Tag Archive for: lung cancer clinical trials

Advancements in Lung Cancer Clinical Trials | Updates for Veterans

Advancements in Lung Cancer Clinical Trials: Updates for Veterans from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

How can veterans help move lung cancer clinical trial advancements forward? Expert Dr. Drew Moghanaki from UCLA Health explains clinical trial groups that need more participants, available support resources for veterans, and patient advice. 

[ACT]IVATION TIP

“…speak up and ask if there is a clinical trial that you may be eligible for to help another veteran. And, of course, when you enroll in a trial, you’ll be getting basically the best treatments that we think are available at this time.”

Download Resource Guide | Descargar guía de recursos

See More from [ACT]IVATED NSCLC Veterans

Related Resources:

Combating Disparities | Veterans' Healthcare Access and Quality

Combating Disparities: Veterans’ Healthcare Access and Quality

Are There Lung Cancer Outcome Disparities for Veterans?

Are There Lung Cancer Outcome Disparities for Veterans?

Veteran Lung Cancer Risk | Understanding Exposures and Screening Protocols

Veteran Lung Cancer Risk | Understanding Exposures and Screening Protocols

Transcript:

Lisa Hatfield:

Dr. Moghanaki, can you speak to ongoing clinical trials and research specifically for veterans? And are there any clinical trials or research studies available that focus on lung cancer treatments specifically tailored to veterans from underrepresented communities?

Dr. Drew Moghanaki:

Yeah. So we want to focus on the people we care about the most, which for many of us are veterans, but at the end of the day, partnering nationally and globally in clinical trials is probably the best thing that we can do. We don’t really think that the lung cancer is…that our veterans are dealing with is necessarily different than what a civilian may be. So by partnering, we have bigger scale to tackle these problems and get these studies done as quickly as possible.

When it comes to underserved communities, same thing. We do the VA and VA researchers definitely make a point of trying to get more underrepresented communities access to clinical trials. But again, we just usually geographic challenges are our biggest barrier. Someone wants to live in this beautiful part of the country up in a mountainside near a lake, but they’re two-and-a-half hours away from a city. That can be challenging for us.

But the good news is that the VA does provide a lot of housing. So for those veterans who live far away, if they want to come, we’ll take care of them. We’ll provide, if they’re eligible for your VA healthcare, we’ll provide them housing. We can even provide them with their meals. And so, and get them access to the best care. So basically my activation tip here is to be aware that clinical trials are really critical.

It’s how we’ve moved forward. It’s a tremendous opportunity to help other veterans behind themselves who will get lung cancer in the future. There’s nothing we can do at this time to stop the number of people getting lung cancer. And so the more research we can do, the better this world can be. And my activation tip is to speak up and ask if there is a clinical trial that you may be eligible for to help another veteran. And, of course, when you enroll in a trial, you’ll be getting basically the best treatments that we think are available at this time.

 

Lisa Hatfield: Great. Thank you. Thank you so much. Those activation tips were really great and patient-centered. And I think that’s what, at least me as a patient, watching that in the audience, that’s what I want to hear is what can I do to help advocate for myself? So thank you for those responses.

 


Share Your Feedback

Create your own user feedback survey

Understanding Currently Available Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatments

Understanding Currently Available Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatments from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

What options are available to treat non-small cell lung cancer? Dr. Erin Schenk, a lung cancer specialist and researcher, defines personalized medicine for the audience and discusses lung cancer treatment options, including clinical trials.

Dr. Erin Schenk is a medical oncologist, lung cancer researcher, and assistant professor in the division of medical oncology at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Center. Learn more about Dr. Schenk.

See More From INSIST! Lung Cancer

Related Resources:

An Expert Explains Predictive Biomarker Testing for Lung Cancer

An Expert Explains Predictive Biomarker Testing for Lung Cancer

Advances in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Testing

Advances in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Testing

Personalized Lung Cancer Treatment | Key Factors to Consider

Personalized Lung Cancer Treatment | Key Factors to Consider


Transcript:

Katherine Banwell:

We’re hearing the term personalized medicine a lot these days. Would you define the term for our audience? 

Dr. Erin Schenk:

Absolutely, and I think the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer is one of the poster childs for children – for personalized medicine because based on the result of the biomarker testing that’s what drives my choice of therapy because the biomarkers help to tell me what is this cancer most likely to be vulnerable to and that in my mind that’s a wonderful application of the promise of personalized medicine.   

