Is Treatment Adherence & Socioeconomic Disparities in Myeloma Creating Roadblocks to Best Care?

A Diverse Health Hub #NewsyNugget

How Can Myeloma Patients Facing Disparities Be More Proactive in Their Care?

Dr. Victoria Vardell of Huntsman Cancer Institute discusses her study where key findings reveal underserved myeloma patient populations are less likely to receive a stem cell transplant (SCT). Vardell encourages patients to ask questions of their providers until they have a complete understanding so they can make the most informed decisions in their myeloma care. Watch the complete interview below.

Myeloma Treatment: Black patients less likely to receive SCT

ASH 2019 Study: Here

Speak Up: Patients should ask questions until they understand in order to make more informed treatment decisions

Does Treatment Adherence in Myeloma Impact Outcomes?

Myeloma expert Dr. Sikander Ailawadhi of Mayo Clinic breaks down the importance of treatment adherence and disease management in multiple myeloma in order to get the maximum benefit. In Dr. Ailawadhi’s own words: “In myeloma it has been shown again and again, if you use the right treatment for the right duration and you get a deep response, you are more likely to do better.” Watch the complete interview below.

Myeloma Treatment: staying on regimen long enough for deepest response is important

Treatment Adherence: a known issue in multiple myeloma and many cancers

Treatment Duration: staying on the right treatment for full duration coupled with deep response is key


Diverse Health Hub and the Patient Empowerment Network will partner to produce ongoing educational programs in 2020. 

ASH 2019: Disparities Around Accessing Health Technology Revealed for a Subset of Myeloma Patients

In this Diverse Health Hub interview, Dr. Sikander Ailawadhi of Mayo Clinic, discusses disparities around access to care in multiple myeloma from the 61st American Society of Hematology (ASH) Meeting in Orlando, Florida.

About Diverse Health Hub:

Diverse Health Hub is a health equity education and awareness channel producing educational content for both patients and providers in order to bridge the gaps between healthcare practices and the needs of multicultural communities.  Diverse Health Hub works directly with a diverse patient and respected provider population in multiple therapeutic areas to promote cultural competence in healthcare. The organization believes access to these diverse perspectives cultivates culturally competent communities.

Related Programs:

Good News for Future of Myeloma Treatment, Still Addressing Race-Associated Risks

ASH 2019: Multiple Regimens, Deeper Responses in Multiple Myeloma Treatment

Triage Cancer’s Quick Guide to Health Insurance: Employer-Sponsored & Individual Plans

2019-Health-Insurance-Employer-Individual-Plans-Quick-Guide-rev

Triage Cancer’s Quick Guide to Health Insurance: Medicare

2019-Health-Insurance-Medicare-Quick-Guide-Final

Financial Assistance Programs

These resources were originally published by Myeloma Crowd here.

Financial Resources

Before starting treatment, patients and their caregivers should meet with the financial counselor at the facility where they will be treated. Each hospital will have its own financial counselor within each specific clinic (like the myeloma clinic or myeloma/lymphoma clinic). The counselor will help determine coverage and estimate out of pocket costs. There may be restrictions on treatment options covered by Medicare and Medicaid. After you have met with the counselor, the resources below can help bridge financial gaps.

Myeloma advocate and financial planner Diahanna Valentine helped compile this list of helpful financial resources. To contact Diahanna for professional assistance, email her at dtvallentine@gmail.com

Pharmaceutical Company Patient Assistance Programs

Amgen Assist 360  (1-800-28-AMGEN) (Kyprolis, Xgeva, Neupogen, Neulasta)

BMS Access Support (1-800-861-0048) (Empliciti)

Celgene Patient Support (1-800-931-8691, EXT 4077(Revlimid, Pomalyst, Thalomid)

Genentech  (1-888-941-3331) (Venclexta)

(800-609-1083) (Doxil, Darzalex)

Novartis Patient Assistance (1-800-245-5356) (Farydak, Zometa)

Takeda Oncology (1-844-817-6468) (Ninlaro, Velcade)

Other Patient Assistance Programs

Be The Match (Post-transplant financial assistance)

