Breast Cancer Newly Diagnosed Archives

Your diagnosis is just a starting point. Even though the path ahead may seem unclear or even insurmountable, armed with knowledge you can take control.

Let us help you become empowered to understand your diagnosis, to confidently ask questions, and to identify providers that are the best fit for you.

More resources for Breast Cancer Newly Diagnosed from Patient Empowerment Network.

Empowered! Podcast: Meet Andrea Conners

Today, we’re extremely proud to introduce our first-ever Empowered! podcast. Empowered! will bring you conversations around topics that are important to patients and care partners.

For our first episode, we meet Andrea Conners. Andrea is Patient Empowerment Network’s Executive Director. Andrea shares a little bit about herself, about PEN, and her inspiration in getting involved.


46 Year Old Kristen Nauss Recently Diagnosed With Breast Cancer

This podcast was originally posted on WVFM on September 17, 2018 here.


5 Things Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Patients Should Know

This was originally published by Cynthia Demarco on April 19, 2019 on MD Anderson Cancer Center here.


If you’ve just received a breast cancer diagnosis, you probably have a lot of questions: What type of breast cancer do I have? How advanced is it? Do I qualify for any clinical trials? Can my doctor provide the treatment I need?

Before you start making treatment plans and scheduling appointments, here are five things to know.

Get an accurate diagnosis before starting treatment

Not all breast cancers are the same, so it’s important to get an accurate diagnosis right from the start. This is particularly true if you have a rare or very aggressive form of the disease, such as inflammatory or triple-negative breast cancer.

That’s because the type of breast cancer, as well as its stage and location, can determine the types of treatment you’ll be offered, as well as those you’re not eligible for.

“We offer precise treatments based on precise diagnoses,” says Lavinia Middleton, M.D. “That’s why I believe everyone should get a second opinion. A second opinion can be a game-changer. About 25% of our patients will see a change in their diagnosis.”

Where you go first for breast cancer treatment matters

All patients who come to MD Anderson will have their diagnoses confirmed by our doctors. This ensures that your cancer is both correctly identified and accurately staged — two crucial steps in determining which treatment plans you’ll be offered.

“Your first shot is your best shot at beating cancer,” says Makesha Miggins, M.D. “So, when patients come to us after they’ve already been elsewhere, their cancer treatment is often more challenging. That’s why I tell people to come to MD Anderson first.”

“If my cancer had been just a little more advanced, it would have been considered stage IV, and my care would have been palliative instead of curative,” adds Jenée Bobbora, an inflammatory breast cancer survivor. “But my doctor insisted that my cancer was at stage IIIc, not IV, so my treatment included chemotherapy, a double mastectomy and radiation. And I’ve shown no evidence of disease since 2003.”

Seek out the experts for your breast cancer diagnosis and treatment

It’s also critical to choose a cancer center with extensive experience in treating your particular type of breast cancer.

MD Anderson sees thousands of breast cancer patients annually, and has entire teams of specialists focused on specific types of breast cancer, such as triple-negative and hereditary cancers.

“Not only can we identify rare types of cancer with confidence, we can also keep women from having invasive diagnostic procedures for conditions that are not cancer,” says Therese Bevers, M.D.

“Breast cancer can have so many different variables,” adds Kelly Hunt, M.D. “And each one influences our treatment recommendations, because each one can significantly impact a patient’s response to different therapies. It’s critical to know these things before leaping in, because often by doing chemotherapy or targeted therapy first, we’re able to shrink the tumor and eradicate cancer in the lymph nodes involved. That means we can do less surgery and still have excellent long-term results.”

Consider clinical trials for your breast cancer treatment

Clinical trial options exist for virtually every type and stage of breast cancer. But some clinical trials for breast cancer are limited to patients who have not yet begun treatment. That’s why it’s important to discuss your options with your physician as early as possible.

Over the past few years, clinical trials at MD Anderson have allowed our breast cancer patients to avoid double mastectomieshave tumors removed painlessly without general anesthesia, and explore more personalized treatment options.

“My trial was unique because I was able to start with traditional chemotherapy and move on to other treatments only if that didn’t work,” says breast cancer survivor Barbara Lewis, of the immunotherapy clinical trial she participated in. “Only seven months after diagnosis, there were no traces of cancer in my body. That’s about the best result you can get.”

Make multidisciplinary care mandatory

No matter what type of breast cancer you have, it’s crucial to seek treatment at a cancer center that offers multidisciplinary care. This approach, which was pioneered here at MD Anderson, brings together all of the specialists you’ll need for your care — such as oncologists, surgeons, radiation oncologists, etc. —  to formulate your treatment plan.

Coordinating patient care as a team ensures that every aspect of an individual’s situation is taken into account from the start. It also makes it easier for your care team to adapt and make changes to your treatment as it evolves.

“It’s all about preserving options,” Hunt says. “I see patients all the time who were treated elsewhere with surgery first, when that might not have been the best approach. Now, they need more surgery or other treatments. And they’re painted into a corner, because they have fewer options. Our comprehensive approach means patients don’t have to go through multiple procedures to get the best results.”

Multidisciplinary care also gives patients easy access to any additional support services they might need, such as social work counselorsdietitians, physical therapists, lymphedema specialists and support groups.

“My gynecologist gave me the name of three Houston oncologists to choose from, but it was up to me to check them out,” adds Helen Vollmer, on the challenging start to her breast cancer journey. But once she got to MD Anderson’s Breast Multi-Team Clinic, “It was all confined to one, incredibly caring place with a team who talked to each other and, more importantly, to me.”

Overall Health and Mindfulness Improves Treatment Response: An Expert Explains

Overall Health and Mindfulness Improves Treatment Response: An Expert Explains from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Dr. Sangmin Lee shares the benefits of meditation and yoga and explains how mindfulness can affect your overall health.

Dr. Sangmin Lee is a hematologist-oncologist specializing in blood disorders and blood cancers at Weill Cornell Medicine and New York Presbyterian Hospital. More about Dr. Lee here.

See More From The Fact or Fiction? AML Series


Related Resources

Your AML Navigator

Facing a Cancer Diagnosis: Advice From An Expert 

What is Personalized Medicine?

Transcript:

Patricia:

How about this one? A positive attitude and mindfulness can improve treatment response.