Katherine Banwell:

Okay. Let’s move on to treatment now, Dr. Schenk. Would you walk us through the current treatments being used to treat non-small cell lung cancer?  

Dr. Erin Schenk:

Absolutely, and there are a broad range of options, and thankfully we have so many choices in how to best help patients. And it’s often why visiting with a center that sees a lot of patients with lung cancer can be beneficial so that you have all of the parties at the table that need to be there as we’re making these treatment decisions. So, I would start thinking about patients with early-stage disease. Often surgery if tumors are small enough and there’s not you know, no lymph nodes are involved with the cancer and it’s not anywhere else.  

Sometimes surgery is all that patients might need in terms of their treatment. Those are for patients with smaller tumors and really early-stage disease. As we move forward in the stages, meaning going from stage one to stage two, so a little bit bigger of a tumor, lymph nodes might be involved.   

That’s when really the multi-disciplinary approach happens, and what I mean by that is for example, at my institution where people like me, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, and surgeons all sit down together to talk about a patient, their scans, you know, what is their health status, what is their biomarker testing, to try to come together to form a treatment approach. And so, at our institution, you know, frequently in stage two to stage three tumors based on biomarker testing we either select upfront surgery followed by chemotherapy followed by sometimes targeted therapies or TKIs.   

Those are the medicines, the TKI, those are the medicines that are really dependent on the presence of biomarker testing. So, the biomarkers often tell us for example if there’s an EGFR mutation. If that’s present then I would use an EGFR TKI, for example. 

But if those biomarkers don’t show an alteration where I have TKI to use, then we frequently are giving patients chemotherapy plus immunotherapy before surgery. This approach is called a neoadjuvant chemoimmunotherapy approach, and it’s one of the newer changes to lung cancer care within the past year that I think really is going to have a positive impact on outcomes for patients with lung cancer.  

So, just again in broad strokes, and then as we move into stage three patients where we can’t resect the tumor, that’s where we give chemotherapy medicines plus radiation therapy. Oftentimes followed by immunotherapy and then when patients have disease that spread outside of the chest, outside of the lungs, the metastatic setting or stage IV, that’s when we think about the whole host of therapies available through medical oncology, systemic therapies is another way to call them.  

And there we think about immunotherapy-based treatments plus or minus chemotherapy or we think about targeted therapy-based approaches with those TKIs. And again, it’s all based on those molecular markers, those biomarkers. 

Katherine Banwell:

Do clinical trials play a role in lung cancer treatment? 

Dr. Erin Schenk:

Clinical trials are incredibly important for the treatment of lung cancer. These are the tests and the procedures that we do that have continuously advanced our ability to care for patients with lung cancer. You know, it was clinical trial data that helped us get alerted to doing chemotherapy and immunotherapy before surgery really can help patients do better. And similarly, clinical trials have helped us define when do we use TKIs or targeted therapies. 

So, I think that’s another great question to ask your team of, “Based on all of the information you know about me and my cancer are there clinical trials options that are available here where I’m at or ones that are really interesting or appealing elsewhere that might be worthwhile for me to consider?” So, clinical trials are a critical part of how we help patients do better.  

Expert Advice for Lung Cancer Patients Considering a Clinical Trial

Expert Advice for Lung Cancer Patients Considering a Clinical Trial from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo

What do lung cancer patients need to know about clinical trials? Dr. Lecia Sequist shares her perspective about the benefits of clinical trials, common misconceptions about trials, and advice to patients considering clinical trials.

Dr. Sequist is program director of Cancer Early Detection & Diagnostics at Massachusetts General Hospital and also The Landry Family Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.

[ACT]IVATION TIP:

“…ask your doctor if you should go to another center, maybe in a bigger town or city, to ask about clinical trials there? And that’s a great reason to have a second opinion. Sometimes the latest, most active treatments are only available on a clinical trial.”

Download Resource Guide

Download Resource Guide en español

See More from [ACT]IVATED NSCLC

Related Resources:

How Do You Break Down Lung Cancer Diagnosis to New Patients

How Do You Break Down Lung Cancer Diagnosis to New Patients

Exciting Lung Cancer Data and Studies_ A Look At Neoadjuvant Treatment

Exciting Lung Cancer Data and Studies: A Look At Neoadjuvant Treatment

Do Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines Differ for Certain Populations

Do Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines Differ for Certain Populations


Transcript:

Lisa Hatfield:

Dr. Sequist, why is clinical trial participation so important in lung cancer, and what advice do you have for patients who are considering a clinical trial, and especially as they’re thinking about access to that clinical trial, how can they access those trials?