CancerCare

CephalonCares Foundation

HealthWell Foundation

Help with Paying Bills

The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s Co-pay Assistance Program

Patient Financial Aid

The Max Foundation

National Cancer Institute

National Organization for Rare Disorders

NeedyMeds

Patient Access Network Foundation

Patient Advocate Foundation

Patient Advocate Foundation Co-Pay Relief Program

Ronald McDonald House Charities

Basic Living Expenses

American Childhood Cancer Organization

American Life Fund
The Bone Marrow Foundation

The CHAIN Fund Inc

Child Care Expenses

Family Reach Foundation

The Bone Marrow Foundation

CancerCare

Equipment /Supplies Expenses

American Kidney Fund

CancerCare

Lymphoma Research Foundation

Stupid Cancer

Government Assistance

Benefits.gov

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

Eligibility.com (Medicare Resources)

Legal Services Corporation

Social Security Administration

Social Security Disability Resource Center

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

Home Health Care Assistance

AVON Foundation for Women

The Bone Marrow Foundation

CancerCare

Brenda Mehling Cancer Fund

Stupid Cancer

Housing During Treatment

American Cancer Society (Hope Lodges)

The Bone Marrow Foundation

Healthcare Hospitality Network Inc

Hospitality Homes

Joe’s House

Lymphoma Research Foundation

Insurance Premium Expenses

American Kidney Fund (dialysis patients)

American Life Fund

The Bone Marrow Foundation

CancerCare Co-Payment Assistance Foundation

The CHAIN Fund Inc

Fifth Season Financial Assistance

HealthWell Foundation (diagnosis-specific)

Patient Advocate Foundation Co-Pay Relief

Patient Services, Inc

Stupid Cancer

Legal Issues

American Bar Association

Cancer and Careers

Cancer Legal Resource Center

LawHelp.org

Legal Services Corporation

National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship

National Health Law Program(links to assistance programs)

Patient Advocate Foundation

Social Security Disability Resource Center

Medical Care Expenses

American Life Fund

Be the Match

The Bone Marrow Foundation

CancerCare

Cancer Warrior, Inc

Fifth Season Financial Assistance

Foundation for Health Coverage Education

Leukemia and Lymphoma Society

Patient Access Network Foundation

Patient Advocate Foundation

Post Treatment Financial Needs

Be The Match

Stupid Cancer

Prescription Expenses

The Bone Marrow Foundation

CancerCare Co-Payment Assistance Foundation

Cancer Financial Assistance Coalition

The CHAIN Fund Inc

Foundation for Health Coverage Education

GoodDays

HealthWell Foundation

Leukemia and Lymphoma Society

Needy Meds

Patient Access Network Foundation

Patient Advocate Foundation Co-Pay Relief

RxAssist

RxHope

RxOutreach

Together Rx Access

Transportation and Travel Resources

Angel Flight

Air Charity Network

American Cancer Society (Road to Recovery)

Angel Airline Samaritans

Angel Airlines for Cancer Patientsrg

Angel Flight Central

CancerCare

Chai Lifeline

Corporate Angel Network

Family Reach Foundation

Lifeline Pilots

Lymphoma Research Foundation

Mercy Medical Angels

National Patient Travel Center

Veterans Airlife Command

Co-pay Assistance Programs & Concerns – Myeloma

This video was originally published by Myeloma.org on Mar 31, 2017, here.

Recently, the International Myeloma Foundation’s InfoLine has been flooded with calls from patients and caregivers facing insurmountable financial challenges due to the high cost of drugs and increases in insurance copays. In the past, several services have been available to provide financial assistance to patients. We understand that funds for co-pay assistance are difficult to come by, and available funding will likely dry up quickly.

DOWNLOAD SLIDES

Financial Assistance: Filling in the gaps

This blog was originally published on Bone Marrow & Cancer Foundation here.