Dr. Lee:

Absolutely. Absolutely. Treatment for leukemia can be tough. Some of the treatment involves intense chemotherapy. Treatment for leukemia can involve stem cell transplant. And a key important aspect of treatment is being healthy and being optimistic about treatment, because a lot of treatment can have side effects, and side effects can be not as apparent if you are physically more active, and in a good state. So, I think that having a positive outlook is very, very important.

Patricia:

Quality of life issues are difficult for some people. How do you talk with your patients about their quality of life, and staying healthy during their treatment?

Dr. Lee:

So, quality of life is absolutely important. I mean, the whole point of treating leukemia and any other treatment is not only to address the leukemia, but also have good quality of life. So, when discussing treatment options, you always have to balance the quality of life and side effects versus potential benefits. So, that’s always on our mind when discussing potential treatment options, and how it impacts the quality of life. Throughout the treatment process, we always tell our patients that being active, and having a good quality of life, and having good nutrition, is absolutely important, because that’s a key aspect of treatment for leukemia.

Patricia:

What about meditation and yoga for coping with anxiety around cancer diagnosis and treatment? Mindfulness.

Dr. Lee:

Absolutely, absolutely. Those can help. Especially having leukemia, it’s very life-changing, so a typical way that patients are diagnosed with acute leukemia is patients live a normal life, and then they develop, all of a sudden, abnormalities. And they’re diagnosed with acute leukemia, and it can be very sudden. And it can be very difficult. So, that can understandably make patients have anxiety, and other issues.

And I believe that meditation, and yoga, and other exercises can absolutely help cope with this.

Patricia:

And there’s tons of resources for meditation and yoga out there, that are reliable.

Dr. Lee:

Yes. Yeah.

Patricia:

Yeah. Should patients regard yoga and meditation as part of their treatment, as part of their self-care, during this process?

Dr. Lee:

Absolutely, absolutely, if the patients are into meditation and yoga. Meditation is very harmless, and it can absolutely help in terms of guiding their mind through their treatment journey. Yoga is good if you’re physically able to do it. So, one caution is that, if you’re not someone who does yoga normally, then you should start off slow, and not push yourself as aggressively.

Sugar Feeds Cancer: Fact or Fiction?

Sugar Feeds Cancer: Fact or Fiction? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Does sugar feed cancer? Dr. Sangmin Lee addresses the rumored connection between sugar and cancer.

Dr. Sangmin Lee is a hematologist-oncologist specializing in blood disorders and blood cancers at Weill Cornell Medicine and New York Presbyterian Hospital. More about Dr. Lee here.

See More From The Fact or Fiction? AML Series


Related Resources

The Pro-Active AML Patient Toolkit

Assessing Credible AML Resources and Identifying Research Scams

AML Treatment Side Effects: What’s Fact and What’s Fiction?

Transcript:

Patricia:

Okay, a little more fact or fiction, here. This is what we’ve heard from patients who have AML about cures, okay? Sugar feeds cancer, and severely restricting my diet will treat my AML.

Dr. Lee:

That’s not proven so far. There are some laboratory studies, especially with keto diets, showing some promise, maybe. But then it hasn’t been proven in humans, yet. The most important thing about AML treatment is actually nutrition. As patients go through AML treatment, it’s very important to stay healthy, and part of that is nutrition.

So, starvation, in general, is not recommended, because nutrition is so important, in terms of being able to undergo the treatment, as well as treatment visits, and everything. So, we recommend that nutrition is very important.

Are Clinical Trial Participants Monitored More Closely?

Are Clinical Trial Participants Monitored More Closely? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Dr. Sangmin Lee discusses the monitoring of clinical trial participants and the measures taken for patient safety.

Dr. Sangmin Lee is a hematologist-oncologist specializing in blood disorders and blood cancers at Weill Cornell Medicine and New York Presbyterian Hospital. More about Dr. Lee here.

See More From The Fact or Fiction? AML Series


Related Resources

AML Genetic Testing Explained

Advice for Newly Diagnosed AML Patients

The Power of Positivity: Advice from an AML Patient

Transcript:

Patricia:

How about this next one? I am monitored more closely in a clinical trial.

Dr. Lee:

In some cases, it’s true. Clinical trials do have certain monitoring visits, in terms of doctor’s visits, laboratory tests, and physical exams.

The purpose of that is to make sure that it is safe. So, the purpose of monitoring closely, in a lot of cases, is for the patient’s safety. We are testing drugs in a lot of clinical trials, for which the complete safety profile, as well as efficacy profile, is not known. So, the purpose of closer monitoring is to make sure whatever we’re doing is safe, and if there are any unexpected side effects, then it allows us to address the side effects, as well. So, it’s mainly for patients’ safety.

Will Clinical Trials Cost You? The Facts.

Will Clinical Trials Cost You? The Facts. from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Dr. Sangmin Lee reviews the financial impact associated with clinical trials, including a discussion of what expenses are covered for participants.

Dr. Sangmin Lee is a hematologist-oncologist specializing in blood disorders and blood cancers at Weill Cornell Medicine and New York Presbyterian Hospital. More about Dr. Lee here.

See More From The Fact or Fiction? AML Series


Related Resources

Confronting Fears About Clinical Trials

AML Research and Internet Claims Program Resource Guide

Second Opinions in AML: The Importance of Moving Swiftly

Transcript:

Patricia:

All right, how about this one: I may have unexpected costs if I join a clinical trial.

Dr. Lee:

So, typically, that’s actually, usually not true, because how it works is that the clinical trial drugs, and that there may be extra procedures or visits associated with clinical trials.

And what usually happens is that the sponsor of the clinical trial provides the cost of the drug, intervention, and anything extra that are required for the clinical trial. So, in the end, the cost of participating in a clinical trial should not be any more than receiving standard care treatment.

In some rare cases, there may be stipends associated with the clinical trial, especially with travel. So, if you participate in a clinical trial, and you live far away, then you should ask to see if there is any stipends available, especially for travel.

Examining the Link Between Gestational Diabetes and Breast Cancer

Approximately 12% of all U.S. women will develop invasive breast cancer during the course of their lives. There are a number of common risk factors associated with breast cancer, such as excessive alcohol consumption, obesity, genetic mutations like BRCA1 and BRCA2, and a family history of breast cancer.  In recent years, the link between diabetes, and particularly gestational diabetes, and cancer has been examined more closely to determine whether this group of women are especially at risk. A better understanding of gestational diabetes and its long-term effects make it significantly easier to understand its link to breast cancer.

What exactly is gestational diabetes?

