Tag Archive for: electronic medical record

How Can Information Disparities on Emerging Therapies Be Addressed?

How Can Information Disparities on Emerging Therapies Be Addressed? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

How can gaps in information about emerging myeloma therapies be reduced? Expert Dr. Sikander Ailawadhi from Mayo Clinic discusses some demographic characteristics of information disparities and advice for myeloma experts and patient advocates to help bridge  information gaps.

[ACT]IVATION TIP

“…I would highly encourage all my fellow clinicians, educators, researchers, and myeloma academicians to please consider developing some of these thresholds in your clinics so that if a patient is even able to come through the door and sees you, they are able to gain access to resources, or you’re able to bring together higher amount of resources specifically for that patient’s needs.”

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Transcript:

Lisa Hatfield:

Recent studies have identified demographic characteristics such as higher education, residency in certain regions, and urban or suburban living as factors influencing awareness and understanding of novel myeloma treatments. How can healthcare organizations tailor educational initiatives to reach underserved populations and address these disparities in access to information and understanding of emerging therapies?

Dr. Sikander Ailawadhi:

Lisa, this is a very interesting and important question. And as you were pointing out, studies that are talking about education level residency in certain geographical regions or urban/suburban areas, and that may be affecting the patient’s understanding and awareness of novel myeloma treatments. I kind of smile a little bit because one of those studies is ours that we conducted in about close to 2,300, 2,400 patients where we surveyed patients about CAR T-cell therapy and bispecific antibodies.

And what we found out is that there were a lot of differences. Patients with higher education where their information was closer to the correct information. I mean, there are sometimes gaps everywhere, but the patients with lower education in certain parts of the country or who identify as being from a rural area, they tend to have many more gaps and misconceptions about treatments.

So, while it was a novel finding, I wasn’t really surprised in seeing that. Because historically, our patients who are in rural areas, who are lower income or lower education strata, they tend to be underserved and underrepresented and just underserved. So what we’re trying our best to do is when we create the education initiatives, we are trying to, one, disseminate it across the board. So for example, studies like this, study gives results. We are working on writing the manuscript and publishing it so that anybody and everybody can read that and find out and say, “Oh, you know what, this is something that the people over at Mayo Clinic in their study found. Most likely it is applicable to us also.

So either we should look for that finding, or we should just try to mitigate it. We should just work on it.” So developing the education material and spreading it far and wide, we are strongly considering also that the results of these studies should be shared with our patients. Why not? I mean, forums like this or even for that matter, our other support group programs and other education initiatives, we are trying to disseminate these study results with the patients because they need to know about it.

And then when we are…as you rightly asked, how are we tailoring these education initiatives? I think the idea is we are trying to disseminate it far and wide. We are also trying to share it with institutions that may have a larger catchment population of these underserved groups. And then when we are putting together these initiatives, these education initiatives…or I should say, from a different standpoint, when patients come to our institution, we have certain triggers that we have set up.

So if somebody is African American or Hispanic, or if somebody in the EMR, in the electronic medical record system, has identified themselves coming from a rural area background, or if somebody has what’s called certain social determinants of health that are captured by the electronic medical record, and if they have some flags there, I think my threshold of getting a social work consult for that person or providing extra education material, that threshold goes down. We have that set up in our clinics.

So certain characteristics will qualify the patient to be able to access more information just because we feel that that is the group that tends to be traditionally underserved. So my activation tip for this question is, while we will try our best to provide information as far and wide as possible, I would highly encourage all my fellow clinicians, educators, researchers, and myeloma academicians to please consider developing some of these thresholds in your clinics so that if a patient is even able to come through the door and sees you, they are able to gain access to resources, or you’re able to bring together higher amount of resources specifically for that patient’s needs.


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Is Technology Accelerating Progress in Myeloproliferative Neoplasm Care?

Is Technology Accelerating Progress in Myeloproliferative Neoplasm Care? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Is myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) care being advanced by technology progress? Expert Dr. Krisstina Gowin from University of Arizona Cancer Center discusses how MPN care has benefited from technology advances and explains two MPN technology tools and how they assist in MPN patient care.

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Transcript:

Lisa Hatfield: 

So, Dr. Gowin, a couple of questions for you. Is technology playing a role in accelerating progress in MPN care?

Dr. Krisstina Gowin: 

Oh, absolutely. And I think some of the ways that it really accelerates progress is pulling us together. So what we need to recognize is that myeloproliferative neoplasms truly is a rare disease, and we just celebrated Rare Disease Day. But there’s a lot of challenge in treating patients and progressing the field forward in rare diseases because you can’t do the big clinical trials. It’s hard to come together because everything’s siloed, and there’s just a couple patients here, a couple patients there in each practice. But with digital health and clinical trials that are offered on a digital platform, it pulls the nation together and even the world together. And we’ve seen that. I’ve done an international survey-based analysis and I had 858 MPN patients from 52 countries participate in that survey. And so that just shows how it pulls the world together. And for the web app that we just discussed, we had 93 patients say they were interested within three weeks, and within actually a week, we identified them all and then took three weeks to actually accrue them to the trial. So it really speaks to A, how MPN patients are digitally engaged and excited about these kinds of platforms. And then B, how effective it really can be to pull the groups together.