Lifeline Fund

The Lifeline Fund provides support to patients who often lack the financial resources necessary to afford the often overlooked living and ancillary expenses that can present considerable financial obstacles—or prohibit the transplant altogether. Funding from the Bone Marrow & Cancer Foundation’s Lifeline Fund helps to cover the myriad costs associated with transplants, such as donor searches, compatibility testing, bone marrow harvesting, medications, home and childcare services, medical equipment, transportation, cord blood banking, housing, and other expenses associated with the transplant. Health insurance often does not cover these vital support services, and many patients cannot afford them on their own.

Open Homes Medical Stays

Our partnership with Airbnb’s Open Homes Medical Stays program provides free temporary accommodations to patients diagnosed with any form of cancer or undergoing a hematopoietic stem cell transplant, as well as housing for their caregivers, family members, and donors.

One-to-One Funds

A One-to-One Fund is a personal fund created for a specific patient. It is a simple and effective way for a patient’s family, friends, and community to raise money on a patient’s behalf with all money raised going directly to their benefit. All donations are tax-deductible. The Bone Marrow & Cancer Foundation administers and maintains the fund, and can offer support with fundraising ideas.

Scholarship Grants

Scholarship Grants help make educational aspirations a reality for bone marrow, stem cell and cord blood transplant survivors. Transplants affect all aspects of life and often prohibit the pursuit of educational opportunities. To address this, the Bone Marrow & Cancer Foundation offers survivors support towards an academic future so their hopes and dreams remain intact. Scholarship Grants support students of all ages as they pursue their educational goals.

Access To Healthcare As A Human Right

One of the keys to health literacy is understanding your role, as a patient, in the care delivery process chain: learning what you need to know to ask questions that can help clarify decisions with your clinical team; how to assess the information you’re given to understand what you need to do, or to consider, as next steps in your treatment journey; who to consult for expert input and guidance to fact-check, and gut-check, the information you’re processing and the decisions you’re making.

It’s a lot, particularly when you’re dealing with the impact of what I (and Firesign Theater) like to call “a really big disease.” It’s even more – way beyond “a lot” – if you have to also fight for the right to access treatment for your diagnosis.

This may seem like a problem that belongs to someone in a developing country, not one that happens in the USA, but that’s not the case, far too often. In America, a person given a diagnosis of cancer, or of Parkinson’s disease, or any other “really big” condition, not only has to navigate learning all about that condition, but also has to figure out how to pay for the treatment for it.

In a recent survey from West Health and Gallup, some alarming stats surfaced about Americans and access to medical care:

  • 45% of people surveyed feared bankruptcy if they had a major health event (“really big disease” or accident)
  • 77% feared that rising costs will significantly damage the U.S. economy
  • More than 3 million people borrowed more than $10,000 to cover medical expenses in the past year

Which brings me to my main point here – access to medical care is, I believe, a basic human right. If the system that’s providing your care has been priced out of your reach, and you wind up bankrupting yourself, and your family, to access care, is that really “care,” or a symptom of a broken system?

Sure, the doctors and nurses, as well as the hospitals and clinics where they work, deserve to be compensated for their work. I’m not suggesting that medical care be free. What I am suggesting is that, in the US at least, the goal of the “system” has been to protect the status quo – the revenue stream, which at last official count (2017, from the US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services) was $3.5 trillion, of which about $1 trillion is estimated to be waste. Does that sound like a healthcare system, or a RICO scheme? Asking for millions of friends.

Until we, as a nation, confront this issue of access to medical care, and the inequity of access caused by the “chaos behind a veil of secrecy” that marks the pricing of that access, we’ll be stuck in the loop we’ve been in since the end of WWII, when Harry Truman tried to initiate a national healthcare program and got beaten up on the White House lawn by Congress, and the American Medical Association.

America is founded on the idea that every person has a right to “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” It’s hard to have life, or liberty, or happiness without access to healthcare. Let’s live up to our founding principles, and guarantee healthcare access to all. Anything less, and we’re betraying the American promise.

Patient Assistance Programs (PAPs)

Patient Assistance Programs: A Guide for Patients

Cancer is costly. Each year, it costs $180 billion in health care expenses and loss of productivity, says the American Cancer Society. For individuals, it is the life-saving medications they need that can cost the most. According to cancer.gov, 90 percent of Americans say that cancer drugs are too expensive, and the prices have been steadily increasing for the last twenty years. Some cancer drugs debut on the market at a cost of more than $100,000 per patient per year, some for as much as $400,000. With this type of pricing, even insured patients can be facing out-of-pocket expenses in the tens of thousands.