Gestational diabetes develops during pregnancy and can, when untreated, cause health complications for mother and baby. When a woman has gestational diabetes she will display high blood sugar levels that typically return to normal after the pregnancy. Although any complication during pregnancy can be alarming, it is important to note that gestational diabetes can generally easily be controlled through a healthy diet, regular exercise, and in extreme cases, medication. While gestational diabetes does not necessarily result in serious complications, it is important to be aware of the risks for both mom and baby.

The link between gestational diabetes and breast cancer

Although women with gestational diabetes do not present an increased risk of breast cancer according to studies that have been conducted, it does increase their risk of contracting type 2 diabetes later on. In fact, up to 10% of all women who had gestational diabetes will develop type 2 diabetes according to the National Institutes of Health. This can occur anywhere from within a few weeks after delivery to months or even years later.

Type 2 diabetes proven to increase breast cancer risk

The risk for developing breast cancer is significantly higher among women with type 2 diabetes according to findings published in Diabetes Care. Postmenopausal women above the age of 50 are most at risk with a 27% increased risk of breast cancer. Type 2 diabetes triggers a number of changes in the body such as high insulin level, high glucose levels, and increased inflammation that may increase breast cancer risk. The connection between type 2 diabetes and breast cancer may also be a two-way street as breast cancer survivors could be at an increased risk of developing diabetes following chemotherapy.

Despite gestational diabetes not having a direct impact on breast cancer risk it can, in a more indirect way, increase the risk. By following a healthy lifestyle after a gestational diabetes diagnoses it is possible to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes later in life which has directly been linked to the onset of breast cancer.

Ten Things I Wish I Had Known When I was Diagnosed with Breast Cancer

As soon as the first golden leaves of autumn appear on the trees a feeling of sadness starts to descend over me. I’m catapulted back over the years to a late September day. A day that’s etched forever on my mind. The day I was diagnosed with breast cancer.

In the weeks that followed my diagnosis, I became enveloped in a sea of pink as Breast Cancer Awareness Month took place. But when October came to an end and the pink ribbon wearers disappeared, I was left wearing the everyday reality of the disease. Over a decade has passed since then and yet I still feel a sense of sadness when I think of that time and all I had yet to learn and go through. I can’t help wondering how much my experience might have been different if I had known then what I know now.

One thing I now know is that we owe it to those who come after us to share our hard-earned wisdom. So in that spirit, here are ten things I wish I had known back when I was a newly diagnosed patient.  I hope sharing these lessons may make the path towards recovery that little bit smoother for others who are new to this journey.

1. Everything in your life is about to change

Once you’ve been baptized in the fire of cancer your life as you knew it will be irrevocably changed. The apparent randomness of a cancer diagnosis can shake your sense of identity to its very core and afterwards nothing will ever feel certain again.   Cancer invades not only your body but every other area of your life, including your relationships, family life, friendships, finances, career, and even your sense of self. You may be surprised to find the people you thought you could count on disappear from your life. At the same time, you will be surprised to find support can also come from unexpected sources.

2. Online support is real

Among those unexpected sources will be the people you meet online. Online communities may be virtual but they are no less real in terms of support and advice. On Facebook and Twitter you can find patient communities which will be an invaluable source of information and support to you. Check out the #BCSM Twitter chat – a weekly chat for breast cancer patients and their caregivers.

3. You will feel fearful and anxious

One of the most common emotional and psychological responses to the experience of cancer is anxiety.  Cancer is a stressful experience and normal anxiety reactions present at different points along the cancer pathway. Anxiety is a natural human response that serves a biological purpose. It’s the body’s physical “fight or flight” (also known as the stress response) reaction to a perceived threat. You may experience a racing or pounding heart, tightness in the chest, shortness of breath, dizziness, headaches, upset tummy, sweating or tense muscles. All of these signs indicate that sympathetic arousal of your nervous system has been activated, preparing you to stand your ground and fight or take flight and run away from danger.

Try this coping tip. When we are fearful and anxious we tend to breathe more shallowly.  Shallow breathing, which doesn’t allow enough oxygen to enter our bodies, can make us even more anxious. Practice taking some slow deep abdominal breaths.  Deep abdominal breathing slows the heart down and lowers blood pressure. The advantage of focussing on the breath is that it is always there with us. We can turn to it anytime we are feeling anxious.

4. You are your own best health advocate

Although you may be reeling from the news of a cancer diagnosis, it’s important that you learn as much as you can about your diagnosis and what treatment options are available.  In this article, you will learn which questions you should ask your healthcare team and where to find reliable and trustworthy information to become better informed about your health condition.

5. Your will experience brain fog

Cognitive impairment, to a lesser or greater degree, can affect you both during and after your treatment. You may have the feeling that your cognitive abilities are slower and less acute than before – almost as if your brain is shrouded in a fog. We call this the “chemobrain” effect and the effect may persist for months or even years after treatment ends.  A more formal term – post-cancer cognitive impairment (PCCI) – is used by researchers to describe a group of symptoms, which include slow mental processing, difficulty concentrating, organizing, and multitasking.

PCCI symptoms can also include:

  • memory loss – forgetting things that you normally remember
  • struggling to think of the right word for a familiar object
  • difficulty following the flow of a conversation
  • confusing dates and appointments
  • misplacing everyday objects like keys and glasses

It’s still not clear how many people with cancer get chemobrain or which drugs cause it. However, there are several things that you can do to help you cope with its symptoms. Read this article for more information.

6. You will experience bone-crushing tiredness

We all know what it’s like to feel tired – physically, mentally, and emotionally, but usually after some relaxation and a good night’s sleep, we are ready to take on the world again. When you have cancer, though, rest often isn’t enough.  You experience a persistent, whole-body exhaustion. Even after adequate sleep or rest, you will still feel tired and unable to do the normal, everyday activities you did before with ease.

A lot of cancer patients don’t report fatigue to their doctors because they think that nothing can be done for it. In fact, there are things that can be done to alleviate the debilitating effects of cancer-related fatigue.  If left untreated, fatigue may lead to depression and profoundly diminish your quality of life, so it’s important that you speak to your doctor if fatigue is an issue for you. Read How To Cope With Cancer-Related Fatigue for more tips and information.

7. You may be surprised by feelings of guilt

Cancer-related guilt is a complex emotion. You may feel guilty and worry that your lifestyle choices somehow contributed to a cancer diagnosis. If you learn that you carry the BRCA1/2 gene, you may feel guilty that you could pass this gene mutation on to your children.  Or you may feel guilty that your cancer was diagnosed at an earlier stage than a friend or family member who has a worse prognosis.  These feelings of guilt may surprise you, but it’s a perfectly normal reaction to a traumatic life event like cancer. Read How Do You Deal With Cancer Guilt to learn more about this topic.

