Tag Archive for: African American community

How Can Advanced Prostate Cancer Disparities Be Reduced?

How Can Advanced Prostate Cancer Disparities Be Reduced? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

What are some ways that advanced prostate cancer disparities can be reduced? Expert Dr. Isaac Powell from Karmanos Cancer Institute discusses early detection, recommended screening ages for African Americans versus European Americans, and how some government agencies can aid in reducing disparities.

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Are There Worldwide Links to Aggressive Prostate Cancer?

Are There Worldwide Links to Aggressive Prostate Cancer?

Advanced Prostate Cancer Outcomes: Addressing Disparities and Exploring Solutions

Advanced Prostate Cancer Outcomes: Addressing Disparities and Exploring Solutions

Do Prostate Cancer Genetics Differ in African Americans?

Do Prostate Cancer Genetics Differ in African Americans?

Transcript:

Lisa Hatfield:

So, Dr. Powell, in your work, have you come across any innovative approaches or interventions that have shown promise in reducing racial disparities and improving outcomes for patients with advanced prostate cancer?

Dr. Isaac Powell:

Yes. Number one, educating the community about prostate cancer. Early detection is extremely important. I tell them that they should get their PSAs and digital rectal exams. I also tell them again, about obesity and exercise, how important it is to do that because it may prevent prostate cancer. And in terms of advanced disease, to just try to do the best they can and prolong in the survival by participating in clinical trials. And so I do quite a bit of educating in the African American community. In fact, in the ‘90s, we went to 51 churches, African American churches to talk about the prostate cancer and we also did testing. And what we learned in the ‘90s that mistrust factor was a major factor that prevented men from going in to be tested.

We also learned that men really don’t take care of their bodies as they should, and women have played a major role in the healthcare of men. So we start educating women about prostate cancer and encouraging their husbands to come in for examination, and very frequently, the wives have to bring their husbands in for testing or insist that they do that. I have this statement, I have a slide that says, men, they better care of their cars than they do of their bodies. And, in fact, they deny that they have any symptoms, and when they do, they don’t do anything about it until it’s too late.

Lisa Hatfield:

I have one follow-up question to that too, so you mentioned screenings, and I looked up prior to talking with you just to see what the general guidelines are for screenings for men, for prostate cancer, and it seems like they run the gamut. Do you have recommendations, or do you think the recommendations will change guidelines for screening and given your data and your research, is there a difference in screenings between European Americans versus African Americans?

Dr. Isaac Powell:

Yes. Because of what I’ve been talking about the cancer grows faster, and the significant cancers, the ones that are growing faster and become metastasized began in the 40s in African Americans, and so for European Americans has been recommended testing at age 50. I recommend age 40, American Cancer Society recommends age 45. Now, I believe at age 40, and I tell my patients that’s when they should start, African Americans that is, start testing for prostate cancer, specifically the PSA and digital rectal exam, and particularly if they have a family history. Now, the family history, if they only have one or two members is not much different than the aggressiveness among African Americans or European Americans.

If they have five or six members, not just a prostate cancer, but breast cancers as well, that means that they have a strong family history for having prostate cancer. If they have breast cancer, ovarian cancer in their family, or colon cancer, lung cancer, all those cancers are responsible for having a cancer and any specific cancer, if you have prostate cancer, breast cancer, you’re at risk for having colon cancer, for example. So that’s more recently talked about, multiple cancers in the family are even more important than having just prostate cancer in your family.

Lisa Hatfield:

Dr. Powell, given your expertise, what policy changes or healthcare system reforms do you believe are necessary to tackle the racial disparities in advanced prostate cancer care on a broader scale?

Dr. Isaac Powell:

Yes, policies are made by the government essentially. And so you have to encourage CDC, Centers Disease Control, US Preventive Services, which has done a disservice and prostate cancer. In fact, in 2012 they had that PSA did not show any evidence of preventing death from prostate cancer. They rescinded that 2017 recognizing that their recommendation 2012 was incorrect, and so US Preventive Services and the CDC, as well as the National Institute of Health NIH, have to come together and say, this disease is not only prostate but breast cancer, triple-negative breast cancer, colon cancer, lung cancer, all of these are more aggressive among African Americans, and we have to make a statement that screening has to be done earlier, education has to be emphasized.

And, in fact, COVID testing, it was almost mandatory on the circumstances that that happened. We used to demand that syphilis tests be tested if you got married. The government can also make it mandatory to be tested if your age, 45, American 50 for prostate cancer and maybe other cancers as well. So the government has to play a major role in establishing policies for testing, and I think that that would be very helpful in eliminating the disparity. 

Lisa Hatifield:

And then from the patient perspective, it sounds like, and just trying to clarify this to when you talk about screenings for a patient to get screened to the appropriate time, that includes both the PSA test and the digital rectal exam, is that correct?

Dr. Isaac Powell: 

Absolutely.

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