So yes, I think it’s…and that’s really how we’re going to get progress is through these kind of interventions with a rare disease. And I hope it’s okay if we jump back to something you said, Dr. Lopez, which is, I think telemedicine is so so important to bring everyone together. And in particular, I see that on the transplant ward. And so in myelofibrosis, that’s the only curative therapy. And so many myelofibrosis patients actually go through allogeneic stem cell transplantation. And my goodness, that is a socially isolating experience. Patients are in the hospital, not uncommonly for at least 30 days and then have to be near their transplant center for three months, which often is away from home. So to pull in their support system, both through the acuity of the transplant themselves and then the couple of months after is so crucial to a successful transplantation. And I think through FaceTime and also the MPN support groups, which is very robust, the patient advocacy and the way the MPN network sticks together on a digital platform, I think is really unique and offers unique support.

Lisa Hatfield: 

Thank you. And then what role does technology play in the disease symptom management, and in particular, in clinical trials too. What role does technology play with clinical trials?

Dr. Krisstina Gowin: 

Well, I think it helps us through different, clinical trial accrual patterns, we can see who’s eligible where, so it helps us identify patients. It helps us to, understand the different kind of precision-based medicine approaches so we can start to pool the data, say for, particular mutations… ASXL1 mutations. And so it helps us in the precision medicine aspect of clinical trials and now we’re looking at symptom management and how do we really integrate that. So large survivorship platforms like Carevive, if you’ve ever heard of Carevive, is now integrating our validated symptom assessment form into the Carevive platform. So now we can really collect that data and use that to mine it for potential kind of retrospective analysis. So it’s helpful for clinical trials as well as for our clinicians and clinics to really identify changes in symptom burden.

And just as Dr. Lopez was mentioning, that we can track these over time and it can flag and say, “Oh, your symptoms are changing, they’re increasing over time,” and maybe we need to be thinking about that. And so Carevive is really kind of an electronic medical record driven it’s really a healthcare driven platform, but now there’s patient ones too. And I just learned about this two weeks ago, I was at an MPN conference in Phoenix and learned about MPN Genie. And so MPN Genie apparently, is tracking…patients are putting their symptoms in and that’s shooting that information to the electronic medical record to their doctors. And so I think that’s fantastic, ’cause, we now get that information real time and we can change our clinical management, maybe bring that patient in sooner, maybe do a bone marrow earlier. We never would’ve identified that if it weren’t for those kind of digital engagements, so I think it’s a really exciting time. And I think we’re going to see more and more of these new platforms and ways for, different EMRs and smartphones to be communicating back and forth between patients and providers. 


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How Can Lung Cancer Physician-Patient Communication Be Improved?

How Can Lung Cancer Physician-Patient Communication Be Improved? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Lung cancer physician-patient communication can sometimes present challenges. Experts Dr. Lyudmila Bazhenova and Dr. Jessica Bauman share factors that can create challenges and methods they’ve used to improve their communication and patient care.

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Transcript:

Dr. Nicole Rochester: 

Can you each share some examples from your own practice around improving physician-patient communication that may serve as exemplary for providers that are watching this program? And we’ll start with you, Dr. Bazhenova.

Dr. Lyudmila Bazhenova: 

I think it also has some challenges, because in the current environment of practicing medicine, we are, as physicians, we are pushed to see more patients, it’s all about productivity. So when you do that, something has to give. And a time that we can spend with the patient is limited. And I think it’s important, for myself, as a practice, I have the same, I call it spiel that I give to all my patients. It’s the same picture I write down when I speak and I give that paper to the patients. I’ve had, you know, created some preprinted things that I used to give to the patients. Don’t do it anymore. But I think that’s another thing, have some kind of information that is a patient level that I can give to the patients.

And I think we have to educate the patients as well, either by ourselves or using the platforms that we are exhibiting here, that is outside of our primary institutions. And to make sure that the patients are aware that each one of them who have a stage IV lung cancer, as well as early stage lung cancer needs to be tested for the molecular testing. And kind of put it also have the patient question the physician, did you do that? Was that test done? That’s one part of information.  And I think the second part is, we do have to do better in allowing our patients to get a faster access to us. And we kind of accept the fact that we are going to be working after hours. When the clinic is over, that’s where I’m going to go to my charts, and I’m going to answer my patient’s question.

It’s kind of an intrinsic, is the work of the physician. Hours is…unfortunately, doesn’t really count. There is no limit to that. So whatever it works, like having a nurse educator. We have in our institution, we have…we call her tissue coordinator, but she’s the person who can actually make sure that the tissue is done, she can also make sure that reports are sent to the patient and make sure that patient has ability to ask questions of somebody. And I think the EMR, electronic medical record, it’s kind of a love-hate relationship, I think, with all of us. But one thing that I find it made it much easier for me is to communicate with my patients using my chart and this ability to release the result to the patient by one click of a button, that saves time for me so I can spend that time to actually visit the patient and explain to the patient what needs to be done.

Dr. Nicole Rochster: 

That is awesome, thank you. Do you have anything to add, Dr. Bauman?

Dr. Jessica Bauman: 

Yes, yes, I agree that I think that this overall requires a lot of education, and especially when patients come in and they want to know tomorrow or yesterday, actually, what they’re going to get for treatment and what we’re going to start with. And so telling them that actually we still can’t decide for at least another week or two, that in of itself can be challenging. I think the other piece of this that’s always important is, in general, when we’re doing molecular and biomarker testing, we’re looking for changes in the tumor, we’re looking for what we call somatic mutations, but there is also the second concern where on rare occasion, issues with molecular testing can bring up issues with germline testing, meaning some abnormality that’s found that may impact their own familial risk for cancer, and so that of course requires a lot of thought and careful education as well, in addition to the treatment decision-making that we’re really ordering the test to decide upon.


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