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Finding Your Voice #patientchat Highlights

Last week, we hosted an Empowered #patientchat on finding your voice and what stops patients from seeking a second opinion.

A second opinion is crucial to prevent misdiagnosis or unnecessary procedures or surgeries. A study done by Mayo Clinic showed that as many as 88% of patients who get a second opinion go home with a new or refined diagnosis. That shows that only 12% of patients receive confirmation that their original diagnosis was complete and correct. Still, a lot of patients never get second opinions. So, we wanted to chat about this and see what the Empowered #patientchat community had to say, and these were the main takeaways:

The Top Tweets…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Full Chat

What Records Should You Bring For A Second Opinion Appointment?

From the Lung Cancer Town Meeting in September 2016, Janet Freeman-Daily interviews a panel of lung cancer experts about what are the essential records patients should bring to their appointment when getting a second opinion. The panel includes the following experts:

  • Nisha Monhindra, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine, Hematology/Oncology Division, Feinberg School of Medicine Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University
  • D. Ross Camidge, MD, PhD, Director Thoracic Oncology Clinical and Clinical Research Programs University of Colorado Denver
  • David D. Odell, MD, MMSc, Assistant Professor, Thoracic Surgery Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University
  • Timothy J. Kruser, MD, Assistant Professor, Radiation Oncology Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University

Check out the full video below to hear all of the experts advice.

What Records Should Your Bring For A Second Opinion Appointment? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Getting A Second Opinion From A Rural Location?

From a Town Meeting in September 2016, Janet Freeman-Daily interviews a panel of cancer experts about how patients in rural or remote locations can get second or multidisciplinary opinions from larger facilities or academic institutes. The panel includes the following experts:

  • Nisha Monhindra, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine, Hematology/Oncology Division, Feinberg School of Medicine Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University
  • D. Ross Camidge, MD, PhD, Director Thoracic Oncology Clinical and Clinical Research Programs University of Colorado Denver
  • David D. Odell, MD, MMSc, Assistant Professor, Thoracic Surgery Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University
  • Timothy J. Kruser, MD, Assistant Professor, Radiation Oncology Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University

Check out the full video below to hear all the experts advice.

 

Getting A Second Opinion From A Rural Location? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

How to Prepare for a Second Opinion Doctor Appointment

Expert physicians and cancer patients agree that getting a second opinion is crucial, even if you are very pleased with your primary medical team. It is your health and your life; take care of yourself!

A second opinion will help you learn more about your illness and treatment options. What you learn also will help you communicate intelligently with your medical team to get the best, most personalized care.

But doctor appointments can be scary, overwhelming and intimidating. There is the possibility of bad news and the apprehension of receiving confusing an difficult-to-understand information. Here are some tips to help you make the most of your second opinion appointment.

Prepare in advance

Plan to take a trusted friend or family member with you

This is critical. Memory retention is only 10% and less when you are stressed. You will not remember everything that is said during the appointment. You need to have someone there with you to be ‘another set of eyes and ears’. Then you can discuss key points with this other person to make sure you both heard the same information, go over options, and, if appropriate, ask for their input and opinion,

Record the conversation

Ask the doctor if you can record the conversation. Pull out your smartphone and record it! Then you can play it back at your leisure and discuss it with your family and the person who accompanied you to the appointment. You can then go over key issues, play back critical discussions and not miss anything!

By the way, many expert physicians have endorsed the idea of recording the discussion at a doctor appointment so don’t be afraid to ask!

Think of questions to ask and write them down ahead of time

No one thinks and speaks at the same time and does it effectively. And stress adds to the mix. So plan ahead and write your questions down to prepare yourself for the appointment. For example:

  • Confirmation of diagnosis
  • What are the next steps?
  • Am I eligible for a clinical trial?
  • What are my treatment options and does the second opinion doctor agree with the original treatment options?
  • What are the side effects of the treatment options?

If a clinical trial is advisable, you can ask these questions:

  • What is the purpose of the study?
  • Who is sponsoring the study, and who has reviewed and approved it?
  • What kinds of tests, medicines, surgery, or devices are involved? Are any procedures painful?
  • What are the possible risks, side effects, and benefits of taking part in the study?
  • How might this trial affect my daily life? Will I have to be in the hospital?
  • How long will the trial last?
  • Who will pay for the tests and treatments I receive?
  • Will I be reimbursed for other expenses (for example, travel and child care)?
  • Who will be in charge of my care?
  • What will happen after the trial?

Bottom line: You do not need to become a medical expert in your disease. By following the guidelines above, you can become more knowledgeable to make informed decisions about your path to improved health and quality of life.

 

 

Getting a Second Opinion

“Get a second opinion!”

This is important! Who doesn’t get a second opinion when having work done on their car or house? Isn’t your body and health more important!

Go to a specialist and get a second opinion. Travel the distance if need be. Your health is so important. You don’t have to be followed up on every visit by a specialist if you live far away, but you owe it to yourself and your loved ones to have a specialist on hand as the “architect” of your healthcare treatment plan. Cancer is a serious disease and the specialists see only cancer patients day-in and day-out – they are the ones who keep up with the latest news and treatment options. They are the ones who have access to clinical trials and can let you know all the options there.

Watch the following video from our recent town meeting for lung cancer patients and listen to the panel discuss the importance of getting a second opinion:

Getting a Second Opinion from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.