Tag Archive for: colonoscopy

Advice From a Young-Onset Colorectal Cancer Patient

Advice From a Young-Onset Colorectal Cancer Patient from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Colorectal cancer patient Jessica was surprised but not shocked even after a diagnosis under the age of 40. Watch as she shares her journey from symptoms, diagnosis, her advice to others, and coping methods she’s found helpful for navigating her experience as a patient.

Special thanks to our partner, Colorectal Cancer Alliance, for helping to make this vignette possible.


Transcript

My name is Jessica, and I’m from Chicago, Illinois. Even though my doctors thought I was too young, I was diagnosed with colorectal cancer at age 39.

I’d been experiencing occasional rectal bleeding for about a year when I was finally referred for a colonoscopy.

While my doctors were convinced that I was too young for colorectal cancer, I was still worried because my grandmother died of the disease.

My doctor asked me to go in to get my colonoscopy results. My parents knew what that meant, so we went together. When the GI gave me the results, stage III rectal cancer, I felt so scared. I called my best friend, and I couldn’t even speak. We just cried together.

After I received my diagnosis, my doctor told me it’s very curable. I had a 2-inch mass in my rear. I had a CT scan to confirm the cancer had not spread followed by an MRI. And that’s when the whirlwind began.

I returned to a craft I hadn’t used much in recent years. To sort my thoughts, to update my friends and family, to document the most important year of my life, I started writing again. Beginning a blog was at once a coping mechanism for me and the best way I knew how to share this breathtaking news with friends and family I’d collected from across the country and over decades — and still conserve energy I would need to fight this fight.

Five years later, and I’m thriving.

I want to raise awareness about the rising incidence of colorectal cancer in the under-40 crowd because I was symptomatic and ignored before I was diagnosed. I know that not everyone is as lucky as me, especially young people who are often diagnosed at an even more advanced stage.

Some of the things I have learned during my colorectal cancer journey are:

  • Watch out for signs your body gives you
  • Don’t take “no” for an answer even if doctors think you’re too young for colorectal cancer.
  • Cases of young-onset colorectal cancer are increasing, and that’s why funding colorectal cancer research is so important.
  • Find something to do to help you cope. If you’re unsure whether it’s a healthy activity, ask your doctor or care team member who you trust.

These actions are key to staying on your path to empowerment.

May 2022 Notable News

This month brings exciting and new information to help with the fight on cancer. As technology improves, knowledge gathered about cancer changes how the medical community views and approaches cancer treatment. Early screening is the key to dramatically reduce colon and rectal cancers in women. There is also a rise in esophageal cancers in middle aged adults, early screening plays a key role in patient outcome.

New Evidence Shows Cancer is not as Heritable as Once Thought

Scientists have found that cause of cancer is not primarily genetic as once thought. There are three causes of cancer: genetic (genome), environmental (exposome), and metabolic (metabolome). As cancer develops and spreads in the body, it creates its own environment and introduces certain metabolites. It becomes a self-fueled disease, reports MedicalXpress.com . Looking at how the cancer grows and survives in the body offers another more specific avenue of treatment for physicians to offer their patients. Simple changes to a patient’s metabolism and lifestyle can change the internal environment and prevent the cancer from growing. Scientists looking at all three causes of cancer opens more options for cancer prevention and treatment. Find more information here.

Starting Colon, Rectal Cancer Screening Earlier Reduces Risk in Women, Study Finds

Starting colon and rectal cancer screening at ages 45 to 49 has resulted in about a 50% reduction in cases of the disease diagnosed in women ages 45 to 60, compared with starting screening at ages 50 to 54 reports, UPINews.comColon and rectal cancers are the third deadliest cancers and there has been rising rates among younger people. In response to the rising rates of occurrence, earlier screening has been encouraged by physicians. The standard procedure for screening is a colonoscopy. During the colonoscopy, the doctor can identify and remove cancerous tumors at an earlier stage and remove polyps that could become cancerous. Find more information here.

Alarming Rise Found in Esophageal Cancer and Barrett’s Esophagus in Middle-Aged Adults

Adults ages 45 to 64 experienced a nearly doubled rate of esophageal cancer and a 50 percent increase in the precancerous condition Barrett’s esophagus between 2012 and 2019 reports MedicalXpress.com . This information has prompted doctors and scientists to look at the causes of this rise, is it due to an increase in screening or is it an actual rise in cancer. Doctors use endoscopy to guide a small camera down the patient’s esophagus, stomach, and duodenum. Esophageal cancer is usually detected in later stages due to minimal symptoms in the early stages. People with elevated risk factors such as chronic acid reflux, male gender, smoking, alcohol consumption, obesity, and Barrett’s esophagus need to get earlier screening. Early screening is the best tool in prevention, often the endoscopy can be done at the same time as the colonoscopy. Find more information here.

