Tag Archive for: endometrial cancer

How Can You Access Personalized Medicine for Endometrial Cancer?

How Can You Access Personalized Medicine for Endometrial Cancer? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

How can endometrial cancer patients access the most personalized treatment approach for their individual disease? This animated video reviews key treatment considerations, the impact of biomarker test results on therapy options, and advice for engaging in care decisions. 

Related Programs:

Endometrial Cancer Treatment and Research Updates

What Are Treatment Options for Endometrial Cancer?

Endometrial Cancer Treatment Decisions | Factors That Impact Your Options

Endometrial Cancer Treatment Decisions | Factors That Impact Your Options


Transcript:

Endometrial cancer research is evolving quickly, leading to targeted treatment approaches and helping patients access more personalized care.   

So, what is personalized medicine? Personalized medicine – also called precision medicine – is a type of care that is based on the genetic makeup and individual characteristics of a patient’s disease.  

This information is gathered using biomarker testing, which identifies key markers such as genes, proteins, or other molecules in a sample of tissue, blood, or other bodily fluid. The results of this testing can give a more detailed picture of the tumor’s type, aggressiveness, and may help predict how the cancer will behave. 

The test results can also identify which treatment approach may be most effective, through the presence of certain molecular markers.  For example, if biomarker testing results reveal that a tumor has either high microsatellite instability (MSI high) or mismatch repair defects (dMMR), an endometrial cancer patient may benefit from immunotherapy.  

Or, if the results show the HER-2 or mTOR mutation, this could indicate that the disease may respond well to a targeted therapy. And the presence of estrogen or progesterone receptors in a patient’s tumor may suggest hormonally targeted therapies may be beneficial. 

In addition to biomarker test results, other factors that physicians consider when recommending a treatment approach include:  

  • A patient’s age, overall health, and any pre-existing conditions. 
  • The type, stage, and grade of endometrial cancer.
  • And the patient’s preference. 

When considering treatment, patients should discuss the pros and cons of each option with their doctor. And they should review potential side effects, understand how the treatment is administered, and how the therapy may impact their lifestyle.  

So, what steps can YOU take to access personalized care? 

  • Find out if your doctor has experience treating endometrial cancer. Consulting a specialist or getting a second opinion can help confirm your diagnosis and treatment plan. 
  • Next, request all essential testing, including biomarker testing, and discuss how the results may impact prognosis and therapy options.  
  • You should also ensure that you understand ALL of the treatments available to you – including clinical trials.
  • And, make sure to have a friend or loved one present during discussions, so you can talk about the information later and feel confident in your decisions.
  • Finally, don’t hesitate to share your opinion and ask questions about available options. Remember, YOU should be at the center of your endometrial cancer care. 

To learn more about endometrial cancer and to access tools for self-advocacy, visit powerfulpatients.org/endometrial  

Endometrial Cancer Treatment Decisions | Factors That Impact Your Options

Endometrial Cancer Treatment Decisions | Factors That Impact Your Options from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Endometrial cancer expert Dr. Emily Ko explains health considerations and other key factors that may impact options when determining an optimal treatment approach for each patient. 

Dr. Emily Ko is a gynecologic oncologist and Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Pennsylvania. Learn more about Dr. Ko.

 

Related Programs:

How Is Endometrial Cancer Staged?

How Is Endometrial Cancer Staged?

What Are Treatment Options for Endometrial Cancer?

What Are Treatment Options for Endometrial Cancer?


Transcript:

Katherine:

Dr. Ko, what goes into determining a treatment approach for an individual patient? Is there key testing that helps guide a patient’s prognosis and treatment options? 

Dr. Ko:

Absolutely. So, I think the key pieces of information come from several sources. First, we do take the whole patient into account, like baseline health, baseline function, meaning every day, how active are you? Are there limitations to your daily activities? Looking at baseline health conditions, what we call comorbidities. Are there other health conditions, like diabetes, heart conditions, lung condition, kidney conditions, that could really impact a patient’s overall health and well-being? That is always part of it, number one. 

Then, we look specific to the cancer details. So, from all the pathology information, biopsies, followed by a surgical staging procedure, what exact stage, what exact substage, and we might even look at other unique features. Was there cells that got into the lymph vessels, the lymph nodes? Are there other just features from a pathology standpoint that are important, like the – I talked about microsatellite status, microsatellite instable versus microsatellite stable. 

Those are all information we can gather from the tumor tissue itself. That then kind of tailors our therapy. And then, like I was saying, now we’re going into this molecular era where we can actually take that tumor tissue and even do more expanded testing on it. 

So, I think it’s worthwhile to talk to your provider and say, “Hey, would it be worthwhile to send my tumor out for expanded testing, whether it’s done at your institution, at a specialized lab, or whether it’s sent out to a company that does expanded testing?” Because then, they might be able to test for 500 different genetic signatures, a much more broad panel, but that might open the door for opportunities to say, “Hey, you actually do have a very unique signature, and maybe it is worth tailoring your therapy even further.” 

So, I think these are very important questions to have with your provider, and these pieces of information can help guide the prognosis. I think we’re always asking what does this mean long-term, and I think when we have all these individual pieces of information, we can then give guidance on that.   

Katherine:

I wanted to get your point of view on why is it important for patients to engage in their care and their treatment decisions?  

Dr. Ko:

Right. I think that it is so important. Medical treatments, I think, do work the best for the patient when the patient is truly an active participant, and what I mean by that is I think we can really understand the patient if there’s a conversation, there’s a mutual discussion, and I think every patient has unique circumstances, has unique goals, has…whether it’s just the daily whatever responsibilities, or just either health or non-health concerns that they have, we want to be able to find a treatment that fits the patient, and we realize that one treatment doesn’t fit all. 

And so, the more, I think, that there is this mutual discussion, mutual understanding, then there’s a mutual decision treatment plan that is made, and there’s the more ability to modify that plan when – if you realize, oh, maybe we can tailor it, maybe we try one thing, and maybe we realize we got to change a little bit. 

And, I think that with a cancer condition, it is a journey. It is not just a one-time thing. It really is a journey, and I think that the more a patient can participate throughout that journey, I think the better the outcomes for the patient, and honestly, the better the treatment course will be for everyone participating.  

Katherine:

Why should a patient consider finding an endometrial cancer specialist? What are the benefits? 

