Tag Archive for: breast cancer screening

October 2021 Notable News

It’s important to keep things in perspective, especially when there is a lot of information coming at you, and there is a lot of information this month. From unwarranted vaccine concerns and real concerns about fighter pilots to potential new therapies involving CBD oil, anti-nausea meds and immunotherapies, it’s a lot to take in. The most important take away is to make sure you exercise and make sure you know your cancer risks and when you should get your screenings.

Breast Cancer Screening

Black women may want to consider starting mammograms at age 40 rather than age 50, says sciencedaily.com. New information shows that breast cancer deaths in black women could be reduced by 57 percent when screening is done every other year beginning at age 40. The study was done as part of an effort to develop equitable health recommendations for black women who tend to have higher rates of aggressive cancers at younger ages than white women. Learn more here.

Preventing Cancer with Activity

Americans could be preventing more than 46,000 cancer cases each year, reports medicalxpress.com. New data shows that physical inactivity, especially in women, led to three percent of all cancer cases in adults aged 30 and older. While meeting the recommended guidelines of five hours per week of moderate intensity activity could prevent those cancer cases, researchers note that there are often obstacles in the way of people meeting exercise requirements such as access to safe places to exercise, childcare costs, and long working hours. Learn more here.

Immunotherapy

Researchers may have discovered a new way for immunotherapies to be used against more cancers, reports mit.edu. With the new method, researchers remove tumor cells from the body and treat them with chemotherapy. They then put the cells back in the tumor and administer drugs that activate T cells. That combination seems to be the trick to awaken the immune system. Researchers found that cells that were injured by the chemotherapy were more successful at triggering the immune system than dead cells were. Learn more about this promising new immunotherapy method here.

Dexamethasone Benefits

An anti-nausea drug could be the key to better short-term survival for patients who have surgery for some types of cancer, reports usnews.com. Researchers found that patients who received dexamethasone were about one-third less likely to die in the 90 days following their surgery. In order to prove the findings, clinical trials will need to be done. Learn more about dexamethasone and it’s potential to increase patient survival here.

Lung Cancer and CBD

A case study reported in medicalnewstoday.com showed that a lung cancer patient who took CBD oil showed a reduction in her tumor. CBD oil is a concentrated extract of cannabis leaves or flowers which is often used by cancer patients to treat pain, and the side effects of chemotherapy such as nausea and vomiting. The female patient, located in the United Kingdom, was in her 80s and smoked more than a pack of cigarettes a week before and after her diagnosis, and did not change her diet or lifestyle while she was being monitored. During a two-and-a-half-year period, her scans showed a progressive decrease in her tumor. Learn more about the case study here.

HPV Vaccine

Parents are expressing concerns about the safety of the HPV vaccines despite 15 years of evidence that they are safe and effective, reports cancer.gov. The HPV vaccine protects against cancers caused by the human papillomavirus and is recommend for 11- and 12-year-olds, but the study shows that the number of parents who declined the vaccine for their children due to safety concerns nearly doubled between 2015 and 2018. However, during the same time period the reports of serious complications from the vaccine were rare. Researchers suspect that social media use is a factor in the increased doubts about the vaccines. Find our more here.

Fighter Pilots and Cancer

United States Air Force Fighter Pilots and crew members are more likely to get some cancers than other members of the Air Force, reports defenseone.com. A comprehensive study among pilots and crew of fighter aircraft found that they were 29 percent more likely to be diagnosed with testicular cancer, 24 percent more likely to be diagnosed with melanoma, and 23 percent more likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer. Researchers are encouraging fighter aviators to discuss the study and their potential cancer risks with their care providers. Get more information about the study here.

Check out nwaonline.com for a really nicely written perspective about celebrating anniversaries from a ten-year cancer survivor here.

How Can BIPOC Breast Cancer Patients Overcome Health Disparities?

How Can BIPOC Breast Cancer Patients Overcome Health Disparities? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

How can BIPOC breast cancer patients help overcome health disparities? Experts Dr. Nicole Rochester and Dr. Regina Hampton share ways to be more proactive with breast cancer screening, in interaction with healthcare providers, and in sharing breast cancer stories.

See More From the Best Care No Matter Where You Live Program


Related Programs:

How Can Breast Cancer Patients Connect to Patient-Centered Care?


Transcript:

Dr. Nicole Rochester:

You alluded to the different care sometimes that patients of color receive. So I want to shift and talk about racial and ethnic inequities, and unfortunately, we know that with every other illness, unfortunately similarly with breast cancer, there’s a long history of women, particularly in BIPOC communities receiving disparate care, a lot of times they are not offered some of these treatment options, maybe they don’t have access to some of the breast cancer centers, so can you just share some information about some of the disparities that we see, in breast cancer? And then I’m curious to know how you specifically address them being a Black woman breast surgeon 

Dr. Regina Hampton: 

So, one of the things to know is that as African American women, we tend to get breast cancer at younger ages, and not a lot of physicians know and can recognize that, so it is very important that when a young African American woman has a breast complaint that that’s taken seriously and worked up to make sure that we’re not missing a breast cancer. So, I think it’s important again to have those conversations talking about family history, because we don’t talk about family history, in our families. I’ve had a patient just come in and say, Yeah, well, grandma had a breast missing, no no nobody said cancer, well they probably should’ve said cancer, so we’ve gotta have those health conversations in our family, so I think it’s important for patients to really be their advocate because many times these young women are dismissed and thought, “Oh, you’re too young,” and I’ve even been kind of fooled myself by some of the young women, so knowing that younger women get breast cancer at younger ages, if you think something is going on, you need to really take that seriously. And then I think it’s also talking about the options, we do tend to get a more aggressive form of breast cancer, but the treatments have changed, and while chemotherapy may be indicated for many patients, it’s not for all patients, and so really taking that time to understand what all the options are, “Well, why are you recommending chemotherapy? What’s going to be the benefit for me? What’s the survival benefit for me? What are the side effects? How this going to affect my sex life? How is this going to affect me and my relationship with my children, with work?” 