Dr. Lecia Sequist:

Clinical trials can come in all flavors, in different shapes and sizes. And so it is…I think clinical trials are very important for the field of cancer, they’re how we move the field forward. When scientists invent a new treatment, it can’t come to your door step unless there are clinical trials that are done to show that it works in cancer, that it’s safe, that it’s better than the older treatments. And so clinical trials are critical to cancer treatment and the progress of cancer treatment. I think a lot of people understand that, but they also think, Well, they’re really important, but someone else can do them. I don’t want to participate in a clinical trial, I don’t want to be experimented on, I don’t want to be a lab rat. And I can definitely understand that fear. But clinical trials, again, like I said, they come in all shapes and sizes, some of them are more experimental where maybe you’re getting a drug that hasn’t been tried in that many people before, some of them are less experimental where maybe there’s a drug that’s approved and works really, really well in breast cancer. It hasn’t come to lung cancer yet because it needs a clinical trial. And you can access that treatment before everyone else if you participate in the clinical trial.

Clinical trials are not for everyone, but I think that in my opinion, most patients who are diagnosed with cancer should hear about clinical trials, should learn a little bit more about what they really mean, and then they can decide for themselves if it is something that they would like to take part in. Clinical trials aren’t available at every hospital or every clinic, that’s the other thing, is that they may not offer clinical trials where you’re being treated, but you can…

I think my activation tips around clinical trials are, one, to learn more about it because most of us don’t know that much about clinical trials. And you can start by asking your doctor, but it’s possible your doctor doesn’t know that much about clinical trials either if clinical trials aren’t done or offered at your hospital or your clinic. And so you can ask your doctor if you should go to another center, maybe in a bigger town or city, to ask about clinical trials there? And that’s a great reason to have a second opinion. Sometimes the latest, most active treatments are only available on a clinical trial. So I think another misconception people have is that, well, that’s for when everything else has been tried, it’s like the last-ditch effort. That’s definitely not true. Sometimes the best treatments that we would love to give a patient first when they’re first diagnosed, because we think it has the highest chance of working, but it’s only available on a clinical trial. So it’s not something to think about only after you’ve tried five or six other things. Clinical trials should be considered, I think for every cancer patient from day one. They may not be a good fit for every patient, but they should at least be talked about and thought about, so we can really find the best plan for you. 


Share Your Feedback:

Create your own user feedback survey

What Procedures Are in Place to Protect Lung Cancer Clinical Trial Participants?

What Procedures Are in Place to Protect Lung Cancer Clinical Trial Participants? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

What safety measures are in place to protect people in lung cancer clinical trials? Dr. Grace Dy reviews protocols to help maintain clinical trial safety.

Dr. Grace Dy is Chief of Thoracic Oncology and Professor of Oncology in the Department of Medicine at Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center in Buffalo, New York. Learn more about Dr. Grace Dy.

See More From Lung Cancer Clinical Trials 201

Related Resources:

Lung Cancer Clinical Trials | Addressing Common Patient Concerns

Questions to Ask Before Participating in a Lung Cancer Clinical Trial

When to Consider a Clinical Trial for Lung Cancer Treatment?


Transcript:

Katherine Banwell:

What safety measures are in place to safeguard patients?  

Dr. Grace Dy:

So, there’s a lot of safety measures involved. Not just within the protocol but there are also governing committees. IRB, Scientific Review committees, that look over – and these committees typically also, actually, involve some patient advocates that will be reviewing the protocols to make sure it’s not just a scientific aspect that is looked into but also patient perspectives that are looked into when we review these protocols.  

So, from the medical perspective, protocols are generally written with guidelines to help treating doctors how to manage side effects. For example, because of the intense preparation – what we call pre-clinical, meaning the preparation done in animal models, in learning from other settings, for example; from other drugs, for example. If it’s not the first in class, you have a sense of what potential side-effects might be expected and so you prepare accordingly. 

How Can Specific Biomarkers Impact Lung Cancer Progression?