Dr. Ko:

So, I think naturally, an endometrial cancer specialist is a provider who spends more time thinking about the disease, reading about it, looking at what’s the newest research studies that are coming out, what are the available clinical trials here, locally, regionally, or nationally, what are other support services available for the patient in the space. 

And, of course, probably the folks that do the most surgeries gear towards endometrial cancer patients, and so, I think just working in that space naturally then brings more resources and more opportunity for the patient to kind of really know what’s out there, what is the newest, and I think that really benefits the patient. 

Monitoring for an Endometrial Cancer Recurrence

Monitoring for an Endometrial Cancer Recurrence from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

How are endometrial cancer patients monitored for a recurrence? Expert Dr. Emily Ko shares insight about how monitoring is tailored to a patient’s individual disease and discusses the frequency of observation.

Dr. Emily Ko is a gynecologic oncologist and Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Pennsylvania. Learn more about Dr. Ko.

 

Related Programs:

Endometrial Cancer Treatment and Research Updates

What Should Endometrial Cancer Patients Know About Clinical Trials?

How Is Endometrial Cancer Staged?

How Is Endometrial Cancer Staged?


Transcript:

Katherine:

How are patients monitored for a recurrence, and are there approaches to help prevent a recurrence? 

Dr. Ko:

Sure, absolutely. Great question. It is important to continue monitoring patients, even after they’ve gone through treatment. So, I think of it as a multifaceted approach. Usually, it includes office visits, including a physical exam. It includes a thorough intake of all of their symptoms. 

It also includes – depending on the scenario – in some circumstances, regular imaging studies, such as a CT scan or MRI, and sometimes, we also do things like PET scans, and I think that does have to be tailored to the unique patient’s endometrial cancer, unique case, stage, histology, and we kind of tailor which tests we choose to do. The interval of monitoring can vary, so I would say generally speaking, it could be anywhere from three- to six-month visits, and with potentially added scans, as we talked about, and sometimes, we also do certain blood tests in certain cases where we may choose to follow a CA125 blood tumor marker. 

But, I would say that there are different, definitely variants to how we choose to monitor, and there are certain resources we tend to use, such as the NCCN guidelines that providers may reference, and sometimes may even share with the patients to explain why and how we choose to do the monitoring. 

What Are Treatment Options for Endometrial Cancer?

What endometrial cancer treatment options are currently available? Endometrial cancer expert Dr. Emily Ko shares an overview of options, including chemotherapy, surgery, radiation, targeted therapies, combination therapies, hormonal therapies, and discusses considerations for patients who are trying to preserve their fertility.

Dr. Emily Ko is a gynecologic oncologist and Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Pennsylvania. Learn more about Dr. Ko.

 

Related Programs:

How Is Endometrial Cancer Staged?

How Is Endometrial Cancer Staged?

Monitoring for an Endometrial Cancer Recurrence

Monitoring for an Endometrial Cancer Recurrence


Transcript:

Katherine:

I’d like to talk about the treatments that are currently available. You mentioned chemotherapy, but what else is available for people? 

Dr. Ko:

Absolutely. So, treatment for endometrial cancer is usually some combination of surgery, and then it may be followed by possibly chemotherapy, as well as radiation, and sometimes, it may be a combination of all three treatments, or sometimes, it’s a combination of one or two of those, depending on the exact stage, depending on the exact cell type, and some of the other factors. 

Katherine:

Are hormonal therapies used as well, and targeted therapies? 

Dr. Ko:

Yes. 

Katherine:

I know they are in other cancers. 

Dr. Ko:

Yes. And so, I think the question is where do those come into play? So, I would say the usual algorithm most commonly would be that surgery is done first, as the most common first step, and then, based on the information obtained from surgery and the pathology report that comes from that, then there’s usually some type of a recommendation about should there be a second stepped treatment, and that frequently can be chemotherapy/radiation.  

Now, the areas where targeted therapy – for example, immunotherapy – where does that come in? So, that now has come into the – I would call it the second stage. We’re combining it with the classic chemotherapy drugs – Taxol-carboplatin, for example. That’s one example where it could come into play. Another example could come into play where a patient had gone through classic Taxol/paclitaxel and carboplatin, then had cancer come back, and so, that could be another instance where that pembrolizumab or pembro with lenvatinib (Lenvima) combination can be used in the setting of recurrence. 

Now, we could also say, hey, if your cancer type has those hormonal receptors present or is some type of what we call endometrioid histology, and we think that hormonal therapy may be more effective in that case, then that could also be used in a setting where the cancer has kind of grown again, the cancer has grown back, or actually, there are certain situations where patients, for example, may not undergo a hysterectomy. 

And, there are unique cases and those situations where patients are still trying to preserve their fertility, and therefore not wanting to undergo a hysterectomy, or they’re unable to undergo surgery safely. And so, in some unique situations, we may also use hormonal therapy as the mechanism to treat their cancer, and whether that is by way of a pill, whether that is by way of a progesterone intrauterine device, IUD, that is placed into the uterus, we also have situations where we tailor the therapy to the condition of the patient. 

Katherine:

When treating more advanced endometrial cancer disease in general, are the treatment options different than if you were treating somebody who had stage I or stage II, for instance? 

Dr. Ko:

Sure, great question. So, for some patients with, say, stage I, surgery alone is enough. 

For some other patients, subcategories of stage I, where we call them more high/intermediate-risk patients, they’re stage I, but there are a few features about their pathology that might make them slightly higher risk for recurrence – in those cases, we might consider a little bit of radiation after surgery, what we call adjuvant radiation or what we call radiation vaginal brachytherapy. Just three short treatments of a little bit of radiation to the top of the vagina has been shown to possibly decrease chance of recurrence in that area with very minimal side effects. 

So, that would be more commonly in line with stage I. There are some subtypes that can still be what we call high-risk, even in stage I/stage II uterine serous carcinoma, uterine carcinosarcoma. In those cases, we might also recommend chemotherapy along with some vaginal brachytherapy following their hysterectomy, so that’s the early stage. 

And then, with the advanced stage, yes. So, frequently, it’d be surgery first to secure the diagnosis, followed by some type of – it might be primarily chemotherapy, or it could be combination chemotherapy with radiation. And over time, I would say our paradigm for what we use for chemotherapy and radiation has changed a little bit.  

If you go back a couple decades, I think radiation was used a lot – whole pelvic radiation, even just without any chemotherapy. And then, we then had more data from research clinical trials, GOG-258 or PORTEC-3, that then had given us evidence that perhaps doing chemotherapy with some combination of radiation is going to be beneficial, or even moving towards primarily radiation could be a very good option in terms of long-term benefit/long-term survival. 

