Daily Practices for Cultivating Awareness and Anchoring Yourself in Resilience

Resilience is our capacity to bounce back from the inevitable challenges of being alive. When challenges arise, our meandering minds can take us into various worrisome directions, leading to a host of negative emotional states and their subsequent adverse effects on our well-being.

Although we may not have control over the external factors in our lives or needless to say our genetic predispositions, we do have the capacity to cultivate inner psychological faculties that enable us to weather the storms of life with relative calm. For most of us, these internal resources are underdeveloped. They require intentional cultivation through the regular practice of actions that support their development. Among these inner resources are self-awareness, self-acceptance, and a secure inner base to fall back on.

What is Resilience?

What is Resilience? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Anchoring the Mind

Anchoring the Mind from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Focusing the attention on the natural breathing process and body cultivates self-awareness and tends to have a calming effect on the mind. By doing so non-judgmentally, we accept the process as it is truly experienced. This is not an advocation of apathy towards our lives. To the contrary, by shining the light of awareness on our experience and accepting it as it truly is, we are given a clarity from which to make any necessary course corrections in our lives.

Awareness of Breath

Awareness of Breath from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Awareness of Body

Awareness of Body from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

A secure base is supported by continually returning our attention to our breath and body when distracted by the meandering nature of the mind. By regularly practicing the activities here offered you can enhance your capacity to bounce back and calmly weather the fluctuating trials of life.


Broderick Rodell has a PhD in chemical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology and a Doctorate of Naturopathic Medicine from Bastyr University. His search for self-betterment led to his passion for mindfulness. He considers himself a dedicated student and practitioner of yoga including contemplation, meditation, breath work, and mindful movement. Broderick believes that through individual evolution we can all tap into greater possibilities within ourselves.

PEN-Powered Activity Guide

LBBC: How Diagnosis May Impact Your Emotions

This was originally published by Living Beyond Breast Cancer here.


Practical Concerns

At the beginning, your doctors are giving you a lot of new medical information. You might feel overwhelmed and wonder how you will ever make sense of everything. Practical concerns about health insurance, keeping track of your medical records, getting transportation to and from appointments, and adjusting your home and work life to accommodate treatments may also be worrying you. Think about who you can turn to for help with these tasks.

You may feel pressure, from yourself or from others, to start treatment quickly. This could cause you to worry that you don’t have enough time to gather and process the information you need. Remember that in most cases, breast cancer treatment is not an emergency and taking time to make your decisions is OK.

Start by talking with your care team about a timeline for treatment. Get clarity about how long you can take to make decisions. Take this time to learn more about your diagnosis and treatment options, and to gather the people you want around you for support. Taking time to understand your options may give you confidence. Once you have a solid plan, you will likely feel less uncertain. Taking action may help you feel calmer and in control.

You may also be concerned about how your treatment will affect your or your family’s day-to-day life. You may worry about keeping your job, income, or health insurance if you have to take time off from work. Make a list of the things that worry you and share them with your provider. He or she may be able to direct you to resources that will help you manage money, job and insurance concerns.

Also share your list of practical concerns — whether transportation, child care or food shopping — with your personal support team. Remember, people want to help and giving them a job will make them feel better as well.

Starting Treatment

As you develop a plan and transition toward treatment, the feelings you had right after your diagnosis may lessen or change. Once you have a plan, you may feel more hopeful and grounded. Many women feel better when treatments begin because they know the therapy is working to get rid of the cancer.

Surgerychemotherapytargeted therapyhormonal therapy, and radiation therapy can prompt strong or mixed emotions, too. Perhaps you dread starting treatment and worry about side effects. Share your concerns with your care team before treatment begins. They can address your fears and suggest ways to manage or even prevent some side effects.