FoundationFree to Breathe, and Lung Cancer Alliance), are activating a community of people living with lung cancer and their loved ones, to share their experiences and inspire one another. More than 100 people with lung cancer and their loved ones contributed to the development of LVNG With by sharing personal stories about their emotional journeys with lung cancer and their everyday lives.

Richard, who was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2004, conveys a sentiment that we’ve heard from countless people who are living with lung cancer and who contributed insight to this program: “I never imagined myself being an advocate for lung cancer. But I really do feel I need to be a voice. There need to be people who can speak out for lung cancer and give other people hope.”

Initial elements of the LVNG With program include a web site (www.LVNG.com), printed quarterly newspapers and live events, all intended to activate and connect those within this underserved community. We intend to add social media elements, such as Facebook and Instagram,  to continue to activate a community of people living with lung cancer and their loved ones. These channels will serve as another forum to share personal stories, posts, and images, and to invite people to post their own.

Following are excerpts from the personal stories you can find on at www.LVNG.com.

Dann’s Story

Dann, who was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2006, shared the following on Emotions:

“It’s important to do things that you feel give you some control. It feels totally out of control to be given this diagnosis, but there are things that are within your control.

“Exercise is one of those. It’s a mood elevator. It also is helpful to do all of the things that you can do to influence your treatment. Choosing which treatment provider that you have, choosing who you are going to involve in treatment.

“I’ve found that on the one or two occasions when I went to appointments by myself, it was much more stressful. So having other people share the experience with you is important.

“I feel a lot more deeply and I have a lot more awareness of my feelings. My gratitude for everything around me has grown exponentially. Stopping to smell the flowers is not just one of those clichés. I stop and smell the flowers, I stop to appreciate a couple of words that my secretary said when I walked by or that the sun is out today.

“There is so much more that I appreciate.”

Deena’s Story

Deena

Deena

Deena, who was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2012, shares the following perspective on Friends and Family:

“My relationships have changed, especially with my children. They saw a crack in Mom that was unexpected. I’m more fragile now than I was before. I was always the tough one, the disciplinarian. I had no health issues at all. The diagnosis came out of the blue for all of us.

“Our grandkids live a bit further away and we used to not see them as often, but now we won’t miss out on anything. There was a birthday party for our granddaughter and because her brother came down with a fever everyone else decided to stay out of the ‘sick house.’ We showed up anyway. I wanted to be there for every birthday party she wants me to attend.”

 

If you know someone who is facing a lung cancer diagnosis or may wish to participate in a live event in 2016, please share LVNG.org as a resource. We plan to add new stories to the LVNG With web site on a regular basis. If you wish to contribute a story, sign up to keep in touch.

 

John McCarthy

John McCarthy

John McCarthy is VP, Global Commercial Excellence, AstraZeneca

How to Communicate With Your Medical Team

During a recent town meeting for lung cancer patients, families and caregivers, Katie Brown, Certified Patient Navigator and Vice President of Support and Survivorship Programs at LUNGevity, explains how LUNGevity can help patients gain the knowledge and support they need to participate in meaningful and productive discussions with their medical team. An informed patient is a confident and empowered patient. Knowledge leads to confidence and shared decision-making.

LUNGevity and other patient advocacy organizations offer patients information about their disease, clinical trials and treatment options. Patients will have the opportunity to connect with other patients that have the same disease condition and share stories about their diagnosis, treatment and how they cope with their illness. They can then take comments and questions back to their medical team for discussion.

In the video below, Dr. Malcolm DeCamp, Chief of Thoracic Surgery, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University explains that it is crucial that patients communicate physical and emotional changes to their medical team. The patient plays a major role in their plan of care and they need to provide constant updates and information to their team so that they can get the best care they deserve.

The Stigma of Lung Cancer

Tori Tomalia

Tori Tomalia

Tori Tomalia is a stage IV lung cancer patient, avid patient advocate and a writer and blogger. You can find her at Lil Lytnin’ Strikes Lung Cancer 

In the spring of 2013, my biggest concern was juggling my time between grad school, work, and caring for my 4 year old son and 2 year old twin daughters. The nagging cough and increasing exhaustion were pushed to the back of my mind as mere side effects of trying to take on too much. As my breathing troubles increased, my doctor began treating me for asthma, but none of the half-dozen inhalers and pills seemed to make any difference. It wasn’t until a CT scan revealed an enormous mass in my left lung that the words “lung cancer” entered my vocabulary. By then, the cancer had spread throughout my bones and liver. At age 37, I was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. Inoperable, incurable. Terminal.