And, of course, that brings us to the present day, those two trials that I mentioned from ASCO, the GY018 and the RUBY, now bringing in the immunotherapy component to the chemotherapy, so there has definitely been an evolution to managing advanced stage. 

What Should Endometrial Cancer Patients Know About Clinical Trials?

 

What Should Endometrial Cancer Patients Know About Clinical Trials? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Should endometrial cancer patients consider a clinical trial as a treatment option? Expert Dr. Emily Ko reviews the potential benefits of participating in a clinical trial.

Dr. Emily Ko is a gynecologic oncologist and Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Pennsylvania. Learn more about Dr. Ko.

Related Programs:

How Is Endometrial Cancer Staged?

How Is Endometrial Cancer Staged?

What Are Treatment Options for Endometrial Cancer?

What Are Treatment Options for Endometrial Cancer?


Transcript:

Katherine:

Well, you just mentioned clinical trials, and I think it’s a good topic to cover a little bit. Why is it important for patients to actually consider enrolling? What are the benefits for them? 

Dr. Ko:

Sure. So, while we certainly have a good armamentarium of standard-of-care therapies already, and I should mention that does include our classic chemotherapy drugs like paclitaxel (Abraxane), carboplatin (Paraplatin), and even doxorubicin (Adriamycin), if you will, or doxorubicin Hcl (Doxil), there are the immunotherapy drugs now that have become standard of care as well, like pembrolizumab (Keytruda), but sometimes, despite using those best available drugs, the cancer unfortunately either continues to grow or you had a good response, but somehow it shows up again – the cancer shows up again – and so, then, we’re looking for additional opportunities, additional therapies. 

And so, some of the best opportunities are actually to consider these clinical trials. The way that clinical trials are designed is that they always are going  to provide you at least a backbone of a standard available therapy, so you’re never going to get less than what would be considered standard of care. 

But, what they’re doing is they’re usually partnering another drug – a more novel therapy – or they’re basically testing a more novel therapy that could be more targeted, that could potentially have better efficacy than what’s already available standardly. And so, the value of that is that you could have an opportunity to have a therapy that could work even better. 

When you’ve tried something already, unfortunately, the cancer has grown, there is still opportunity, and while you’re on a clinical trial, I think one of the huge benefits is it’s very regulated. You are monitored so closely because at the base of all of this is safety. There is never going to be a drug or therapy that’s going to be administered to a patient without ensuring that there’s absolute safety for that patient, and so, that’s a way that you really have opportunity to get more treatment that could really help your cancer condition and do it in a very, very safe, formal fashion. 

Katherine:

And ultimately help others as well, in the future. 

Dr. Ko:

Exactly, absolutely, because as you’re participating in this process – and, of course, it’s a voluntary process to participate on a clinical trial, so we so appreciate all the patients who, in the past, have participated and are willing to participate in the future, but allows us also to really gather a lot of information to really inform cancer treatment for all the patients coming down the road, and those could be anyone. They could be our neighbors, our friends, our own family members, and that could really be so helpful to everyone that’s going through this type of thing. 

Katherine:

Absolutely, yeah. I’d like to back up a bit and talk about what endometrial cancer is. It’s often referred to as uterine cancer. So, are they the same thing? Are these terms interchangeable? 

Dr. Ko:

Sure, it’s a great question. So, endometrial cancer refers to cancer that starts in what I call the lining of the uterine cavity. So, inside the uterus, there’s a uterine cavity, and there’s a tissue that coats that cavity, and that’s called the endometrium. So, endometrial cancer is basically when cancer cells start growing from that tissue. And, of course, since that exists in the uterus, of course, it’s considered uterine cancer, and we’re just being a little bit more specific when we say endometrial cancer. But, of course, endometrial cancer is the most common form of uterine cancer by far, so in some ways, it’s almost – it’s synonymous. 

How Is Endometrial Cancer Staged?

 

How Is Endometrial Cancer Staged? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

What are the stages of endometrial cancer? Expert Dr. Emily Ko explains factors involved in analysis for staging and what occurs in the body during each stage.

Dr. Emily Ko is a gynecologic oncologist and Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Pennsylvania. Learn more about Dr. Ko.

Related Programs:

Endometrial Cancer Treatment and Research Updates

What Should Endometrial Cancer Patients Know About Clinical Trials?

What Are Treatment Options for Endometrial Cancer?

What Are Treatment Options for Endometrial Cancer?


Transcript:

Katherine:

How is endometrial cancer staged? 

Dr. Ko:

So, the most classic, rigorous way to stage endometrial cancer is through a surgical procedure. So, what that usually involves is it does include a hysterectomy, removing the uterus and the cervix, usually also includes removing the fallopian tubes and the ovaries.  

And, at the same time, the surgeon will do a very thorough assessment of the abdominal pelvic cavity, basically looking around all those areas to see if there’s any signs of visible disease, anything they can see that looks like it could be tumor deposits in the abdominal cavity. If anything is seen, those deposits will be removed and biopsied, so that’s part of the staging procedure. 

And additionally, it’s important to try to assess the lymph nodes, typically. So, there are lymph nodes in the pelvic area, and then, higher up along the aortic area, and so, there are different surgical techniques that we can use to basically test or sample some of those lymph nodes, be able to remove them, send them to the pathologist, look under the microscope to see if there are any microscopic cancer cells that have traveled to those lymph nodes. 

So, that is all part of a surgical procedure, and with all the information collected from those tissue samples that are removed from the body and sent to the pathologist, but the pathologist then reviews all of that under a microscope, and then can issue a very thorough report describing where the cancer cells are located, and by definition, where the cancer cells are located then defines what the stage is of the cancer. 

Katherine:

Can you give me an example?  

Dr. Ko:

Of course. So, for example, if the cancer cells are located only in the uterus, and they’re not found anywhere else, then that is a stage I. If the cancer cells have traveled to the cervix area specifically, this we call a cervical stroma, that becomes a stage II. If the cancer cells have, for example, traveled to the fallopian tubes, or the ovaries, or the lymph nodes, then that becomes a stage III, and there are sort of substages within those categories as well. 

Katherine:

But stage III would be the highest or most severe? 

Dr. Ko:

So, there’s stage III, and then there’s actually stage IV. So, if the cancer cells have traveled outside of the pelvis into the abdominal area, then we consider that a stage IV. 