How Can Specific Biomarkers Impact Lung Cancer Progression? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Lung cancer progression can be aided by monitoring of biomarkers, but what do they indicate? Expert Dr. Christian Rolfo from Mount Sinai explains biomarker characteristics that help monitor disease progression and how clinical trials help in treatment advances.

See More from Best Lung Cancer Care

Related Resource:

How Do Lung Cancer Patients Benefit From MRD Testing?

How Can Biomarkers Help With Lung Cancer Treatment?

What Are the Latest Lung Cancer Treatment Updates?


Transcript:

Dr. Nicole Rochester:

So with regard to the biomarkers, you mentioned that these are kind of unevenly distributed among different populations depending on your origin, and so how does that play into the progression of the disease, what do we know about why patients with specific biomarkers have a different degree of disease progression?

Dr. Christian Rolfo:

Yeah, so we know more or less that the characteristics, I mean more or less in terms of the evolution of the clinical characteristics of these patients, in terms of organ affection in case of progression, but what is most important of this is that we are able to continue to identify, and I say monitoring these patients with liquid biopsy, for example, this is a good tool to understand or to understand it a bit better, which kind of mechanistic involvement. 

So because we have, for example, patients who were receiving the case that I was discussing before EGFR mutations and they received one graft from the very beginning, a third-generation TKI is the one that is approved for the first line, and this patient has a progression. The possibility to have a mechanism of resistance is different, so we can have mutations that are coming in the same pathway, so in the same area, same kind of mutation, but different location, just to the people understand is the kind of line and we have the mutation that is here, the one that we are attacking, but we have another mutation that is in this area, and it’s not covered by the track that is covering this mutation. 

So we have nowadays drugs that are going to, in this area in clinical trials, or we have in other cases other areas of the task of mutations that have nothing to do with the original one. So we are activating another kind of pathway, or we are transforming the tumor from one kind of tumor to another kind of tumor, so for this reason, identify which kind of mechanism of resistance is in place can have an important or have important implications for how we are treating these patients,  so we need to look at that to treat the patients.

Dr. Nicole Rochester: Wonderful. And speaking of resistance, we know that there are some patients who end up trying multiple therapies in order to treat their lung cancer, are there alternative treatment strategies for lung cancer patients who have failed all therapies? 

Dr. Christian Rolfo: 

Yeah, absolutely, we have research in lung cancer is never stopping in oncology generally, but in lung cancer it’s really exciting to see how this research is evolving, and it’s arriving to the patients the meaning of the research when we are doing access to the patients, to the discovery of the finding that we have, and obviously, we have strategies in the clinical practice, but also we have the clinical trials. So clinical trials, and that is something we need to try to define very well because some patients believe that when we are going to clinical trials there are no more options or we don’t have any other options to do. 

We are sometimes using clinical trials even in the first line, so even in patients that are for the first time being treated. Because we know that some of the cases we are treating patients with from some standard of care and using drugs on top, we want to explore it, we can improve these outcomes that we already know. That could be also a clinical trial, that is also a clinical trial. So don’t take the participation in a clinical trial as the last option that you have, sometimes you will go to your doctor and the first time that you see a doctor for your first diagnosis, they can propose a clinical trial. 

And this is really valuable. What we really appreciate is the collaboration of the patients to be in clinical trials, because we need to remember that the drugs that we are using today were analyzing other patients before, so the treatment that you are receiving in a standard of care today were before a clinical trial, it’s really important how we can interact with the research and the clinical practice very easily, so we have also some options that are…for what we call early drug development, that there are some drugs that are in patients who are receiving the standard of care, and they have the opportunity to be treated in new drugs, and you can discuss…believe me there, and 

I know that there is a lot of questions about clinical trials but the clinical trial setting is really restrictive, it’s very well-coordinated, so you would be part of a very coordinated and structured things that they try to protect the patients in the first instance, and try to understand also how we can help the patients and the future generations. So that is really why we appreciate patients that the contribution of patients that are giving to this clinical research because it’s helping to advance the knowledge for the new patients as well.

Dr. Nicole Rochester: 

And I really appreciate how you described clinical trials, and particularly your distinction about it’s not always this last ditch effort that sometimes you all are using clinical trials as first-line therapy. One of the common things is that clinical trials are tomorrow’s medicine today, and helping patients and families to understand that there’s value in being involved in clinical trials and that…and I think with COVID there’s a little more understanding, but certainly, we have a long way to go, and so I appreciate you sharing that. Do you have any specific examples of patients in your practice, and not names, of course, but examples of…that have benefited from clinical trials?

