Tag Archive for: NSCLC patients

[ACT]IVATED NSCLC Biomarkers Resource Guide II en español

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Spanish ACTIVATED NSCLC Biomarkers Resource Guide_Drs. Sabari and Manley

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[ACT]IVATED NSCLC Biomarkers Resource Guide II

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ACTIVATED NSCLC_Biomarkers Resource Guide_Drs. Sabari and Manley

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[ACT]IVATED NSCLC Biomarkers Resource Guide en español

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Spanish ACTIVATED NSCLC Biomarkers Resource Guide

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[ACT]IVATED NSCLC Biomarkers Resource Guide

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ACTIVATED NSCLC Biomarkers Resource Guide

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[ACT]IVATED NSCLC Veterans Resource Guide en español

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Spanish ACTIVATED NSCLC Veterans Resource Guide

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[ACT]IVATED NSCLC Veterans Resource Guide

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ACTIVATED NSCLC Veterans Resource Guide

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Improving Biomarker Testing Access for Rural Lung Cancer Patients

Improving Biomarker Testing Access for Rural Lung Cancer Patients from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

What are the barriers for rural patients hoping to access biomarker tests? Dr. Samuel Cykert discusses the barriers for underrepresented lung cancer patients in rural areas face in accessing biomarker testing, citing issues like health insurance, economics, and language.

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Related Resources:

Enhancing Lung Cancer Care for Black and Latinx Patients | Tackling Challenges, Implementing Solutions

Enhancing Lung Cancer Care for Black and Latinx Patients | Tackling Challenges, Implementing Solutions

How Can We Advance Equitable Access to Precision Medicine in Lung Cancer Care?

How Can We Advance Equitable Access to Precision Medicine in Lung Cancer Care?

What Urgent Innovations Can Advance Lung Cancer Precision Medicine?

What Urgent Innovations Can Advance Lung Cancer Precision Medicine?

Transcript:

Lisa Hatfield:

Dr. Cykert, one of the main barriers preventing Black and Latinx patients with lung cancer in rural areas from accessing biomarker testing, and what steps can be taken to address these barriers, including improving awareness, affordability, and availability of testing facilities?

Dr. Samuel Cykert:

Yeah, great, great question. There are several issues here. One is the issue of rural, and the other issue is patients of color who may have barriers of health insurance, barriers of economics, barriers of education, and especially in the case of Latinx folks, barriers of language. So it really is a multiple question, but one thing for sure is we know from past studies that technology diffusion is slow and tends to get out to rural areas later than other areas, and the other problem is treatment volume in rural areas.

So a lot of rural hospitals don’t do bio specimen testing, don’t have the capability of doing that, and so you have this kind of double whammy of low volume testing plus low volume treatment, it’s well-known that surgeons who do more operations, for instance, do better. So given all those factors, I would recommend that rural patients who have presumptive diagnosis of lung cancer, even a suspicion of lung cancer, for instance, a large mass, a greater than 2 centimeter mass on an x-ray or a CT scan, that those patients ask to be referred to the closest high volume center.

I think that’s an important step, and we also have to have close interactions with our rural colleagues so that they’re comfortable of treating aggressively things that are well-treatable in the rural environment and going on to the high-volume centers, the more specialized centers, when things have to be done more aggressively.

When you look at a lot of different healthcare disparities, especially in advanced diseases, a lot of them come from being in areas where technology diffusion hasn’t happened and people don’t have access to the same treatments that they do at higher volume centers.  My activation tip here is, for things like biomarker testing and advanced treatments, you need to go to the closest high volume center.


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Enhancing Lung Cancer Care for Black and Latinx Patients | Tackling Challenges, Implementing Solutions

Enhancing Lung Cancer Care for Black and Latinx Patients | Tackling Challenges, Implementing Solutions from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

What are challenges and solutions to quality care for Black and Latinx non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients? Expert Dr. Samuel Cykert from UNC School of Medicine discusses challenges, solutions, and proactive patient advice toward quality care.

[ACT]IVATION TIP

“…for things like biomarker testing and advanced treatments, you need to go to the closest high volume center.”

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Related Resources:

Improving Biomarker Testing Access for Rural Lung Cancer Patients

Improving Biomarker Testing Access for Rural Lung Cancer Patients

How Can We Advance Equitable Access to Precision Medicine in Lung Cancer Care?

How Can We Advance Equitable Access to Precision Medicine in Lung Cancer Care?

What Urgent Innovations Can Advance Lung Cancer Precision Medicine?

What Urgent Innovations Can Advance Lung Cancer Precision Medicine?