Katherine:

And that would be considered advanced endometrial cancer? 

Dr. Ko:

Right. So, by definition, “advanced” typically refers to stage III or IV. 

Endometrial Cancer Treatment and Research Updates

Are there advances in endometrial cancer research that patients should know about? Expert Dr. Emily Ko shares updates about ongoing clinical trials, including immunotherapy and combination approaches, and discusses how endometrial cancer subtypes affect treatment options. 
 
Dr. Emily Ko is a gynecologic oncologist and Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Pennsylvania. Learn more about Dr. Ko.

Related Programs:

What Should Endometrial Cancer Patients Know About Clinical Trials?

How Is Endometrial Cancer Staged?

How Is Endometrial Cancer Staged?

What Are Treatment Options for Endometrial Cancer?

What Are Treatment Options for Endometrial Cancer?


Transcript:

Katherine:

Well, let’s start by learning about the latest research news. Just this June, endometrial cancer researchers from around the world met to discuss their findings at the annual American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting, or ASCO, in Chicago. Can you walk us through the highlights that patients should know about? 

Dr. Ko:

Sure. So, the ASCO meeting is a very big meeting that happens once a year in June, and really, it is a national – actually, international – meeting where the biggest breakthroughs in cancer therapy are really presented and discussed. 

So, within the field of gynecologic cancer and specifically endometrial cancer, we really saw a couple breakthrough clinical trial results, if you will. The two specific trials that have hit the spotlight – and, it was presented at ASCO; they were also previously presented at the Society of Gynecologic Oncology annual meeting in March of 2023. These two trials – one of them is called GY018, and the other one is called RUBY, and these two trials specifically were geared at patients with endometrial cancer of either advanced stage, meaning stage III or IV at diagnosis, or patients who have recurrent endometrial cancer.  

And, these both trials were very large, multisite, international trials enrolling a huge number of patients. They were randomized controlled trials, meaning that they were specifically testing what we call a standard therapy, Taxol-carboplatin, versus a standard therapy plus a newer agent, and that newer agent falls in the realm of an immunotherapy drug. 

So, with this kind of novel approach, where we’re combining standardly used chemotherapy plus a newer immunotherapy drug, the question was if you did this combination, would patients have a better outcome? And, in fact, the groundbreaking news was that yes, patients did have a better outcome with this new combination of therapy, and this was shown in various forms of results. 

One of the primary outcomes is always something called survival, and with the GY018, they looked at progression-free survival as a primary outcome, and it did show that patients on this new combination did better with progression-free survival. And the difference was about median of about three months. Now, that may not sound like a whole lot. However, in the realm of cancer therapy, when you take a very large group of patients, that was a meaningful difference that was statistically significant. 

And furthermore, as we’re moving forward with our therapy drugs, we are moving into this era of targeted therapy, precision medicine, where we’re really trying to hone into more the specifics of the biology of each person’s cancer, and not treating everyone the same. 

What’s interesting with these two trials is when they looked at different subpopulations of patients with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer, whether they had a type of endometrial cancer that was considered MSI-high, or a microsatellite instable type of cancer, which basically refers to a certain biology of these endometrial cancers, it has to deal with how the cells – the cancer cells – behave, how they’re able to not follow the rules and be able to replicate themselves.  

The patients who are MSI-high particularly had a really great response with this chemotherapy, so it was even beyond just a three-month difference. With that being said, even in patients who are what we call microsatellite-stable, who didn’t have this unique signature, they still saw a benefit with this novel combination, and to add to that, the nice thing about it is the toxicities were not bad. Even this new combination was very well-tolerated. 

It was not a high rate of severe toxicities or side effects, if you will, and that actually, the great majority of patients were able to stay on this therapy and really get through – complete the therapy course.  

So, there are some sort of nuanced differences between the two trials I mentioned, GY018 versus the RUBY. And some of those details are with regards to the even specific subtype of endometrial cancer, which we haven’t talked about yet, for example, uterine carcinosarcoma versus uterine serous carcinoma, uterine clear cell, uterine endometrioid – these are all specific subtypes of endometrial cancer. So there are some nuances where the RUBY trial was able to include patients with uterine carcinosarcoma, whereas the GY018 did not. 

But suffice it to say, now we have enough data that virtually all endometrial cancer patients with advanced stage, regardless of what histology, there is essentially a trial that can apply to you where it demonstrated this added benefit to doing this novel combination, and that was found with microsatellite-stable patients as well as microsatellite-instable in both randomized controlled trials that I mentioned. 

Katherine:

Dr. Ko, are there other research or treatment advances that patients should know about? 

Dr. Ko:

Certainly. Like I mentioned, we’re really moving towards the realm of treating with a targeted therapy approach, and within endometrial cancer, the prior paradigm was much simpler, but really not in the space of target therapy. So, for example, what does that mean? 

So, as we’re realizing that there are very unique biologic signatures to different patients’ endometrial cancer – there could be, for example, some cancers that are particularly receptive to hormonal therapy, meaning their specific cancer, when we send it for detailed – we call it genomic or somatic testing, we can discover, oh, they have estrogen-receptor-positive, progesterone-receptor-positive, and so, those type of cancers may be very responsive to hormonal-based therapy, and in that space, we have a standard available drugs, but we also have clinical trials that are trying newer drugs. 

If, for example, the standard aromatase inhibitor or the standard progesterone agent may be helpful, but there are even more in that space that this point – CDK inhibitors that you can combine with these aromatase inhibitors or hormonal agents that have been around for longer that have shown a lot of promise, a lot of data in breast cancer. But now we’re realizing, wow, there could be some efficacy in endometrial cancer as well, so that’s just one example.  

And there’s other unique biologic gene signatures, again, kind of a good list now out there, that are being studied in various clinical trials, whether they’re PARP inhibitors, whether they’re drugs that target CCNE1, whether they’re drugs that target ARID1A, so there are actually many more that are available. So, they’re really expanding the opportunity for treatment for endometrial cancer patients. 

Becoming an Empowered and [ACT]IVATED After An Endometrial Cancer Diagnosis

Patient Empowerment Network (PEN) is committed to helping educate and empower patients and care partners in the endometrial cancer community. Endometrial cancer treatment options are ever-expanding with new treatments, and it’s important for patients and families to educate themselves about testing, factors in treatment decisions, treatment types, and disparities in care. With this goal in mind, we kicked off the [ACT]IVATED Endometrial Cancer program, which aims to inform, empower, and engage patients to stay abreast of the latest in endometrial cancer care.