Dr. Christian Rolfo: 

Absolutely, we have several of examples, and actually FDA was doing a terrific job in the last year to try to get access quickly access to the drugs for patients, and some of this access that was granted was based in clinical trials that we’re starting for a Phase I or Phase II trials, owe are really doing a very rapid evolution of the drug development, and this is a revolution actually of the drug development because we have access very quickly. I can tell you that it was certainly in my career, several patients in clinical trials that they got benefits. Obviously, clinical trials are answering questions, so that is the way that we can answer questions scientifically and is the only way that we can advance in clinical therapeutics. 

Lung Cancer Advocate Shares How to Optimize Your Telemedicine Visit

Lung Cancer Advocate Shares How to Optimize Your Telemedicine Visit from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

How can lung cancer patients optimize their telemedicine visits? Watch as lung cancer patient Jill shares her top tips for how to prepare for virtual visits and how to advocate for yourself when communicating for optimal care.

See More From Lung Cancer TelemEDucation

Download Guide

Related Programs:

 
Lung Cancer Patient Shares Why Telemedicine Is an Important Tool

Understanding Telemedicine Pros and Cons for Lung Cancer Patients

Lung Cancer Patient Shares Why Telemedicine Should Be a Long-Term Tool

Lung Cancer Patient Shares Why Telemedicine Should Be a Long-Term Tool

 

Transcript:

Jill:

One thing that someone else recently mentioned to me is to be patient with the doctor who might be late, and I don’t mind actually, the doctor’s late or early. I’ve had a doctor be up to half an hour early or up to an hour late, and that doesn’t bother me, I just go on living life and doing other things while I wait for the call, but I do book a bigger chunk of time on my calendar with the expectation that doctors are really busy people and they can’t always predict how long something else will go or what would come up, so it’s good to be understanding about it for sure. 

It’s also helpful for me and a lot of people to write a list of questions, symptoms, and make sure that you get them all answered, so write them down and actually check them off, or cross them off while you’re in the appointment, because you don’t wanna walk away from there thinking, oh shoot, there was that one big question I had and some doctors are okay with getting an email or something between appointments, and some nurses are great to call, but not everyone has that opportunity. 

So, I would say, make the most of your appointment just like you would in-person. Take good care to make sure that you’re advocating for yourself, and if the doctor says words after you ask your cost your question, you don’t feel like you understood them. Don’t be embarrassed or afraid or anything… just ask again, ask for clarification. Sometimes these doctors talk in big words, and my doctor has been great, my oncologist he would like draw pictures and I ask him often to write words down for me if I don’t know how to spell them because why would I know how to spell that? I don’t have a medical and oncology degree, so there’s no shame in asking questions, asking questions is smart, and it helps make us better informed, and it’s true that a better informed and a better-informed patient is a more empowered patient, and we tend to have better outcomes, when we know what’s going on in our treatment, so take the time to ask your questions.

_____________________________________________________________________________

Lung Cancer Patient Shares Top Tips for Utilizing Telemedicine

Lung Cancer Patient Shares Top Tips for Utilizing Telemedicine from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Stage IV lung cancer survivor and nurse Gina has taken advantage of telemedicine opportunities in her care. Watch as she shares her perspective about the benefits of telemedicine and her hopes for the future. In Gina’s words, “..no matter where they are in the world, I don’t think that where you live should determine if you live, I think everyone should have access to the very best care…”

See More From Lung Cancer TelemEDucation

Download Guide

Related Programs:

 
Lung Cancer Patient Shares Why Telemedicine Is an Important Tool

Understanding Telemedicine Pros and Cons for Lung Cancer Patients

Lung Cancer Patient Shares Why Telemedicine Should Be a Long-Term Tool

Lung Cancer Patient Shares Why Telemedicine Should Be a Long-Term Tool

 

Transcript:

Gina:

When it comes to telemedicine, I think that we have to think of it as an adjunct to care, so it wouldn’t replace your actual care with your doctor, and so I think that utilizing telemedicine would really just be kind of like getting a second opinion, getting somebody else to look at your case, and it would have been an opportunity really for you and your community doctor to work with an expert in the field, wherever, whatever disease state you’re being treated it with, and I think that’s one of the silver linings of COVID that we can use, so it wouldn’t necessarily be that telemedicine is taking over your care, but it’s really just an adjunct to your care. So, you would still be touched by your doctor, you still would be assessed by your community doctor, but that community doctor would be leaning on the expertise of the doctor in which you’re getting a second opinion or you’re consulting with…so I think that’s the way that we have to think of telemedicine and diversifying and really making sure that everybody has access to the best care, it’s not really in placement of your normal care, but just an adjunct, so in addition to your care. 