8. You will feel pressured to stay in a positive frame of mind

I admit I caved in at the beginning to pressure to stay strong and positive when I was first diagnosed with breast cancer. I did it because it reassured the people around me.  While I accept that for some people maintaining a positive attitude is a valid coping mechanism, for myself and many others, the pressure to always show our sunny side is a denial of our pain, anger, grief, and suffering. I now believe by promoting this attitude in the face of cancer, we create unfair expectations and deprive patients of an outlet for their darker fears. This is my personal viewpoint, and it’s one that I don’t expect everyone to share. However, I mention it here so that those who are newly diagnosed don’t feel they have to always present a smiling face to the world. It really is ok to express your fears, your sadness, your anger, and your grief too.

9. You will need time to grieve

While many people think of grief only as a reaction to bereavement, we can feel grief after any kind of loss. When we step back and look at the cancer experience we see that grief and loss are a fundamental part of the experience. Some of our losses are tangible, for example losing our hair, and some are more intangible, such as the loss of trust in our bodies.

Coping with the losses associated with cancer is challenging.  Grief brings many emotions with it. Patients, as well as caregivers and family members, may go through emotions of anger, denial, and sadness.  While there is no right or wrong way to grieve, there are healthy ways to cope with the pain and sadness that, in time, can help you come to terms with your loss, find new meaning, and move on with your life.   

10. Cancer doesn’t end when treatment does

I wish I had been better prepared for how I would feel when cancer treatment ended. I just assumed I would pick up where I had left off and get on with my life as if cancer was no more than a blip. I wish someone had told me that cancer doesn’t end when treatment does.    Sometimes, there can be a code of silence surrounding the aftermath of cancer treatment.  There is an expectation that when you walk out of hospital on that last day of treatment, your cancer story has ended. But in many ways it’s only just beginning.

I now know that cancer is more complicated than simply being disease free and that a physical cure doesn’t mark the end of the healing process. Adapting to changes in energy and activity levels, adjusting to altered relationships at work and in your personal relationships, coming to terms with a changed body image, and managing pain and treatment side effects are some of the things you will face in the post-treatment phase of recovery. Be compassionate and gentle with yourself as you move through this stage of your cancer journey. Don’t judge yourself or feel pressured by others to try to hurry this stage along.

Wrapping Up

Being diagnosed with cancer is a life-changing event. You will go through many emotions and experiences throughout the roller-coaster ride of diagnosis, treatment, and beyond. Each person will experience it in their own way. While there’s no right or wrong way to go through the experience, it’s important that you don’t ever feel as if you have to go through it alone. Reach out at each step of the way and find someone who understands what you are going through and can offer you the support you need.

Breast Cancer Before 40: How Can I Preserve My Fertility?

Breast Cancer Before 40: How Can I Preserve My Fertility? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Dr. Stephanie Valente discusses fertility preservation in breast cancer patients under the age of 40 and the potential for pregnancy following treatment.

Dr. Stephanie Valente is the Director of the Breast Surgery Fellowship Program at Cleveland Clinic. More about this expert here.

Related Program:

Breast Cancer Before 40: What You Should Know


Transcript:

Dr. Stephanie Valente:

So, another issue that is really important for young women is discussing fertility preservation. And this really needs to happen at the time of their diagnosis. So, we know that the cytotoxic agents that we can give females just through chemotherapy can decrease the ovary and the ability for these women to have menstrual periods after chemotherapy. So, the ability for them to get pregnant naturally.

As well as some of the medications. So, somebody who has a breast cancer that is estrogen positive, the recommendation is for these women to be on hormone suppressant medicine for five to 10 years after their breast cancer diagnosis and treatment, therefore not being able to be pregnant while on these medications. So, talking with young women when they get diagnosed about their family planning and their fertility options up front before they have surgery or chemotherapy is really beneficial.

And whether or not they need to see a fertility preservation specialist. If they want to consider IVF. Or if they have a gene, looking at genetic testing for their future offspring. So, these are all conversations that really need to happen before these women begin chemotherapy if they need it.

And the good thing is that at the young women’s clinic, these fertility specialists are embedded in the clinic. So, they are able to get an appointment with them right away. And a lot of times if these women do want to undergo fertility preservation, that can happen within 10 days of seeing the specialist. So, it really doesn’t delay their care. And we do know that it is safe even with the breast cancer diagnosis.

The other thing is that we do offer a medicine which is a GRNH agonist which will kind of essentially shut down the ovaries during chemotherapy to help protect them so that when a young woman is done with chemotherapy, it helps the ovary kind of get back to normal a little bit sooner.

So, it sounds good in theory. Unfortunately, it’s not something that is covered by insurance companies right now. And so, fertility preservation is expensive. And so, the good thing is there are a lot of groups that put together packages and stuff for these young women to be able to afford it. But it is pretty pricey. So, for those that can afford it, it is a great option. And a lot of them do take advantage of it. I think there are a lot of misconceptions about it. Number one is that patients don’t really know if it’s safe.

Number two, they are scared about their overall diagnosis and a potential delay and 10 days might make some of them afraid that doing that is a good option. Another thing is when these women come in with a diagnosis of breast cancer, they see a surgeon, a medical oncologist, a radiation oncologist, a plastic surgeon.

And so a lot of times an extra appointment at that point in time is just really overwhelming for these women. So, our goal is to kind of refocus and say, “Hey, the good news is that with our modern therapies you’re going to be here for a long time. So, let’s plan for the future now so that in the future you’ve got options.”

Breast Cancer Before 40: What You Should Know

Breast Cancer Before 40: What You Should Know from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Dr. Stephanie Valente reviews key information for women under the age of 40 with breast cancer, including risk, treatment approaches and the role of genetic testing.

Dr. Stephanie Valente is the Director of the Breast Surgery Fellowship Program at Cleveland Clinic. More about this expert here.

Related Program:

Breast Cancer Before 40: How Can I Preserve My Fertility?


Transcript:

Sure. So, when we talk about breast cancer in young women, usually we are referring to women under the age of 40. And the prevalence for breast cancer in general is one out of eight women. For women under the age of 40, it’s about a seven percent incidence of breast cancer. So, it’s about a seven percent incidence in the general population in the United States. So, that’s about 12,500 women per year are diagnosed under the age of 40 with breast cancer.