Endometrial cancer is a cancer of the lining of the uterus where menstruation occurs. Abnormal bleeding is a common symptom of endometrial cancer. PEN is proud to add information about endometrial cancer to serve more patients and their families.

Endometrial cancer survivor Mikki Goodwin interviewed expert Dr. Ebony Hoskins, a board-certified gynecologic oncologist at MedStar Washington Hospital Center and Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology at Georgetown University Medical Center. Mikki was initially diagnosed as stage III and progressed to stage IVB after a complete hysterectomy. Her treatment journey included a robotic hysterectomy, six rounds of chemotherapy, and 26 rounds of radiation.

Factors in Endometrial Cancer Treatment Options

Endometrial cancer care can have different options depending on the stage and other factors. Stage IV endometrial cancer survivor Mikki Goodwin spoke with expert Dr. Ebony Hoskins from MedStar Washington Hospital Center. Dr. Hoskins explained some of the factors that play into treatment decisions. “I think we follow kind of certain guidelines, if you will and providing standard of care and the first frontline therapy is pretty standard, right? In terms of advanced treatment, when patients recur and we have to look at alternate treatment therapies, I always look at the patient, I always look at what their medical problems are or any side effects. And, of course, the data to see how well are they going to do, what side effects and quality of life? There are numerous factors that are not just something looking in a book and say, ‘Okay, I’ll take A,’ right? Like I think we have to look at all of that and make a decision with our patients over undergoing the side effects, the efficacy, all of these things that are in mind when we talk to patients.”

Dr. Ebony Hoskins and Mikki Goodwin

Endometrial Cancer Disparities 

Dr. Ebony Hoskins shared about endometrial cancer disparities. “…we know that Black women are diagnosed pretty much at the same rate as white women, but have a two times higher risk of death. And so that alone is a big disparity. We also see…more aggressive tumor types in Black women…I think some of the clinical trials have recognized that there is a low number of patients in these trials advancing, and so there has been an increased effort in recruiting patients into these

trials. I think there is more work being done, to understand the biology and why there’s a difference. Me as a provider I will always think, ‘Oh, it’s because women went to the doctor late or access to care.’ And then I’m like, ‘Well, no, no, no these women have access to care. They have access to insurance. They went to the doctor right away.’ And so I think it’s very complex and deserves more study into it.”

Dr. Hoskins further explained about the importance of diversity in clinical trials. “…I think clinical trial participation is important in endometrial cancer. Number one, the rate of Black women getting advanced and aggressive endometrial cancer is on the rise. The representation in these trials are different. What’s different is not only the patient, the tumor type is different. How do we know that these same patients that’s not in the trials are going to respond to this treatment? That’s what I always ask…maybe they don’t respond as well, because that’s a different disease type, right?”

Marginalized patient groups are another area of concern for endometrial cancer patients, and Dr. Hoskins explained some of these patient groups. “…I think we could say minority populations, we can say Black women, we can say Hispanic women, and…marginalized, patients who don’t have access to care. Yes. I definitely think that you could or they could have a worse outcome, whether it’s for lack of access for someone who may not be insured or for patients who may be in this country without proper documentation getting the medical care that they may need…we’ve talked about race as being a risk factor, and again, access to care is certainly a risk factor…So disadvantaged populations could be patients who live in rural areas, patients with gender identity changes.” 

Solutions Toward Better Endometrial Cancer Care

Clinical trial participation is vital to develop effective endometrial cancer treatment for all patients. Dr. Hoskins had a recent interaction with an endometrial cancer patient and shared about her interaction.

“I recently had a patient that I referred to a clinical trial. And she really was struggling with whether she should do it or not. And one of the things that I said to her is, ‘I think it’s important. One, you’re going to have access to advanced treatment options that are not there now. And Black women are dying, and we need this information to know if this is the same.’ And she instantly was like, ‘I’m going, I’m doing it.’ And I think it’s very important that we have patients with access to trials.”

Dr. Hoskins also shared her perspective about patients advocating for their best care. “…it’s okay to find a different provider, or a doctor to make sure that you’re heard.…seek alternate care or another opinion. I think it’s very important that patients have a doctor that they trust and feel like they can ask questions for…I really don’t think it’s okay to be dismissed.”

Cancer survivor Mikki Goodwin has been involved with the Endometrial Cancer Action Network for African-Americans (ECANA), which has served as a partner for the [ACT]IVATED Endometrial Cancer program. Mikki shared her patient experience and the importance of empowering yourself as a patient. “Live on purpose every day, be your best advocate, record doctor appointments, you’ll never remember everything, so it’s good to be able to play it back, take one day at a time, rest when you need to rest that is part of healing, and stay hydrated. Having cancer is not a sentence to die, but a call to live intentionally. More than anything, stay positive, more than half the battle starts in the mind.”

Dr. Ebony Hoskins

[ACT]IVATED Endometrial Cancer Program Resources

The [ACT]IVATED Endometrial Cancer program series takes a three-part approach to inform, empower, and engage both the overall endometrial cancer community and endometrial cancer patient groups who experience health disparities. The series includes the following resources:

Though there are endometrial cancer disparities, patients and care partners can be proactive in educating themselves to help ensure optimal care. We hope you can take advantage of these valuable resources to aid in your endometrial cancer care for yourself or for your loved one.

[ACT]IVATION Tip:  

By texting EMPOWER to +1-833-213-6657, you can receive personalized support from PENs Empowerment Leads. Whether you’re a endometrial cancer patient, or caring for someone who is living with it, PEN’s Empowerment Leads will be here for you at every step of your journey. Learn more.

 

What Endometrial Cancer Patients Should Know About Clinical Trials

What Endometrial Cancer Patients Should Know About Clinical Trials from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

What do endometrial cancer patients need to know about clinical trials? Expert Dr. Ebony Hoskins explains the importance of clinical trial participation for all patients and shares advice for patients to improve their clinical trial access. 

Dr. Ebony Hoskins is a board-certified gynecologic oncologist at MedStar Washington Hospital Center and assistant professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology at Georgetown University Medical Center.

[ACT]IVATION TIP

“…asking their provider, one, are clinicals trial offered at their institution. And second, if it’s not offered at the institution, do you think that, are there any other institutions that may offer trials for the patient?”