One thing that I really hope that we can benefit from is…I hope that we can really learn from COVID. We learned that really there is a disease that is not defined by borders, and so I hope that we can use the opportunities and the things the way that we were, so I guess we persevered in spite of a disease, I hope we can use that for clinical trials to and so what I mean by that is I feel like the silver lining of COVID was telemedicine, and we were able to provide telemedicine to patients no matter where they were, no matter how they felt, they were able to have the best of the best care right in the comfort of their own home. And so one of the things that I actually personally benefited from was because of COVID, telemedicine was open up everywhere, and so I was able to actually get care from some of the best ALK cancer experts in Boston through telemedicine, and so I wasn’t actually required to travel to Boston instead, I could meet with that doctor by Zoom, and sadly, once the COVID mandates were lifted, that hospital was no longer providing telemedicine, so I was getting this great care, this expert advice in my disease process, and all of a sudden it was stopped, and so I hope that one of the things that we can do is figure out ways to utilize telemedicine to really bring the best care to patients no matter where they are in the United States or really…no matter where they are in the world, I don’t think that where you live should determine if you live, I think everyone should have access to the very best care, and I think it can be delivered through telemedicine.

Lung Cancer: Gina’s Clinical Trial Profile

Lung Cancer: Gina’s Clinical Trial Profile from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Lung cancer survivor Gina was shocked after receiving her diagnosis at age 38. Watch as she shares her lung cancer journey including her diagnosis, treatment, clinical trial experience, and advice to other patients. In Gina’s words, “So what I’ve learned is that clinical trials are really the best and newest care for patients, and I feel like all patients should have access and have the experience of a clinical trial.”

Patient-to-Patient Diverse Lung Cancer Clinical Trial Profiles

Transcript:

Gina:

My lung cancer story is probably not that unique. There are actually a lot of people that are just like me. I was 38 years old, a nurse at the peak of my physical health, and I was actually training for a triathlon. And I just developed a cough, and no one would take me seriously. As a nurse, I felt like something was wrong because I was losing weight, and I wasn’t trying, and eventually I had to self-pay for a chest X-ray, and the chest X-ray showed that I had something going on in my left lung, but they weren’t really sure what it was. So, I took that chest X-ray to the emergency room for exactly what they tell you not to — a cough, and thankfully, the ER doctor took me very seriously and finally that led to a stage IV incurable, inoperable lung cancer diagnosis. As a nurse, I knew the severity of, of the diagnosis, and I knew that also there was a possibility for some new drugs, and so I’m so thankful that my doctor in Memphis knew to do biomarker testing, he found out that I was ALK-positive (anaplastic lymphoma kinase). My very first thing that had to happen was I had brain surgery.

And I feel like I’m a very lucky girl to have survived all that I have, and I watched the pain in my husband’s eyes as I rolled back from brain surgery and the f as I woke up from that brain surgery. And then the next thing was my left lung was removed, and I remember seeing my two boys and as I rolled back, how they were afraid for me to lose my lung, something that they felt like I needed. And so again, we experienced so much joy as I came back from that lung surgery and eventually recovered, and then I remember the first day that I actually was able to run a mile again, and that was so incredibly exciting for me. So now I was diagnosed in 2015, and now it’s 2021 and through the years, I went through each targeted therapy and cancer outsmarted it, and so the targeted therapy failed me eventually. And each one lasted about a year or so, and I think that through these years, I kept thinking that science would keep up with me, and I kept riding that wave of science and research, and I was so thankful. But we knew that it was incredibly important to continue to fund research for lung cancer, because when it comes to lung cancer, it seems like even though it’s the number one cancer killer of men and women and anyone with lungs can get it. The funding for it is so low because there’s still a thought process that smoking is the cause of lung cancer, and while we know that there’s a lot of people that are just like me who have absolutely no risk factors, we know that research is incredibly important for this disease. So, fundraising for lung cancer research and through our group, ALKpositive.org was incredibly important for me.