So, the prevalence has pretty much been the same over the years. We used to think that women diagnosed at a younger age had a more aggressive breast cancer. But the more we look at things, the more we realize that women under the age of 40 usually are diagnosed at a later stage because it’s not something that somebody in their 20s or 30s is thinking that a breast lump equates to cancer. So, these women unfortunately present at a later stage.

Many times, it’s because they are pregnant, breastfeeding or just not having any family history where the first thing they think of when they get a lump is that they actually have breast cancer.

So, the first thing is women under the age of 40 usually present at a later stage, meaning that they have larger cancers, and the cancers because they are larger have had more time to spread to the lymph nodes. So, these women they don’t necessarily have more aggressive breast cancers than older women, it’s just that it’s found at a later stage.

So, the treatment options are the same for young women with breast cancer. So, depending on the size of the tumor and the size of her breast, women are given the option for a lumpectomy which usually is follow by radiation versus a mastectomy. And studies have shown that either surgical choice is a good option for women. And that one surgery doesn’t make a young woman, or an older woman live any longer.

That the survival for breast cancer is based on stage not the choice of surgery that they pick.

So, one of the first things is that women under the age of 50 – the average age for breast cancer in the United States is between 64 and 68.

So, if you are under the age of 50 or under the age of 40 there’s a higher chance that maybe these women carry a gene that would increase the risk of getting breast cancer. And so nowadays, we test over 21 genes. But these genes can increase their risk of getting breast cancer not only in the breast they have the breast cancer in, but in their other breast as well. It also increases the risk for other types of cancers such as ovarian cancer. And they could potentially pass this gene on to their kids.

So, sometimes women – and this is the great thing about academic medicine. Everything is changing so quickly with the modern research. So, a lot of times a woman who is triple negative, which is an estrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

If they are genetic positive for the BRCA gene, they qualify for certain medications or chemotherapy that we know targets specifically that type of cancer and their gene. So, that’s why it is important for some of these women to get genetic testing to see if the certain chemotherapy regimens or medicines that we have would benefit their type of cancer.

So, one of the things for any woman diagnosed with breast cancer at a young age is to offer those women genetic testing. And sometimes it can be a relief or sometimes it can be very challenging for these women to think, “Oh my gosh. I have this gene. I’m at increased risk for more cancers.” And that potentially they could pass that on to their children.

So, having the women who come in meet with a genetics counselor to go over the risks. And the reality is that of all the women under the age of 50 that test for the gene, only 10 percent actually carry the gene.

So, the good thing is that 90 percent most likely don’t have the gene. But it still is an anxiety provoking thing for these women to go through.

Another thing is that these women a lot of times are younger. So, they have either two things – young children to take care of which is extremely difficult to mange an already stressful motherhood. You throw in a diagnosis of cancer, whether or not there is a dad involved or a father that needs to help out with these kids. A lot of times their families need to help out. So, we have a psych oncologist that’s part of our team. And it’s really great. How do you tell your kids you have cancer? And how do you manage kind of day-to-day life with going through this? So, that’s another great program that is offered. And importantly for a woman who doesn’t have children but maybe desires to have children or even to have more children than the ones that she has,
looking at fertility options for young women is huge.

So, we know that some of the chemotherapy that we give breast cancer patients decreases their ability to have children in the future. So, the chemotherapy can shut down the ovaries. So, sometimes women – and this is the great thing about academic
medicine. Everything is changing so quickly with the modern research. So, a lot of times a woman who is triple negative, which is an estrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

If they are genetic positive for the BRCA gene, they qualify for certain medications or chemotherapy that we know targets specifically that type of cancer and their gene. So, that’s why it is important for some of these women to get genetic testing to see if the certain chemotherapy regimens or medicines that we have would benefit their type of cancer.

So, the one thing is that I tell these women that breast cancer takes a good year between chemotherapy if they need it, surgery, radiation of they need it and the whole process of recovery. That is really takes a good solid year before they are kind of done going to their doctor’s appointments. But the reality is that for an early stage breast cancer, studies have show for young women the overall survival is over 92 percent. So, I say, “This is going to be a tough year. We are going to get through this together. And the good thing is that you are going to be alive in five, 10, 15, 20 years. And so, our goal is to get you the best quality of life not only now but in the future.”

As far as hope for young women with breast cancer, things are changing so fast. The medicine that’s out there – we’re doing these studies where women are getting chemotherapy and by the time they get to surgery about 40 to 60 percent of the tissue that I take out has no residual cancer. That’s phenomenal. That means that the medications that these women are getting are working really well for their cancer. And so, the hope is that in 10 years I don’t have a job because the medicine that they are getting works so well that the cancer can be removed without needing surgery. And so, I think in our lifetime we will find either a cure or a complete resolution of breast cancer.

Barby Ingle – What Advice Do You Have For Someone Who Is Newly Diagnosed?

As the president of the International Pain Foundation, a best-selling author, and chronic pain advocate, Barby Ingle shares her advice for the newly diagnosed. For all our A Conversation With… videos please click here.

Barby Ingle – What Advice Do You Have For Someone Who Is Newly Diagnosed? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Patient Profiles: Breast Cancer Part III

This is the last installment in our three-part series profiling breast cancer survivors. In Part II, the women gave insight into the importance of their mental health and their own attitude as critical components of care. They also shared some of the ways in which they coped with cancer. Today, the women talk about the possibility of recurrence. So, we pick up with the final stage of Shannon’s preventive measures. Based on her history, she knows her cancer can come back, but she wanted to do everything she could to prevent it.

Shannon’s treatment didn’t stop at reconstruction. She opted to have an oophorectomy, which meant she had her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed. Remember, her moms’s cancer had returned and been terminal, so Shannon wanted to take every preventive measure she could. “My fear and my worry is that hers came back 16 years later and she died at 65. If the same thing happened to me, I would die before I’m 60,” says Shannon. Her breast cancer diagnosis meant she was at higher risk for female cancers and she wanted to do whatever she could to have as much time as she could. “I’m relatively young,” she says. “I wanted to give myself as long as I could.” In order to have the procedure, Shannon had to take medication that would put her into menopause and the side effects that came with menopause affect her quality of life, so she says she goes back and forth on whether or not she would do the oophorectomy, if she had it to do all over again.