When patients can’t afford their medications, it can lead to people taking them in lower doses or skipping them altogether, and that can lead to serious consequences, such as shortened survival times. High-cost medications can also lead to financial ruin for some patients. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patient James Miller, whose copay for his experimental and life-saving medication is “outrageously expensive” at $790 a month, says that, medications could eventually bankrupt people, especially if the medications are a patient’s only option for survival.

It’s literally a matter of life or death for patients like Miller to find funding solutions for their cancer drugs. Luckily for him, his medication is covered through the manufacturer’s Patient Assistance Program. Drug manufactures created Patient Assistant Programs, commonly known as PAPs, to provide qualifying patients with free or discounted medications.

While just about every manufacturer has an assistance program, one of the first manufacturers to offer a PAP was AstraZeneca. Company representative Colleen Kempf says, AstraZeneca began offering patient assistance over 40 years ago. The program now covers the company’s marketed medicines, and Kempf says, in the past ten years, the company has helped over 4 million patients with access to medications. “Our programs are driven by our corporate value in putting patients first. We believe that we have a role to play to support patients, and since 2005 have expressed this commitment in a very public way through our advertising.” Their PAP slogan, “If you can’t afford your medications, AstraZeneca may be able to help,” might be familiar to many as it is frequently heard at the end of its television adds and leads patients to its website which is where most PAP information can be found.

Find a PAP

The most important thing to know about PAPs is that they are available. They all vary a bit and have different names, but chances are, your drug’s manufacturer has one. AstraZeneca’s is called AZ&ME. Genentech, the manufacturer of the medication Miller takes for his CLL, calls its program Genentech Access. Celgene refers to its as Patient Support, and Takeda refers to its as Help at Hand.

Once you know assistance is available, it’s fairly easy to find it. All it takes is an online search of the name of the drug, coupled with the words “patient assistance program”, and you should be well on your way to the application process.

John Rosenguard, a multiple myeloma patient, learned about PAPs while doing research about insurance carriers. In addition, Celgene, the manufacturer of his medication, led him to its assistance program through an online risk management survey he was required to take when he was prescribed the medication.

There are also websites specifically designed to help patients find assistance. Non-profit website needymeds.org was formed in 1997 with the intent of helping patients navigate PAPs. Now a partner with Patient Empowerment Network (PEN), the vast NeedyMeds database of PAPs can be searched using the link below. All you have to do is enter the drug name to discover whether or not a PAP is available.

 

 

While it may seem like the best place to learn about PAPs is the internet, patients and drug companies both recommend you include talking to your healthcare provider about options. Miller learned about the Genentech PAP he uses through his doctor who put him in touch with a specialty pharmacy who provided him with a PAP application. Miller says he would not have known about the PAP on his own, but that without it he would “go broke”. He advises other patients to ask their treating physicians about options. “Any doctor prescribing an experimental drug like that will have a relationship with a specialty pharmacy,” he says.

Miller’s advice is good, but most people don’t seem to be following it, according to cancer.gov, which reports that only 27 percent of cancer patients, and less than half of oncologists, say that they have had cost-related discussions. But, nearly 66 percent of the patients say they want to talk to their doctors about costs. They should.

AstraZeneca’s Kempf says the company ensures that healthcare providers, patients, and patient groups are made aware of its AZ&ME assistance program. “As with any type of information or program, providers will have different levels of understanding regarding available PAP programs,” says Kempf. “The AZ&ME program works closely with healthcare provider offices on applications at their request and we’ve also seen some offices support their patients by assisting with the enrollment process for their patients.”

PAP Enrollment

Each company has a different process for enrolling in its PAP. Some applications require extensive financial information, while others require basic information; Some require doctors to fill out a portion of the application, while others only need a signed prescription. Miller says for the Genentech enrollment process, he had to provide his financial information and that the application had two or three pages for his doctor to fill out. Rosenguard says the Celgene application process was extremely simple and that it took about two weeks for him to be accepted into the program.