So really just asking all of those important questions, I think it’s also important to ask for what you want. I don’t think we speak up enough, there was actually a study that I was looking out that shows that we don’t get offered reconstruction as often as our white counterparts. The disparity is about 24 percent, and that’s really huge. That’s important. So, we really need to ask those questions and to know, well, maybe I can’t get reconstruction at this juncture, but can I get it in the future, there’s a federal law that covers all of those for all breast cancer patients, no matter what color you are, so again, it’s just asking those questions. Sometimes taking somebody and having somebody else ask the questions can be helpful. 

Dr. Nicole Rochester: 

Yeah, making somebody else the bad guy, so to speak. Absolutely, any time I have a conversation about health disparities and health and inequities, honestly, I get a little angry inside because for you to share that statistic that we’re not as often offered reconstructive surgery, that is a huge part of our identity as women. Our appearance, our self-esteem, and I just want to point out for our viewers that unfortunately, as Dr. Hampton has stated. A lot of times, these disparities are sometimes due to lack of knowledge, so Dr. Hampton mentioned that Black women tend to get breast cancer at a younger age, and you need to know that if you’re seeing a breast surgeon or even an internist or oncologist who is not a person of color or who is not up-to-date on that information, they may not know those statistics, but unfortunately, there also is this bias that you’ve talked about as well, and we know that we all have bias, we are exposed regularly to negative images, negative stereotypes of African Americans, Latino, Native Americans, and doctors are not immune to that bias and we carry those biases into the exam room, and so for people of color with breast cancer, it is particularly important that you follow these recommendations that Dr. Hampton has mentioned, and I just love that really all of them center around advocacy and speaking up for yourself and standing up for yourself. Are there any other things, Dr. Hampton in closing that you can think of specifically for patients of color, things that they can do to really protect themselves from these inequities that exist in breast cancer care. 

 Dr. Regina Hampton: 

I think we have to really start at the beginning and being more proactive about our screening, making sure that we’re getting those mammograms, making sure that when we get a mammogram, we’re asking for the best mammogram if there’s new 3D technology, making sure that you get that so that we can find things at an earlier stage, and I think also we have to call it kind of throw out all the myths. We got to let them go people, we got to let them go. And I know there have been some challenges and we have had some historical issues, I think Dr. Rochester and I both agree and acknowledge that, but at some point, we have to move forward and be more proactive and really knock down some of those barriers and not let some of those old things that happen hold us back from the new technologies that are available. So, I think the good thing, we’re in a day and age where most early-stage cancers are not a death sentence and we find them early, we can treat them early, and I think we have to just talk in our community, I’m always amazed that many Black women still don’t share their stories. 

So, you have women who are in the same circle and don’t realize that the person two seats down went through breast cancer, and you all still go to coffee, and she didn’t share her story. And now you’re facing breast cancer, you’re thinking, “Wow, I’m just alone.” And so, I think we have to really share that, not only in our families, but we’ve got to share it with our sisters, because you never know who you’re going to be helping through that journey. I find it interesting that there’s really a difference between how African American women take a breast cancer diagnosis and white women take a breast cancer diagnosis, and we’re getting ready to really look at this, and I’m really excited about it because I really want to know what is it and why is there such a difference? But I think we have to not hide, we have to really share our stories, and sharing your story is going to help somebody else. 

Dr. Nicole Rochester: 

Absolutely, I think part of the hiding and even what you mentioned about the family history not being shared as part of this kind of myth that we have to be strong or that Black women are invincible and that we can’t be vulnerable. And you’re absolutely right, we need to talk about this in our circles, we need to talk about it with our daughters or nieces, all of our family members, so that we’re all educated and empowered.  

Dr. Regina Hampton: 

It’s funny you mentioned that because that’s one of the first things I tell patients to do. I say, “Look, you’ve got to let other people take over, because we’ve got work to do, and kids have got to eat peanut butter and jelly, they’ve just got to eat some peanut butter and jelly, they’ll be all right, but you’ve got to put yourself first.” And I think if we put ourselves first, put our screenings first, we’re good about getting our kids, getting them to their health appointments, we as women have got to get ourselves to our health appointments and put ourselves first, so that we can be there for our families. 

Dr. Nicole Rochester: 

You just reminded me of something we as women, are really good at taking care of our kids and our spouses and other members of our family, but then we do that at the expense of ourselves, and I can say when I used to practice as a pediatrician, we were trained to address postpartum moms, and people realize early on that, hey, okay, they may not have their postpartum visit for six weeks, but they’re taking that baby to the pediatrician in two or three days, and so we would talk with the postpartum moms about screening them for depression and things of that nature, but I never thought about…you literally just gave me this idea that maybe pediatricians should also be checking in with our patients’ moms and asking them about their screening, I don’t know if they would be offended by that, but it truly takes a village, and so maybe we need to be encouraging the parents of our patients and making sure that they’re getting their regular screenings and their health maintenance as well, because you’re right, we will look out for the babies, and we will put ourselves on that back burner every single time.