Although she did have melanoma a couple of years ago, Tina has been 27 years without recurrence of breast cancer. “I didn’t really feel safe until five years out,” she says, but adds that you never really know if it’s coming back, and that you should always be vigilant about checking for lumps. There is a risk of late recurrence, i.e. breast cancer that comes back more than five years after diagnosis and treatment, and it is more likely if it was later stage when first diagnosed, and if the cancer was HR positive.

Like Tina, Betty also had a second cancer. Her colon cancer was discovered in 2009 and her doctor estimated that it had been growing for ten years, but because of where it was growing in relation to the colon wall, the tumor was able to be cleanly removed and no treatment was required. Because her breast cancer was ductal and not in the tissue, and her doctor was able to get very clean margins, Betty says she doesn’t worry about it returning. “I’m more afraid of the colon cancer returning,” she says.

Diana has been nine years without recurrence, but she says, “My guard is always up.” Maybe it’s because her mother and grandmother both had breast cancer, and, despite being BRCA negative, she believes her cancer is hereditary. Shannon feels the same way and says she believes 100 percent that her cancer is genetic. The genetic testing available is limited compared to the number of genes in the human body so, Shannon says, “There’s a long way to go.” And, while it’s early for Shannon to think about recurrence, she can’t help but consider it. “I don’t want to spend every day thinking about cancer. I don’t want that to be my life,” she says, “but it is in the back of my head.” Not knowing how the cancer might come back makes Shannon especially uneasy because she doesn’t have a plan for it.

When Meredith finished treatment, her doctor said he didn’t expect to see her back for recurrence. The odds were in her favor that she would remain cancer free. Meredith, like Betty, says she got the best cancer to get if you’re going to get cancer, but unlike the other ladies, Meredith was not expecting to get cancer. She didn’t have the same family history. Her only red flag was that she had an aunt that had ovarian cancer and she thought maybe her grandmother had breast cancer when she was 90. Meredith was young, she had three small children, and breast cancer was not on her mind. In fact, she was so sure she didn’t have it, that she took her 18-month-old daughter with her when she got the results from her lumpectomy. But, Meredith, who is also BRCA negative, did have cancer, and while her cancer was ductal, it was bigger than it should have been, and there was also a spot on her other breast that needed to be watched. Wanting to be proactive Meredith opted for a double mastectomy with reconstruction. She also had chemotherapy, because the cancer was found in a lymph node, and she lost all her hair. While she possibly could have gone without radiation, she opted for it. Again, she wanted to be aggressive and as proactive in her treatment as possible. She wanted to make sure her cancer was gone.

About a month ago, Meredith found another lump under her arm. She had a scan that was all clear except for the spot where the lump is located. She and her doctors are hoping it is just scar tissue, but she’ll have a lumpectomy this week and then she’ll wait for the biopsy results, which she is guessing will take several days. “The waiting is the worst,” she says. Liz, as a caregiver, felt the same way about waiting, “The worst part of all of it was waiting for the results.”

Tina, who also had young children at diagnosis, recalls that she just wanted to live long enough to raise her children. She says she found it difficult to accept the idea that she might die before her kids were grown. That thought is clearly on Meredith’s mind as well. “I remember saying, ‘Just give me five more years,’ and now it’s been seven years, and I’m saying, ‘Just give me seven more years,’ but no amount of time is enough,” she says. You can hear in her voice that she’s trying to be brave, and she says, “Hopefully, it will all be fine,” but it’s scary because, even though Meredith got the best cancer you can get if you’re going to get cancer, it is still cancer.

Anxious to hear Meredith’s results? We are, too, and as soon as she gets her results, she’s promised to follow up with us. We’re hoping for good news, and we will let you know as soon as we can.


Sources:

https://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/understand_bc/statistics

https://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/diagnosis/hormone_status

https://www.breastcancer.org/research-news/20080813

http://www.who.int/cancer/events/breast_cancer_month/en/

https://www.cancer.gov/types/breast

https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/genetics/brca-fact-sheet#q2

Patient Profiles: Breast Cancer Part II

In the first part of of this three-part series, you were introduced to Betty, her daughter, Liz, Shannon, Tina, and Diana. You learned that women who are diagnosed with breast cancer are not really all that surprised to get a diagnosis. They are often expecting it. Having breasts is a risk factor, and women have breasts. In today’s installment, you’ll meet Meredith. She wasn’t expecting to get breast cancer. But, before we meet her, we’ll pick up where we left off in part one: the matter of hair loss and chemotherapy.

Whether or not a survivor lost her hair during cancer treatment, it’s one of the first things she says about her experience. Shannon even lost her eyelashes and they never came back. She says she knows it’s a little thing, but it still bothers her. Betty, didn’t lose her hair. Like a growing number of women, she did not have to have chemotherapy. She says avoiding chemo made a huge difference in her experience. At the time, Betty was receiving treatment at a research hospital, and there was a test available to her that would determine how beneficial chemotherapy would be in treating her cancer. She was told that if she scored between a one and a 19, she would not need chemotherapy. Betty scored an 18. While she had to pay for the costly test out of pocket and wait for insurance to reimburse her, she says it was worth it. “It was so helpful,” she says. “Because of what chemo does to your body, you don’t want it unless you need it.” Side effects from chemotherapy can include anemia, diarrhea, fatigue, fertility issues, hair changes/loss, memory loss, neuropathy, menopause and menopausal symptoms, mouth and throat sores, nausea, vaginal dryness, vomiting, bone loss/osteoporosis, heart problems, and vision problems. The test Betty had is now being more widely used and, as you may have read on the Patient Empowerment Network blog in the June Notable News here, researchers have learned that 70 percent of women don’t need chemotherapy when they have the most common type of early-stage breast cancer, with low and moderate risk of recurrence. The test looks at cells from a tumor biopsy to determine what is known as a patient’s recurrence score. Patients are scored between zero and 100, with zero being the lowest risk of recurrence. Researchers now know that women who score less than 25 do not necessarily need chemotherapy.

Betty also did not need to have a mastectomy. She had a lumpectomy followed by intraoperative radiation therapy, a 30-minute procedure that involves surgically placing a ball of radiation in the spot where the tumor had been. The procedure meant that Betty only had to have a single radiation treatment, and it helps reduce the side effects of radiation. Betty was eligible for that form of radiation in part because of the size of her breasts. She says she told the doctor, “I’ve been lugging around these big things my entire life and they are finally paying off.”