I just kept hoping that the next thing would happen, but I finally ran out of the last targeted therapy, and so that’s when I started looking for a clinical trial. And right now, it’s not that easy to find a clinical trial. Within our group, we have some amazing volunteers and members who really work to put the clinical trials out there for ALK-positive patients and to make sure that we know that we’re aware of them. And so anyway, I had a great friend who helped me look through the clinical trials, and eventually I found the perfect clinical trial for me. But it required me to travel to Boston, Boston quite a bit, and so that was really difficult raising two young boys and having my husband, who is also working, not be available. It was just really not fitting with our family to be able to travel and be away from my family so much, so I kept looking for clinical trials, and I finally found one that was about 200 miles away. And it still requires me to leave my family about every two weeks or so, sometimes just for a blood draw, but I’m so incredibly encouraged, because we found out that the clinical trial of this combination drug is working, and we found that cancer though it had kind of spread everywhere in my body, in my brain and in my pancreas, and even around my pulmonary artery, all of the cancer had decreased by about 50 percent. So, I’m incredibly encouraged, and that’s where we are now in the journey, and we’re just going to hope that the clinical trial keeps working and that new options are coming down the pipeline for other lung cancer patients.

A clinical trial is something that has, my perception has completely changed about. I thought when I was first diagnosed, a clinical trial was kind of like being a guinea pig, and now I think that it’s more like being a pampered poodle. So, what I’ve learned is that clinical trials are really the best and newest care for patients, and I feel like all patients should have access and have the experience of a clinical trial. We know that sometimes clinical trials don’t always pan out to have the best thing, but I see over and over again that clinical trials for patients have a lot of science behind them, and it’s an opportunity for patients to try the latest and greatest.

If you’re considering a clinical trial as an option, the most important thing is for you to become informed, really make sure you understand some clinical trial, really understand what the expectations are of you, and make sure that you’re willing to do what’s required of the clinical trial, make sure, that also that it’s conducive to your lifestyle and to your family. I think those are the things that are the most important. A clinical trial is an opportunity for the latest and greatest, but you also have to make sure that you understand what’s required and make sure that you are okay with the requirements of the trial.

If I were to tell you how I’m feeling today, I would tell you that I’m feeling encouraged that I have so much hope for the future. Being a part of a clinical trial has…honestly, if I’m very, very truthful, it was scary at first. In fact, I even cried when I signed the clinical…the clinical trial consents. It was completely scary, but now that I’ve been into the clinical trial now about nine weeks, my last scans were really good and really promising, and so for me, I feel very, very hopeful for the future, and I’m hoping that this is a drug combination that can be brought to other patients and that they can all benefit from this clinical trial and from my experience.  

Lung Cancer: Donna’s Clinical Trial Profile

Lung Cancer: Donna’s Clinical Trial Profile from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Lung cancer patient Donna had a sub-optimal experience with her first treatment regimen. Watch as she shares her lung cancer journey, knowledge and benefits gained from a clinical trial, and her advice to patients seeking additional treatment options.

Patient-to-Patient Diverse Lung Cancer Clinical Trial Profiles

Transcript:

Donna: 

I’m Donna, I am 68 years old, and I was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2012. 

When I was first diagnosed with lung cancer, I was put on a regimen of paraplatin (Carboplatin) and bevacizumab (Avastin) drugs. I received that for four or five months and did not do particularly well on it.  My body did not react well to those chemicals, my tumors, however, did respond as long as I was getting the drug. 

After we discovered that my tumors were not going to respond to chemo unless I was getting it all the time, my doctor suggested that I either go on another drug, chemo drug that was even harsher than what I had been on and did not have as good of results or suggested that I might do a clinical trial. I had been told that I probably only had about four months to live. And I decided that, number one, I was in no hurry to be sicker than I already was and number two, that if there was a way I could help future patients by participating in a trial that the trial was the way I wanted to go. I never ever assumed that I would benefit from being in a clinical trial, I was very uninformed about clinical trials. 