Download Guide  |  Descargar Guía en Español

See More from [ACT]IVATED Endometrial Cancer

Related Resources:

Emerging Endometrial Cancer Treatments _ Promising Data and Challenges

Emerging Endometrial Cancer Treatments | Promising Data and Challenges

Endometrial Cancer Treatment Options for Patients to Consider

Endometrial Cancer Treatment Options for Patients to Consider

What is the Role of Immunotherapy in Endometrial Cancer

What is the Role of Immunotherapy in Endometrial Cancer?

Transcript:

Mikki:

Dr. Hoskins, why is clinical trial participation so important in endometrial cancer? What advice do you have for patients considering a clinical trial?

Dr. Ebony Hoskins:

So I think clinical trial participation is important in endometrial cancer. Number one, the rate of Black women getting advanced and aggressive endometrial cancer is on the rise. The representation in these trials are different. What’s different is not only the patient, the tumor type is different. How do we know that these same patients that’s not in the trials are going to respond to this treatment? That’s what I always ask. I’m like, maybe they don’t respond as well, because that’s a different disease type, right?

So we recently looked at a trial where most of the patients had an endometrioid type of endometrial cancer, whereas I, in my practice, I see a lot of Black women who don’t have endometrioid type. They may have a serous type, which is a more aggressive type or a carcinosarcoma. So I don’t know if I can really apply that to this, to that the medication.

That’s all I have, but how do I know that she’s going to respond in the same way? So I think it’s definitely important. I recently had a patient that I referred to a clinical trial. And she really was struggling with whether she should do it or not. And one of the things that I said to her is, “I think it’s important. One, you’re going to have access to advanced treatment options that are not there now.” And I said, also I said, “Not that she has to take it for a whole group, but we need to have more information on the type of cancer you have.” And I was like, “And Black women are dying, and we need this information to know if this is the same.” And she instantly was like, “I’m going, I’m doing it.” And I mean, not that she has to take, but we need to know more. And I think it’s very important that we have patients with access to trials.

Mikki:

Yes. Do you have an activation tip for those patients that you see?

Dr. Ebony Hoskins:

I think asking their provider, one, are clinical trials offered at their institution. And second, if it’s not offered at the institution, do you think that, are there any other institutions that may offer trials for the patient? There are sometimes where patients don’t have the opportunity to travel elsewhere and need to be in their community for work, family, etcetera. So I understand the asking. 


Share Your Feedback:

Create your own user feedback survey

Endometrial Cancer Treatment Options for Patients to Consider

Endometrial Cancer Treatment Options for Patients to Consider from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

What do endometrial cancer patients need to consider for treatment options? Expert Dr. Ebony Hoskins explains key factors that play into treatment decisions and recommended questions for patients to ask their doctor.

Dr. Ebony Hoskins is a board-certified gynecologic oncologist at MedStar Washington Hospital Center and assistant professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology at Georgetown University Medical Center.

[ACT]IVATION TIP

“…asking the right questions in terms of “How effective is this treatment that you’re recommending? Do you think it’s worth the side effects? Is my quality of life going to be affected? Can I still travel?”

Download Guide  |  Descargar Guía en Español

See More from [ACT]IVATED Endometrial Cancer

Related Resources:

Emerging Endometrial Cancer Treatments _ Promising Data and Challenges

Emerging Endometrial Cancer Treatments | Promising Data and Challenges

What Endometrial Cancer Patients Should Know About Clinical Trials

What Endometrial Cancer Patients Should Know About Clinical Trials

What is the Role of Immunotherapy in Endometrial Cancer

What is the Role of Immunotherapy in Endometrial Cancer?

Transcript:

Mikki:

Dr. Hoskins, how do you work with your patients to make treatment decisions and what increase in treatment options, what should endometrial cancer patients consider when deciding on treatment?

Dr. Ebony Hoskins:

So I think this is a good question. In terms of patients up front, I think we follow kind of certain guidelines, if you will and providing standard of care and the first frontline therapy is pretty standard, right? In terms of advanced treatment, when patients recur and we have to look at alternate treatment therapies, I always look at the patient, I always look at what their medical problems are or any side effects. And, of course, the data to see how well are they going to do what side effects and quality of life?

There are numerous factors that are not just something looking in a book and say, “Okay, I’ll take A,” right? Like I think we have to look at all of that and make a decision with our patients over undergoing the side effects, the efficacy, all of these things that are in mind when we talk to patients. So my activation tip for patients would be being involved in the decision-making, asking the right questions in terms of “How effective is this treatment that you’re recommending? Do you think it’s worth the side effects? Is my quality of life going to be affected? Can I still travel?” Those are questions like, we want to live, right? And I don’t think anybody wants to be stuck every three weeks getting treatment or…so those are questions to ask in terms of like, quality of life. And so those are questions that I would recommend you ask your doctor when you’re deciding what treatments. 


Share Your Feedback:

Create your own user feedback survey

Emerging Endometrial Cancer Treatments | Promising Data and Challenges

Emerging Endometrial Cancer Treatments | Promising Data and Challenges from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

What is the latest in endometrial cancer treatment updates? Expert Dr. Ebony Hoskins shares updates from the RUBY study and one NRG study and provides advice for patients.

Dr. Ebony Hoskins is a board-certified gynecologic oncologist at MedStar Washington Hospital Center and assistant professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology at Georgetown University Medical Center.

[ACT]IVATION TIP

“…if someone’s diagnosed with endometrial cancer, ‘Am I a candidate for a clinical trial to be a part of this new frontier, if you will, for endometrial cancer?’”

Download Guide  |  Descargar Guía en Español

See More from [ACT]IVATED Endometrial Cancer

Related Resources:

Endometrial Cancer Treatment Options for Patients to Consider

Endometrial Cancer Treatment Options for Patients to Consider

What Endometrial Cancer Patients Should Know About Clinical Trials

What Endometrial Cancer Patients Should Know About Clinical Trials

What is the Role of Immunotherapy in Endometrial Cancer

What is the Role of Immunotherapy in Endometrial Cancer?

Transcript:

Mikki:

Dr. Hoskins, what endometrial cancer data and studies coming out of major medical conferences are you most excited about? And can you speak to those kinks and challenges or promises of emerging treatments?

Dr. Ebony Hoskins:

Well, Mikki, I’m very excited. The SGO 2023 in Tampa, Florida, we had new data that came out from one of the NRG studies as well as another study called the RUBY Study. And both were looking at up-front carboplatin (Paraplatin) and paclitaxel (Abraxane) with the addition of immunotherapy. And we saw improved progression-free survival. So that means when the disease is no longer there, how long are patients living without it recurring, and that has increased. So this is a big deal.