The intraoperative radiation was another benefit of being at a research hospital. At the time of Betty’s treatment, the procedure wasn’t being widely used and wasn’t available through her local doctors. Receiving treatment at a research hospital also made a difference in Diana’s care. She recalls going in to her local doctor’s office for her test results, and no one in the office would make eye contact with her. Then, when the doctor came in to see her, he told her she had breast cancer, that he wanted to treat it right away, that he’d see her next Tuesday, and then he left the room. Diana says she was left there shaking. “He has a heart, but he didn’t show it,” says Diana, who then went to a research hospital for a second opinion. Her new doctor was much better, she says, and adds that the shoulder of his lab coat was always dirty from the smudge of make up left behind after his patients hugged him.

The importance of good doctors that you are comfortable with seemed to be one of the critical components of care to all the women.They all talked about how much they liked and appreciated their doctors. “A really good physician realizes psychological and spiritual care are just as important,” says Tina, who sought the services of a psychologist after her treatment. She was struggling with anxiety and depression and found that the counseling really helped her to work through her emotions about having cancer, which emphasizes another, perhaps the largest, critical component of care during treatment: emotional and mental support and health. Diana says she found support online and emphasized the importance of staying positive through treatment. “Count your positives,” she says. “That is the key.” Along the same line, Betty says, “The number one thing is attitude.” Actually, she and Liz say “attitude” in unison, and Betty adds, “I think attitude is a big piece of it.” Meredith Cronin who was diagnosed at age 37, says “Attitude is everything.” Meredith, who had three children under the age of six when she was diagnosed, says she understands how easily you could get depressed as a cancer patient. “I always say that I felt blessed that I was young and so busy that I didn’t have time to be depressed.”

Shannon, who was accused of being negative because of her detailed planning to get breast cancer before she actually had breast cancer, says she wasn’t negative; she was realistic and it was that take on it and her preparation and planning that helped her maintain emotional balance.“It didn’t affect me emotionally as much as I think it would have,” she says. Shannon coped through research and attention to details, and she describes her experience in the kind of detail that makes you think she’d just had it done yesterday rather than three years ago. Betty used a different method of coping and says she’s been able to let a lot of the experience go. “I don’t dwell in that place,” she says. She and Liz also found a lot of humor in the experience. The clickity-clack of someone’s shoes, Betty’s preoccupation with cutting out recipes from a magazine, or the ridiculousness of what must have been an excruciating procedure, were all fodder for coping. It’s not that Betty doesn’t take cancer seriously, but she was better able to cope with the diagnosis by finding humor in the situation. “We laughed through our tears,” she says. Liz says that early on in the experience, they imagined the worst possible scenario, which made handling what really happened more doable. The ways of coping with cancer are as varied and vast as are the treatment options.

Next time, in Part III, recurrence.


Sources:

https://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/understand_bc/statistics

https://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/diagnosis/hormone_status

https://www.breastcancer.org/research-news/20080813

http://www.who.int/cancer/events/breast_cancer_month/en/

https://www.cancer.gov/types/breast

https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/genetics/brca-fact-sheet#q2

Beyond Pink: The Other Side of Breast Cancer Awareness and Lessons We’ve Learned From Each Other

It’s October and the pink frenzy is in full force.  Breast Cancer Awareness Month (BCAM) is impossible to miss given the pink ribbon avalanche that arrives each Fall.  While there is no denying that BCAM has played a significant role over the past two decades in raising public awareness of breast cancer, there is  nevertheless growing criticism of its off-balance approach to awareness-raising, with many key messages becoming lost in a sea of “pink-washing.”  Interestingly, some studies have even found that pink branding may actually lead the public to take breast cancer less seriously.

“The biggest issue I have with Breast Cancer Awareness month is that it’s not even really awareness,” writes Elizabeth McKenzie, who was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2012. “Awareness is mindfulness of all aspects of breast cancer, which to a certain respect, is different for all of us, based on medical differences in disease processes, treatment access, and personal, social-emotional and cognitive processes.”

Much of the criticism centers on breast cancer campaigns which over-sexualise the disease, equating breasts with womanhood and femininity. Rod Ritchie, who was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2014, points out that “October is a bad time for male breast cancer survivors because the trivialisation and sexualisation of the disease by the pink charities reinforces public awareness that breast cancer is gender specific. Since there’s little attempt to educate men that they need to be aware of symptoms too, we are diagnosed later and have a poorer prognosis. So, how about adding some blue to the pink, encouraging research on us, and screening those with a genetic propensity?”

Over a decade ago on an October morning, I was diagnosed with breast cancer; a double reminder each year of the role this disease has played in my own life.   Looking back, I now see that my view of breast cancer was one-dimensional. Standing today on this other side of cancer I see a broader picture, a richer landscape of many shades beyond pink. This post is intended to provide a truer picture of the lives of breast cancer patients in its many varied hues.  Wherever you are in your experience, whether you are caring for a loved one, recently diagnosed, finished treatment, or living with a recurrence or metastatic cancer, I hope this post will speak to you.

Lessons We’ve Learned From Each Other

Some of the most valuable lessons I’ve learned about breast cancer have come, not from my doctors, but from fellow patients. My doctors didn’t tell me about the effect of chemotherapy on my future fertility. I didn’t learn that treatment could damage my heart. And I finished treatment with no clue about late treatment side-effects or the risk of a cancer recurrence.

While valuing her oncologist’s expertise, Catherine Foy, who blogs at My Triple Negative Life, acknowledges that “within the online breast cancer community there will be someone awake somewhere in the world that can provide support and advice. For example, based on someone I followed I got my Vitamin D level checked which was very low and I am now on supplements. Other examples include creating awareness of late treatment side effects and reducing the feelings of isolation that some may experience.”

Liz O’Riordan, a breast surgeon diagnosed with recurrent breast cancer, and co-author of The Complete Guide to Breast Cancer, also refers to the feelings of isolation she experienced during her treatment. “I felt incredibly alone during my breast cancer treatment. I didn’t meet another patient at any of my chemo or radiotherapy sessions. All my advice was from amazing people on Twitter,” she says.  Liz offers this advice to patients undergoing chemotherapy:  “The two best tips I was given to reduce the side effects of chemo were: (1) Drink. Lots. Even when it taste disgusting. Ideally 3 litres a day. Try flavoured water or cordial. Carry a bottle everywhere you go. (2) Exercise. Walk for 30 minutes every day. You’ll hate me for making you. Some days you may have to stop and spit and pant and retch. But do it. You will feel better for it. And they were right. I did feel better.”