Screen Shot 2015-10-22 at 5.16.16 AM

How could that be possible? I was never a smoker. Like all of us, I had heard over and over that smoking causes lung cancer, but sadly I have learned first-hand that the truth is much more nuanced. Smoking is bad for you, that is obvious and I doubt you could find a single American who hasn’t heard that yet. But so is living a sedentary lifestyle, so is eating junk food, so is having too much stress. It wasn’t until I received my horrible diagnosis that I learned there is one cancer where patients are blamed for their disease, and made to feel that they do not deserve a chance at a cure.

 

If you think I’m exaggerating, take a look at the numbers:

  • Lung cancer takes more lives than breast, prostate and colon cancers combined – it accounts for 27% of all cancer deaths.
  • Lung cancer is the second leading cause of all deaths in the US.
  • The federal government spends about $26,000 in research dollars for every breast cancer death. They spend less than $1,500 per lung cancer death.
  • 160,000 Americans will die of lung cancer this year. 80% will be never smokers or nonsmokers (people who once smoked but have quit).
  • Lung cancer in never smokers is the 6th leading cause of US cancer deaths.
  • Lung cancer kills almost two times as many women as breast cancer, and three times as many men as prostate cancer.

Lung cancer is the second leading cause of death in the USA! You would think funders would be tripping over each other trying to find better treatments and cures, but the bias against this disease is incredibly powerful, and it is costing people their lives.

Another sobering development is that the incidence of lung cancer in young, nonsmoking women is on the rise. Theories abound, but there is no consensus on what is driving this troubling trend. For me, the “why” is less important. What matters to me is more time with my family, and the only way that is going to happen is through research and more treatments for lung cancer.

November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month, and what I ask of you is to simply become aware. Become aware of this disease that is a threat to every person with lungs. Become aware of the precious nature of each breath you have the joy of taking. Become aware of the challenges facing people with this disease. Become aware that no one deserves this.

And if you still feel that the people of all stripes with lung cancer are not worthy of your compassion, well there’s this old story I heard about throwing stones….

How to Prepare for a Second Opinion Doctor Appointment

Expert physicians and cancer patients agree that getting a second opinion is crucial, even if you are very pleased with your primary medical team. It is your health and your life; take care of yourself!

A second opinion will help you learn more about your illness and treatment options. What you learn also will help you communicate intelligently with your medical team to get the best, most personalized care.

But doctor appointments can be scary, overwhelming and intimidating. There is the possibility of bad news and the apprehension of receiving confusing an difficult-to-understand information. Here are some tips to help you make the most of your second opinion appointment.

Prepare in advance

Plan to take a trusted friend or family member with you

This is critical. Memory retention is only 10% and less when you are stressed. You will not remember everything that is said during the appointment. You need to have someone there with you to be ‘another set of eyes and ears’. Then you can discuss key points with this other person to make sure you both heard the same information, go over options, and, if appropriate, ask for their input and opinion,

Record the conversation

Ask the doctor if you can record the conversation. Pull out your smartphone and record it! Then you can play it back at your leisure and discuss it with your family and the person who accompanied you to the appointment. You can then go over key issues, play back critical discussions and not miss anything!

By the way, many expert physicians have endorsed the idea of recording the discussion at a doctor appointment so don’t be afraid to ask!

Think of questions to ask and write them down ahead of time

No one thinks and speaks at the same time and does it effectively. And stress adds to the mix. So plan ahead and write your questions down to prepare yourself for the appointment. For example:

  • Confirmation of diagnosis
  • What are the next steps?
  • Am I eligible for a clinical trial?
  • What are my treatment options and does the second opinion doctor agree with the original treatment options?
  • What are the side effects of the treatment options?

If a clinical trial is advisable, you can ask these questions:

  • What is the purpose of the study?
  • Who is sponsoring the study, and who has reviewed and approved it?
  • What kinds of tests, medicines, surgery, or devices are involved? Are any procedures painful?
  • What are the possible risks, side effects, and benefits of taking part in the study?
  • How might this trial affect my daily life? Will I have to be in the hospital?
  • How long will the trial last?
  • Who will pay for the tests and treatments I receive?
  • Will I be reimbursed for other expenses (for example, travel and child care)?
  • Who will be in charge of my care?
  • What will happen after the trial?

Bottom line: You do not need to become a medical expert in your disease. By following the guidelines above, you can become more knowledgeable to make informed decisions about your path to improved health and quality of life.

 

 

Bringing a Family Member to a Doctor Appointment

A cancer diagnosis is an overwhelming, life-changing, disruptive event in the life of anyone. When a patient goes to meet their doctor, they are usually stressed, anxious and afraid. Therefore, it is helpful and advisable for them to have a family member with them to take notes, record the conversation, ask questions and basically monitor the appointment and keep track of what transpired. The patient can then talk over the appointment touch points with the family member after the fact.