And then one of the studies showed again, the data is still maturing so it’s not completely out there yet. So we still have to wait on it, but there may be improved overall survival. And that’s kind of one of the study goals that we always want to do is improve overall survival. So I’m excited about that. There was also some new data looking at whether up-front patients with advanced endometrial cancer, whether they are treated with systemic chemotherapy versus systemic chemotherapy and radiation.

And this is a long ongoing survival data that said, patients basically did equally well with just chemotherapy alone without the addition of radiation. So that I think is very interesting, because we use radiation and chemotherapy in patients with advanced endometrial cancer. That certainly doesn’t mean that it’s not an option, just means that it may need to be more tailored and discussed and discussed with our radiation oncology colleagues.

In terms of what the challenges are, I think immunotherapy is a game changer. But it’s also what I use in terms of second-line treatment. So now I’m using it up front. What happens if a patient recurs while on it? What am I going to do now? That’s my question. What am I going to do next? And I’m not too worried because there are new treatment options that are out. Again, they are not necessarily standard now, but they’re ongoing in clinical trials. So I’m not too worried. But definitely some questions that cross my mind. My activation tip for this for patients is if someone’s diagnosed with endometrial cancer, “Am I a candidate for a clinical trial to be a part of this new frontier, if you will, for endometrial cancer?” 


Share Your Feedback:

  Create your own user feedback survey

What Is the Role of Immunotherapy in Endometrial Cancer?

What is the Role of Immunotherapy in Endometrial Cancer? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

What is the role of immunotherapy in endometrial cancer care? Expert Dr. Ebony Hoskins shares immunotherapy research updates from the Society of Gynecologic Oncologists and advice for patients.

Dr. Ebony Hoskins is a board-certified gynecologic oncologist at MedStar Washington Hospital Center and assistant professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology at Georgetown University Medical Center.

[ACT]IVATION TIP

“…asking the question, if someone is being recommended to start chemotherapy which is typically carboplatin paclitaxel, asking, “Am I a candidate for immunotherapy?’”

Download Guide  |  Descargar Guía en Español

See More from [ACT]IVATED Endometrial Cancer

Related Resources:

Endometrial Cancer Treatment Options for Patients to Consider

Endometrial Cancer Treatment Options for Patients to Consider

What Endometrial Cancer Patients Should Know About Clinical Trials

What Endometrial Cancer Patients Should Know About Clinical Trials

Emerging Endometrial Cancer Treatments _ Promising Data and Challenges

Emerging Endometrial Cancer Treatments | Promising Data and Challenges

Transcript:

Mikki:

Dr. Hoskins, what is the role for immunotherapy for patients with advanced endometrial cancer?

Dr. Hoskins:

Well, I’m not sure if you have heard, Mikki, both this year at our 2023 Society of Gynecologic Oncologists, there are two research studies that show immunotherapy improved progression-free survival in patients with metastatic or advanced endometrial cancer. One of the studies even showed improvement in overall survival. And this data is still ongoing and collected and needs more maturity.

But this is a big deal that we can now offer not just chemotherapy but immunotherapy up front, meaning up front now to patients and improved progression-free survival and possibly overall survival. Again, the data is still maturing. So, to know that, but this is something that I didn’t offer one year ago to my patients, that now I can offer. So this is a big deal. If you haven’t figured that out, it’s a big deal.

So in terms of my activation tip for this question, I think asking the question, if someone is being recommended to start chemotherapy which is typically carboplatin paclitaxel (Paraplatin Abraxane), asking, “Am I a candidate for immunotherapy?’ May or may not be, but I think that’s the question. “Am I a candidate?” That’s what I would ask.


Share Your Feedback:

Create your own user feedback survey

What Treatment Options Are Available for Advanced Endometrial Cancer?

What Treatment Options Are Available for Advanced Endometrial Cancer? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

What are the latest advanced endometrial cancer treatment options? Expert Dr. Ebony Hoskins shares updates about research advances and advice for newly diagnosed patients to be proactive in their care.

Dr. Ebony Hoskins is a board-certified gynecologic oncologist at MedStar Washington Hospital Center and assistant professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology at Georgetown University Medical Center.

[ACT]IVATION TIP

“…if a patient is newly diagnosed with endometrial cancer, is going in, knowing that we have more molecular markers, ‘Hey, are you going to send my tumor for next-generation sequencing, or are you going to be looking at the tumor for more information about targets that we could use for treatment?’

Download Guide  |  Descargar Guía en Español

See More from [ACT]IVATED Endometrial Cancer

Related Resources:

What Treatment Options and Factors Should Be Considered for Endometrial Cancer

What Treatment Options and Factors Should Be Considered for Endometrial Cancer?

Are Endometrial Cancer Outcomes Worse for Minority Patients

Are Endometrial Cancer Outcomes Worse for Underrepresented Patients?

How Can Endometrial Cancer Patients Advocate for Better Care

How Can Endometrial Cancer Patients Advocate for Better Care?

Transcript:

Mikki:

Okay. Dr. Hoskins, fortunately, the endometrial cancer arsenal keeps expanding. What promising treatments are available to patients facing advanced endometrial cancer diagnosis?

Dr. Ebony Hoskins:

So, in recent years, we’ve had more research dollars into endometrial cancer that wasn’t there, say even five to 10 years ago. Some of the promising treatments that are coming about, are treatments that look at the molecular markers, meaning when we look at the tumor, and determining what proteins that are upregulated or down, now we have treatments that can more target, if you will, the specific cancer. So I think, these are definitely promising.

Other promising things that are occurring is that we are having more clinical trials that are offered for patients with advanced endometrial cancer that I know in my earlier years in practice or even in training, that just were not there. So I think this is a good time in the advancement in terms of endometrial cancer.

So my activation tip for this would be if a patient is newly diagnosed with endometrial cancer, is going in, knowing that we have more molecular markers, “Hey, are you going to send my tumor for next-generation sequencing, or are you going to be looking at the tumor for more information about targets that we could use for treatment?”

So those are questions that as a patient you can ask, because now these treatments are covered, and the testing is covered. And so we’re in a different realm than we were say, even five to 10 years ago. 


Share Your Feedback:

  Create your own user feedback survey

How Can Endometrial Cancer Patients Advocate for Better Care?