A clinical trial is a way that the pharmaceutical company or researchers test certain drugs. They will see if the drug works at all, it moves to humans and out of the laboratory, and everything doesn’t necessarily work the same way or on humans as it did in the lab. So…in the Phase III trial like I was in, by that point in time, they’re learning how in the fairly general population, how the drug is going to react, if it’s actually going to work, how much of a dose is the right dose, and how frequent it should be. The clinical trial is just to provide the information that’s needed to determine whether a drug should go forward into the general population or not.  

One tumor started growing again, and I chose to have radiation, which made me have to get out of the clinical trial. But after radiation, I went back onto the same drug that we had been testing through the clinical trial, because I had responded so well through it, and I stayed on that drug until from 2013 until 2019. And during in April of 2019, I quit having any kind of treatments, and so now I’m just monitored every four months to make sure that my tumors have remained stable and so far, so good. 

I would go into a clinical trial without hesitation if my tumors begin to grow again, my first consideration will be to get into another clinical trial, you are getting the cutting-edge drug. And not only that, while I was in the clinical trial, I had a researcher and I had my oncologist, I had a lot of people really following my health. I had multiple, far more scans done, which some people might look at as a negative, but they were really following me closely to make sure that my response was what it needed to be. You can get out of the clinical trial, you are not stuck in a clinical trial. So, if you get into it and you are either sick or if your tumors are not responding the way you hope they would, you’re not stuck in a clinical trial, and that’s an important thing to know. To me, there will never be another option that I will consider first, I will always consider the clinical trial first. And because I felt that the quality of care I got was higher, and it also saves you a lot of money because at least the drug itself is going to be provided at no cost. 

So that’s a huge consideration too. 

I would not be afraid to look into clinical trials, I would never accept a doctor telling me that there were no options for me. I have friends who had doctors tell them that they just didn’t think there was anything more that could be done, they needed to go into hospice. My advice is to look for a different doctor, because that’s not always true. And clinical trials are not necessarily easy to find, but I would certainly do my due diligence and look into whether there is one that’s good for you. And I would also strongly recommend that you immediately go through genetic testing so that you know what kind of mutations you might have, because that will drive the kind of clinical trial you might be wanting to get into, and also just the treatment in general. 

BIPOC Lung Cancer Patients and Health Disparities

BIPOC Lung Cancer Patients and Health Disparities from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

What do some BIPOC lung cancer patients experience in terms of health disparities? Experts Dr. Nicole Rochester and Dr. Olugbenga Okusanya explain health disparities at the different stages of lung cancer diagnosis and treatment – and note differences in diagnosis and survival statistics. 

See More from Best Lung Cancer Care No Matter Where You Live


Related Resource:


Transcript:

Dr. Nicole Rochester: 

So I want to talk about racial and health disparities, ethnic and health disparities, specifically in lung cancer care. I know that you have done some research in this area, and certainly being a person of color, this is something that I would imagine you relate to, so we know that the CDC and many other healthcare organizations have now declared racism a public health crisis, and certainly in 2021, we continue to see worse outcomes for cancer and many other chronic illnesses in people of color, so I’m curious, what do you think are the notable health disparities that are consistently seen in treating BIPOC patients living with lung cancer?  

Dr. Olugbenga Okusanya: 

Yeah, unfortunately, this is an area of interest of mine. And it turns out that the disparities are literally every single stage, there’s not an aspect of lung cancer care, which there is not a significant disparity that hinders the ability of minority patients to get better care, period at all stages. So overall survival for lung cancer for Black patients is worse than white patients, even though Black patients get diagnosed on average two to three years younger than their white counterparts. Black patients are less likely to get surgical therapy for early-stage disease, which is the actual care for an early-stage disease dates than Black patients, than white patients, that gap has been narrowing over the last 20 years, but it is by no means closed. Black patients are unfortunately less likely to get an appropriate work-up to get the indicated tests. They are also less likely to get the chemotherapy when it is indicated, and they are less likely to be enrolled in clinical trials. So, literally at every step there is a significant inequity that affects Black patients, and I think it’s really disheartening to see in a field where lung cancer is the most common killer and cancer, and frankly, there are lot    s and lots of patients who have options, who have good options that never get investigated and never get delivered. 

Dr. Nicole Rochester: 

That is extremely heartbreaking, and it’s sad to hear that we see the same disparities in lung cancer that we see with every other chronic condition, with every other cancer, certainly what we’ve seen recently with COVID-19 as well. And it really underscores what you said previously, which is the importance of being an advocate for yourself and doing your research and making sure that you really are getting the best care.