Also, the family member can either confirm or elaborate on the discussion with the doctor. It is often difficult for the patient to remember events or details when asked questions about side-effects, coping with their illness, day-to-day regimen and mental attitude. A family member can help provide these details and can add validity.

It is helpful to prepare for a doctor appointment by making a list of questions to ask and a list of events or topics to talk about. A family member can help with this and even record the conversation if that is necessary.

Make the very most of your doctor appointments by asking a family member to accompany you!

Watch the following video as Dr. Malcolm DeCamp of the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center explains why bringing a family member to a doctor appointment is a great idea.

Bring a Family Member to Your Doctor Appointment from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Does Patient Empowerment Lead to Better Cancer Treatment Outcomes?

According to a study presented at the World Congress of Psycho-Oncology (WCPO) in late July, 72.3% of patients diagnosed with cancer defer their treatment decisions to their doctor. While this number is not surprising, it is cause for concern.

With a diagnosis of cancer comes a barrage of possible options for treatment. Often, choosing between these options can be overwhelming and intimidating, especially as there is typically not a clear answer and many uncertainties in terms of potential outcome.

How can we help patients navigate these tough decisions, such as whether or not to get a second opinion or participate in a clinical trial? How can we help patients gain the confidence they need and help them feel empowered and in control as they discuss treatment options with their healthcare team?

 Helping patients self-advocate

A survey done last year by Patient Power of 1295 chronic cancer patients showed that 73% of those
surveyed said the health information they found online helped them feel more confident and more in control of their health (see infographic at the end of this post). Learning about your illness from experts and from other patients can be a rewarding and empowering experience.

Organizations such as the Cancer Support Community (CSC) and others, including us at the Patient Empowerment Network (PEN), offer programs to help patients stand up and advocate for themselves and become informed so that they, in partnership with their heath care team, can make the right decisions for them.

Programs and resources designed to empower patients

The study presented at WCPO found that educational workshops, such as the CSC’s Frankly Speaking About Cancer program, that aim to educate and empower those affected by cancer can have dramatic outcomes in terms of patient confidence in making treatment decisions. In fact, the study found that as a result of attending a Frankly Speaking About Cancer workshop, 85.5% of respondents reported having increased confidence in discussing treatment options and making treatment- related decisions with their health care team. (Harvey, et al 2015)

 

Live audience at a recent town meeting for patients

Live audience at a recent town meeting for patients

PEN’s Town Halls and Patient Café programs give patients and carers tools and resources to discuss treatment options, including clinical trial participation, with their doctor and their family and make informed and empowered decisions throughout their illness.

Participant surveys from these meetings are overwhelmingly positive. Over 80% typically rate the event as good to excellent, and many write in emails like the following:

 

 

“Thank-you for all you do and have done to help those of us with CLL better understand this journey we are traveling.   The information you give is such a great help when I talk with my doctors and just for peace of mind in better understanding what I am facing.  Mary”

Answering your questions about clinical trials

In addition to helping facilitate conversations about treatment decisions, PEN offers a comfortable and convenient place to find user-friendly information about clinical trials. One of our goals is to help you understand the process by introducing you to people just like you who have participated in, or are considering participating in, clinical trials. We also offer opportunities to hear from doctors, nurses, caregivers, caseworkers and others about their perspective on what it means to participate in a clinical trial.

Patients helping patients

"Powerful Patients" at a recent town meeting

“Powerful Patients” at a recent town meeting

There are many resources available to help patients navigate their journey and we encourage you to take full advantage of them. If you can’t find what you need, don’t hesitate to reach out to let us know how we can better help you. And, most importantly, please remember, you are not alone. We stand beside you as a community of patients helping patients.

 

 

 

 

Patient Power Infographic

Sources:

http://www.cancersupportcommunity.org/General-Documents-Category/Research-and-Training-Institute/Posters-and-Presentations/Factors-Influencing-Treatment-Decisions-Among-Cancer-Patients.pdf

http://www.patientpower.info/about/survey-results-2014

 

 

Stage III Lung Cancer Survivor

Meet Randall Broad. He is a Patient Empowerment Network board member and a 7-year lung cancer survivor. He attended the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual conference in Chicago, Illinois, the weekend of May 29 – June 2, 2015. This year’s theme focused on the patient experience. He identified a paradigm shift. He says the conversation focused on “putting the patient first [and] making the patient a huge part of the treatment equation.” Broad also says he left ASCO with an important message: value-based healthcare. Value-based healthcare places patients and physicians in a more significant role in examining all treatment costs and outcomes.