How Can Endometrial Cancer Patients Advocate for Better Care? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

How can endometrial cancer patients empower themselves for better care? Dr. Ebony Hoskins shares advice for patients who feel dismissed or unheard when seeing their care provider.

Dr. Ebony Hoskins is a board-certified gynecologic oncologist at MedStar Washington Hospital Center and assistant professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology at Georgetown University Medical Center.

[ACT]IVATION TIP

“…seek alternate care or another opinion. I think it’s very important that patients have a doctor that they trust and feel like they can ask questions for. I don’t, I really don’t think it’s okay to be dismissed.”

Download Guide  |  Descargar Guía en Español

See More from [ACT]IVATED Endometrial Cancer

Related Resources:

What Treatment Options and Factors Should Be Considered for Endometrial Cancer

What Treatment Options and Factors Should Be Considered for Endometrial Cancer?

Are Endometrial Cancer Outcomes Worse for Minority Patients

Are Endometrial Cancer Outcomes Worse for Underrepresented Patients?

What Treatment Options Are Available for Advanced Endometrial Cancer

What Treatment Options Are Available for Advanced Endometrial Cancer?

Transcript:

Mikki:

Dr. Hoskins, what is your message to women who speak up and their concerns are dismissed and aren’t taken seriously?

Dr. Ebony Hoskins:

Well, Mikki, do you want to know my real answer? I don’t think you do. But I’m going to tell you anyway. So anytime I hear a patient that say they did not feel heard, I always say, “You understand that you can get a different provider, right?” So that also means that if a patient does not have the trust anytime you don’t have trust, you don’t have a relationship, and that it’s okay to find a different provider, or a doctor to make sure that you’re heard. And I have seen women who don’t have any type of gynecologic cancer who have come to my office for a second opinion. And when it, and I say, well, “Why are you here?” And they said, “Well, I was really looking for someone that looked like me that I could trust to tell me, because when I asked these questions, I was dismissed.”

And so I was happy to give the opinion, but really sad that this particular patient had to travel to see someone that they really didn’t need to see, to get an answer that she was actually looking for, and not looking for the wrong answer. She just wasn’t, her question wasn’t being answered. And so I think if you don’t have the trust, there are other providers in our communities and getting those names from either a primary care provider you know, and I always hit or miss on the online thing from family members, friends about doctors that they like or that have a good reputation in terms of listening to their patients.

Mikki:

I also have one patient, I mean not a patient. I have a connect that dealt with this, this right here. And she went to several doctors before she got her diagnosis and which means time had spanned in between that time and her trying to look and saying, “Hey, this is what’s wrong. This is what I’m feeling. I know it can’t be this.” And she’s just going from doctor to doctor. And in between that time she missed some care that she had needed in that time. So what would be your activation tip for someone like that?

Dr. Ebony Hoskins: 

I think, just like I said before, seek alternate care or another opinion. I think it’s very important that patients have a doctor that they trust and feel like they can ask questions for. I don’t, I really don’t think it’s okay to be dismissed. 

Mikki:

Thank you so much.


Share Your Feedback:

  Create your own user feedback survey

Are Endometrial Cancer Outcomes Worse for Underrepresented Patients?

Are Endometrial Cancer Outcomes Worse for Underrepresented Patients? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo

How do endometrial cancer outcomes compare for patients from marginalized groups? Expert Dr. Ebony Hoskins shares risk factors for optimal endometrial cancer care and advice for patients to receive assistance for their care.

Dr. Ebony Hoskins is a board-certified gynecologic oncologist at MedStar Washington Hospital Center and assistant professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology at Georgetown University Medical Center.

[ACT]IVATION TIP

“…asking the question about their risk. If someone is not insured, asking the hospital or a cancer center that’s there about any resources that are available to say, patients who are uninsured or underinsured, there are programs that are there. And even for medications, some of the manufacturers have programs that pay for medications.”

Download Guide  |  Descargar Guía en Español

See More from [ACT]IVATED Endometrial Cancer

Related Resources:

What Treatment Options and Factors Should Be Considered for Endometrial Cancer

What Treatment Options and Factors Should Be Considered for Endometrial Cancer?

How Can Endometrial Cancer Patients Advocate for Better Care

How Can Endometrial Cancer Patients Advocate for Better Care?

What Treatment Options Are Available for Advanced Endometrial Cancer

What Treatment Options Are Available for Advanced Endometrial Cancer?

Transcript:

Mikki:

Dr. Hoskins, is endometrial cancer worse for a marginalized population? And are there any specific risk factors that put some at risk more than others?

Dr. Ebony Hoskins:

So I think marginalized populations, I think we could say minority populations, we can say Black women, we can say Hispanic women, and we can say people who, I’m trying to define, if you were the marginalized, patients who don’t have access to care. Yes. I definitely think that you could or they could have a worse outcome, whether it’s for lack of access for someone who may not be insured or for patients who may be in this country without proper documentation getting the medical care that they may need. Yeah, I think it can certainly be and I’ve seen those. I think risk factors, and we’ve talked about race as being a risk factor, and again, access to care is certainly a risk factor.

I think those are probably the bigger risk, if you will. So my activation tip for patients would be asking the question about their risk. If someone is not insured, asking the hospital or a cancer center that’s there about any resources that are available to say, patients who are uninsured or underinsured, there are programs that are there. And even for medications, some of the manufacturers have programs that pay for medications. So I think in asking the ask the question, I have no problem asking a question, right. So we, I think asking for yourself is not going to hurt.

Mikki:

Okay. Well, Dr. Hoskins, we know the endometrial cancer outcomes among populations that are disadvantaged. How are you and your colleagues changing this?

Dr. Ebony Hoskins:

So disadvantaged populations could be patients who live in rural areas, patients with gender identity changes. So I think in terms of that, I think our Society of Gynecologic Oncology recognize it. I think number one, we have to recognize who the people are, and who these populations are. And then at least from our most recent annual meeting have noted more, talks that are about it. So it’s just more education that we are, seeing in, again, even more, some more data, particularly with patients that live in rural communities where they have lack of access to say a gynecologic oncologist, where they have to travel. And so I think one, recognizing it, and in terms of what’s being done I think there’s more to come. My activation tip for patients would be if you are in a disadvantaged population, perhaps inquiring with let’s say local groups that you are aligned to or even let’s say someone who may live in a rural community to figure out where they can get the best care that’s local to home. So, and I mean, these are things that we recognize that may be coming about soon. 


Share Your Feedback:

  Create your own user feedback survey