Barbara Jacoby of Let Life Happen agrees that we can learn valuable coping lessons from each other. “Whether it is a question of side effects that one is experiencing from a prescribed medication, or questions regarding treatment options or experiences or procedures, if you query a patient support or advocacy group, you are likely to find more answers and information from those who have had actual personal experiences with these issues. There is no doctor or group of medical professionals that has all of the information about real patient experiences and outcomes like any group of actual patients who have dealt with just about anything and everything imaginable on every level,” she says.

Both Catherine and Barbara believe that the information you get online should be shared and discussed with your doctors as the basis of shared decision making (the conversation that happens between a patient and clinician to reach a healthcare choice together).  “I value my oncologist’s advice and experience,” says Catherine, “and would usually discuss with him any new developments that I may have encountered through the various platforms on social media.”

Terri Coutee, a two-time breast cancer survivor, and founder of DiepCFoundation, a non-profit organization providing information on options for breast reconstruction after mastectomy, also embraces the concept of shared decision making and wants others to experience it too.  “I have had chemotherapy, radiation, two lumpectomies, a double mastectomy and breast reconstruction using my own tissue,” she says. ”Each of these occurrences was fraught with difficult decisions and hours of research to optimize my own health care plan. I left offices of various health care providers with armfuls of brochures and information to sort through and organize.”

Terri encourages patients to download the Breast Advocate App, a new tool to aid the shared decision making process.  The app was developed by plastic surgeon Dr Minas Chrysopoulo, whose patient population is primarily those affected by breast cancer or at high risk of developing breast cancer. “Shared decision making is an extremely powerful approach to deciding our treatment plans. Simply put, it empowers us and helps us advocate for ourselves,” explains Terri.  “As patients, we owe it to ourselves to embrace everyday conversations with our health care teams,” she says. “The information on the Breast Advocate app is informative, intuitive, and specific to your individual diagnosis or situation. There are treatment options with evidence-based articles to discuss with your healthcare team. It even features a community section. I encourage you to check out the wealth of shared decision-making information and download the Breast Advocate app to your phone.”

Siobhan Freeney, founder of Being Dense, an organization which raises awareness of Breast Density and its associated links to breast cancer and screening, was completely unaware of the issue until she was diagnosed with breast cancer. “40% of women have Dense Breasts,” she explains. “A Mammogram is the only way to determine and measure Breast Density.  In Dense Breasts the reliability of screening mammograms can be reduced by as much as 50%.”   When you have a Mammogram, the radiologist reading it can tell if you have Dense Breasts.  Siobhan recommends you should ask for a copy of your radiology Mammogram report and ask if your breasts are dense. “If you have Dense Breasts you need to know and you should ask your Doctor/Radiologist about more personalised screening such as Breast Ultrasound or MRI,” she advises.

Metastatic Breast Cancer: The Other Side of BCAM

Learning about metastatic breast cancer (MBC; also called stage 4, secondary, or advanced breast cancer) from online blogs and social media networks was revelatory for me. MBC is breast cancer that has spread beyond the breast — to the bones, liver, brain, or another organ. Even if the cancer is found in another organ, it’s still referred to as breast cancer. Like Beth Gainer, who says, she learned “that anyone who’s been diagnosed with breast cancer is at risk,” I too have found, in Beth’s words, “what the metastatic breast cancer community has had to say has been a real eye-opener.”

MBC has been referred to as a story half-told, the other side of BCAM we don’t hear enough about. As Catherine points out, “For me, breast cancer awareness month is for those who are not yet diagnosed or those newly diagnosed. The pink scene looks to future research and provides good information for those starting or in the midst of treatment. There is less focus on those of us living or dying with breast cancer.”

Nancy Stordahl is unequivocal in her criticism of the failure each October to adequately raise awareness of MBC. “Despite all the pink, all the races, all the pink ribbons, most people still know little or nothing about metastatic breast cancer,” she writes. “No wonder so many with metastatic breast cancer feel left out, isolated, alone and yes, even erased.”

Joanne Taylor, a metastatic breast cancer patient and advocate, is pushing for more information and awareness of MBC.  She created this infographic to show the red flag symptoms of advanced breast cancer.

While metastatic breast cancer is terminal and cannot be cured, because of improved treatments more women are living longer than ever with it. Even so, many misconceptions and lack of information about this diagnosis persist.    “A stranger called Elizabeth Richards contacted me and like many other women she knew very little about MBC, yet the more she found out, the more angry and amazed she became that the illness was side-lined,” says Joanne. “Elizabeth’s view was that as long as metastatic cancer wasn’t mainstream people would not be aware of the limited treatment options available to them. If they knew, they’d demand more.”

One of the biggest misconceptions is that MBC is an instant death sentence. “We thought with BCAM coming up we would do something different to show how people could live well with MBC, so we started the #busylivingwithmets campaign,” explains Joanne. “Elizabeth had the idea, it was positive, it showed what people can do if they have access to drugs and surgery. I was her inspiration! If I can do it, others can as well – if they are given the right options.”

Lessons of Resilience, Connection, and Hope

Cancer can be a lonely and isolating experience, but it doesn’t have to be. “A friend told me to accept whatever help was offered, says breast cancer survivor Connie Rosser Riddle. “It was her way of saying to quit being Superwoman, that it was okay to be in need, vulnerable. It was best to be specific when folks asked, “What can I do for you?” My answer combined what that person was best at and where I needed help, and that made a good fit for both of us.”

Audrey Birt, diagnosed with breast cancer three times, shares lessons of courage, connection and resilience on her blog.  “Cancer taught me I’m more resilient than I would have believed, it helped make me braver,” she says. “It also taught me that life cannot be controlled. This made me more able to live in the moment, and for the moment.  That’s probably not so good for my bank balance but it’s great for my life balance in a way. It taught me to reengage with writing through my blog and in a funny way it changed my life and connection to others. But it also taught me my fragility and that’s a lesson I’m still learning, one day at a time.”

Ultimately however, the lessons you learn will be unique to you. “There is not a single person, story, book, lecture or talk, which will teach us all we need to know to understand the impact of cancer on our lives. That’s what we have to figure out for ourselves when we go through our own cancer experience,” says therapist, Karin Sieger . “Having been diagnosed twice with breast cancer all I can say is try and stay open minded – to your body, the illness, treatment options. You always have choices. Don’t get stuck in fear and don’t get stuck in complacency either. Live your life to the best of your ability and stay true to who you are – with or without cancer.”