Notable News July 2019

So much for the dog days of Summer. July was a super active Notable News month full of information. There are risks and recalls to be aware of, along with some very encouraging news about exciting new research and treatments. So, while you may not want to hear that you should probably consider getting a colonoscopy ASAP, you’ll be relieved to learn that some cancers may have much less invasive diagnostic tools on the horizon. Oh, and there are a couple links to some really interesting (although alarming) longer reads; just in case you’re embracing the dog days, and need some reading material, this summer.

Increased Cancer Risk

Colon cancer is on the rise for people younger than 50, reports cbsnews.com. The rate has increased over the past decade from 10 percent of all cases to about 12 percent. While there is no concrete explanation as to why colon cancer is increasing among the younger age group, one possibility is that it is linked to modern diets and the gut microbiome. Conversely, colon cancer rates are declining among those 50 and older, largely because of colonoscopy screenings which detect polyps before they become cancerous. Find out more below.

Breast implants that have been linked to cancer are being recalled, according to nytimes.com. The textured implants were banned in Europe late last year and are now being recalled in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The implants are linked to anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. It is a rare cancer of the immune system that develops in the tissue around the implant. Removing the implant and scar tissue around it is effective in curing the cancer in most cases, but if it is not found early it can spread and be deadly. Symptoms are swelling and fluid around the implant, and patients should have symptoms checked by their doctor. More information about the implants can be found below.

There is a link between radioactive iodine (RAI) treatment and cancer deaths, says cancer.gov. RAI has been commonly used to treat hyperthyroidism since the 1940s. An association between the dose of RAI treatment and long-term risk of death from cancers, including breast cancer, has been found in a study led by researchers at the National Cancer Institute. More research is needed to better understand the risks and the benefits of the treatments, but in the meantime, the information will help patients discuss hyperthyroid treatment options with their doctors. More information about the research can be found below.

Treatment and Detection

Immunotherapy may work in treating brain cancer, says medicalxpress.com. Researchers have found a way to make the CAR T immune therapy more effective against glioblastoma, the most common and most deadly form of brain cancer. Previous research showed that not all of the tumors could be targeted by the T cells. So, in order to more strategically target the tumors, researchers used a bi-specific T-cell engager, or “BiTE”, that makes it possible for CAR T cancer-killing cells to be sent to specific targets, making the treatment more effective. Learn more about the complicated, but promising, process below.

There may be a better, non-invasive way to detect bladder cancer, reports medicalnewstoday.com. Researchers in Spain have proposed using electronic tongues. The devices can detect or “taste” soluble compounds by using software and sensors. The tongues, used to analyze food, water, wine, and explosives, can also be used to detect diseases by testing samples of biofluid. Using the tongues to test urine samples could be an easy and inexpensive way to detect bladder cancer in the early stages. Learn more about the proposed tongue testing below.

Researchers may have found a new way to treat ovarian cancer, according to medicalnewstoday.com. Researchers have identified an enzyme known as IDH1 that encourages the growth of high-grade serous ovarian cancer, the most common form of ovarian cancer. The cancer is difficult to detect in early stages and hard to treat because it often develops a resistance to chemotherapy. Researchers found that when they blocked the IDH1 enzyme, the cancer cells were unable to divide and grow. The research also suggests that blocking the enzyme works on the cancer cells that have spread to other parts of the body as well as where the cancer originated. More information about this encouraging research can be found below.

Cancer-Causing Toxins

If you’ve never heard of ethylene oxide, you might want to consider reading the article ‘Residents Unaware of Cancer-Causing Toxins in Air’ from webmd.com. Ethylene oxide is an invisible chemical with no noticeable odor. It is used to sterilize medical equipment and make antifreeze, and it is on the EPA’s list of chemicals that definitely cause cancer. It is also an airborne toxin in areas that have been flagged as high-cancer risk, but many of the residents of those areas have no idea they are being exposed.

Another article worth reading this month can be found at huffpost.com. A new plastics plant is planning to come to an area in the middle of Louisiana’s “Cancer Alley”, and the residents, tired of cancer-causing chemical pollutants, are fighting back. Read about their path to empowerment below.


Resource Links:

cbsnews.com

Colon Cancer Study Finds Colon Cancer Rates Rising for Patients Under 50

nytimes.com

Breast Implants Linked to Rare Cancer Are Recalled Worldwide

cancer.gov

NCI study finds long-term increased risk of cancer death following common treatment for hyperthyroidism

medicalxpress.com

Immune therapy takes a ‘BiTE’ out of brain cancer

medicalnewstoday.com

‘Electronic tongues’ may help diagnose early stage bladder cancer

Could targeting this enzyme halt ovarian cancer?

webmd.com

Residents Unaware of Cancer-Causing Toxin in Air

huffpost.com

A Community In America’s ‘Cancer Alley’ Fights For Its Life Against A Plastics Plant