Transcript:

Lisa Hatfield:

Dr. Cykert, what specific challenges do Black and Latinx patients with lung cancer often encounter in advocating for themselves within the healthcare system, and how can they navigate these challenges effectively to ensure they receive equitable and quality care?

Dr. Samuel Cykert:

Yes, and in our past research we discovered that there are certain implicit biases and communication biases that affect patients of color, and because of that, I think it’s really important to approach the clinical encounter with cancer care decision-makers with enthusiasm, that meaning making a direct statement that I’m very enthusiastic about getting care for my lung cancer, I’m very enthusiastic about biomarker testing, tailored therapy, surgery and research protocols. So please consider me for all those results, and I know what I said was just a mouthful.

And even if you can remember to just start with, I’m very enthusiastic about getting treatment, and biomarker testing would be good and I’m positive about it, how do you feel about it? Engage the clinician in the conversation so they really know that you’re part of the team and they’re part of the team, and you’re ready to move toward excellent treatment and you’re willing to consider even research stuff.


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Empowering Providers to Explain Lung Cancer Biomarker Testing to Patients

Empowering Providers to Explain Lung Cancer Biomarker Testing to Patients from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo

Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) clinician Dr. Jhanelle Gray from Moffitt Cancer Center has some knowledge to share. NSCLC expert Dr. Gray discusses her experience in biomarker testing and personalized combination therapeutics.

Watch to learn some of the best practices Dr. Gray has developed in treating and empowering NSCLC patients toward more culturally sensitive and equitable care.

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How Can Lung Cancer Experts in Academic and Community Settings Collaborate

How Can Lung Cancer Experts in Academic and Community Settings Collaborate

A Look at Lung Cancer Expert Learnings From Tumor Boards

A Look at Lung Cancer Expert Learnings From Tumor Boards

Methods to Improve Lung Cancer Physician-Patient Communication

Methods to Improve Lung Cancer Physician-Patient Communication

Transcript:

Dr. Jhanelle Gray:

My name is Dr. Jhanelle Gray, and I’m a clinical investigator focused on helping patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). My research has concentrated on evaluating novel molecular markers and developing cutting-edge, personalized combination therapeutics to improve the outcomes of patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

Biomarker testing is so important to explain to patients, and I’ve learned some best practices along the way. I think it’s very important that we take the time to think about patients when we’re making decisions, and to be open to the idea that people think differently. We all come from different backgrounds, we have different experiences. I think trying to have empathy, taking a pause, and intentionally being an active listener are very important when a patient is sitting in front of you.

We need to be careful when we use the words manage or managing. We’re not managing the patient, what we’re doing is managing the therapies, we’re helping to manage the symptoms that patients experience. We also want to take time to slow down, look at what is happening in the room as you’re talking, as the patient’s talking to you…

Language is something that is critically important. When you’re delivering negative news, people will remember about 10 percent of what you say. There’s a lot going on, so patience is very important, using words that can resonate and land, and being open to questions are key. Making sure that, again, that you don’t judge and remember that you’re delivering a lot of information. We also must share the news in a culturally sensitive way and understand the dynamics. Again, it’s reading  the room.

Understand that this is an individual conversation. When the next patient comes in, you’re going to tailor the conversation to that individual. When the next patient comes in, you’re going to tailor the conversation to that individual. 

There are also some things to keep in mind about management. Patients do not fail therapies, our therapies fail our patients. And even when you’re talking to patients, you need to let them know, this is one of the things that can occur. While the intention might be to prepare them for what can happen in the future, you may not realize during the conversation that this could come across as blaming. 

Training is one of the ways that you can move this forward and also just pay attention, be thoughtful, and make sure that people feel as comfortable as possible when you need to deliver difficult news. Another time this becomes very important, is when you need to change therapies.

For the patients, they had gotten accustomed to a therapy, they knew how to take care of themselves, how to work with their team, and had familiarity with the side effects. And now you’re going to pivot treatments. To patients, this often feels like starting over from scratch. Thus, I think there are many sensitivities that must be considered, and we need to be thoughtful at those particular times.

I think that all providers should undergo cultural competency training. This can drive impact and help move us to the next level of reaching for that equity and honestly, lessening the inequities in healthcare.

Some things I’ve learned about communicating biomarker results with patients include:

  • Seeing patients as human beings first and the cancer as second.
  • Pause and think about what you’re saying and how you’re saying it.
  • Take your time and don’t rush the appointment.
  • Get to know your patient as a person.

For me, these actions are key to empowering my patients.


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