Screen shot 2015-06-07 at 3.56.46 PM

Make a Defining Decision

On March 28, 2008, Broad received of diagnosis of stage III non-small lung carcinoma. Currently, Broad is an executive-level small business owner and father to two beautiful children. Before his diagnosis, he said his health was a non-issue, as he had always been healthy. Following his diagnosis, Broad felt concerned with his care and made a critical decision. “I fired my ‘first’ crew,” says Broad. He identified this as the turning point for improving his outcome.

Broad reminds anyone with a new cancer diagnosis to interview their doctor. “It is so incredibly important that you find the right team. It is a team. It is not one person,” says Broad. Following his diagnosis, he reached out to the local hospital that had treated him his whole life. His care team referred him to an internal oncologist.

“When I interviewed the surgeon, he basically pushed me out of his room – I don’t think that was his intent, but that is what he did,” says Broad. From March 28th, 2008 – January 2009, he made a vital choice to mentally and physically accept his diagnosis. “I chose the cancer over letting it choose me—meaning that I am going to embrace this, accept it as part of my life because if I try to fight it, beat it, I figured it would probably win,” says Broad. His choice demonstrates a firm conviction to embrace cancer with hope and optimism. Early in Broad’s journey with lung cancer, surgery became the next viable option, but after a series of imaging studies, his cancer was deemed inoperable.

Find a Community of Patient-Advocates

Often when an individual receives a diagnosis, there is no specific set of instructions for where to look or how to find a network of survivors for advice. “You don’t go to the yellow pages and look it up,” says Broad. With lung cancer’s high mortality rate, finding an advocacy group is all the more challenging. He says it was not until he had lived a couple of years with the disease that he learned about advocacy organizations and focused on being a proactive patient-advocate in cancer communities.

With the vast amount of content available online, Broad says there is more information about the disease but not information about where to receive treatment. After moving past the first experience with a potential surgeon, he found himself at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA). He says meetings with Dr. Renato Martin at SCCA validated the credibility of his surgeon. Broad says relationship-building is pivotal for quality patient care.

From August 2008 to November 2008, Broad received radiation and combined chemotherapy with radiation. He sometimes spent up to 13 hours a day at the University of Washington Medical Center and SCCA. To counteract the physical exhaustion from treatment and cancer, Broad attempted yoga, massages, facials, pedicures, acupuncture, and prescribed medication, however, these remedies only provided short-term relief.

Focus on What Truly Matters

At the time of Broad’s diagnosis in March 2008, his two kids were 13 and 14 years old—a highly formative time in their lives. Before being diagnosed with cancer, Broad says, “I didn’t spend as much time with my kids.” Previously, he was intensely focused on his business to provide a sustainable life for him and his children. Cancer opened the doorway for Broad to rectify the relationships with his children. “My kids are the most important aspect of my life,” says Broad. Through his conscious mindset to embrace cancer and the extraordinary moments with his children, he found himself cancer-free in 2009. Broad then published a personal memoir in 2010 to demonstrate how all human beings should live every day as if we have cancer. “Adversity is another step to your goals.” (Excerpt from It’s An Extraordinary Life – Don’t Miss It).

During a 2010 speaking engagement, Broad opened by saying, “it is the change that takes place when you get diagnosed with
cancer, with a life-threatening form of cancer. Things that used to be important are not as important, [and] things that are really
important take on a much greater sense. The sense of immediacy is really in front of you at all times.” His message centers on
encouraging everyone to live in a joyful and meaningful manner despite the hand that has been dealt.

Empower Cancer Communities Through Mindset

Broad and his children are committed to mindful decision-making and empowered thinking. When treatment concluded in January of 2009, Broad continued to have scans every couple of months. He says, “every year that passes, the chances of [cancer] reoccurring is minimized.” Broad was diagnosed with cancer over ten years ago and remains cancer-free today. He now shares his journey domestically and is committed to working with patients and families to be proactive patient-advocates.
Broad currently presents at about ten events a year. During one of his speaking engagements with sixty lung cancer patients,
twenty people approached him to say, “it never dawned on me to fire my crew, my oncology team.” Broad has dedicated his life to the empowerment of individuals with all types of cancer. Stay up-to-date with Broad’s latest speaking engagements and written work: It’s an Extraordinary Life – Don’t Miss It.

Randy Broad, Lung Cancer Survivor, Speaks Out for PEN

Watch this video as Randy Broad, lung cancer survivor and PEN member speaks out and invites others to join PEN!

(this video was produced by Patient Power for the Patient Empowerment Network)