The best way to know what the enrollment process is for the manufacturer of your medication is to go to the company website. The websites are easy and straightforward for patients to navigate. For example, the Celgene Patient Support site has large buttons that say “Enroll now” and “Financial Help”. The words are in big, bold type, and each step is written in clear language. The site also provides a phone number, email, and fax information. There is an option to download the application form if you prefer to print it and fill it out by hand. The steps you will take are listed clearly, and what you need to include with the application is listed clearly. The process was easy and efficient, says Rosenguard.

 

Most applicants shouldn’t require any assistance beyond what the manufacturers can provide on their websites or by phone, but there are some businesses who will help patients complete the enrollment process for a fee. The prices vary, as does the quality of service.

PAP Qualification

Not all patients will qualify for assistance. While each program has its own qualifying criteria, and there may be different requirements for different medications produced by the same manufacturer, in general, to qualify for a PAP, a patient must:

  • Have very limited or no drug coverage from public or private sources
  • Must demonstrate a financial need based on a set income and assets
  • Provide proof of US residence or citizenship.

“The AZ&ME program is intended to serve patients most in need and has income eligibility criteria that speak to this design,” says Kempf. “The program primarily serves patients that have no insurance coverage or patients that face affordability challenges with their Medicare cost-sharing requirements.”

In addition, the amount of assistance a patient receives and the length of time each patient can stay on the program varies. AZ&ME patients without insurance are required to reenroll in the program annually, and Medicare patients are required to reenroll at the start of each calendar year.

“It is important for patients to understand the eligibility requirements as well as the documentation requirements that are typically associated with applications,” says Kempf. “Ensuring that the application is filled out, complete, and submitted with the required documents, helps ensure an easy enrollment process.”

PAP Basics

Once accepted into the program, both Miller and Rosenguard say that there is not much of a time commitment from them. They both receive their medication through a specialty pharmacy. Miller says his is delivered to his door each month, and Rosenguard says he is able to refill his prescription online, and also has a monthly follow up phone call with the pharmacy. In addition, Rosenguard is required to follow risk management guidelines to participate in the Celgene PAP. Guidelines, as specified by Celgene include, following safe sex practices, not donating blood, and monitoring cuts with blood loss.

AstraZeneca also uses a central pharmacy to dispense its medications to patients, says Kempf. “All medications are dispensed by a pharmacy and are sent directly to the patient’s home unless it is a medication that requires in-office administration by the physician. In office administration products are sent directly to the healthcare practitioner,” she says.

Are PAPs Worth It?

For patients struggling to pay for their medications PAPs may be the only option, and the pharmaceutical companies seem committed to providing the service. Kempf says that at AstraZeneca, they are always evaluating patient feedback to see how they can better serve patients, including streamlining the application process.

Rosenguard recommends the PAP programs. He says, co-pays, like his that were $200 a month per medication, can add up quickly. “The benefits were noticeable and met my needs to control costs over the long term,” says Rosenguard. “Plus, it educated me to help others (employees, support group members, friends) who might need this information in the future.”

How Medicare Covers Cancer in 2019

Cancer is a much more common disease than we’d like to believe. According to the National Cancer Institute, 38.4% of the people in the United States will be diagnosed with some kind of cancer during their lifetime – that’s 125,068,800 people out of our current population.

Some of the most prevalent forms of cancers among seniors are breast cancer, colon cancer, and lung cancer. Because aging can bring a higher risk factor for certain cancers, it’s important you know how well Medicare covers cancer. Fortunately, Medicare covers cancer quite well.

Common Cancer Treatments and Services

First, let’s talk about treatments and services that most cancer patients receive. This will help you to understand how specific procedures are covered under Medicare. Below is a short list of treatments, services, procedures, etc. that cancer patients may receive.

  • Chemotherapy
  • DME (durable medical equipment)
  • Hospice
  • In-patient hospital stays
  • Medications
  • Oncologist visits
  • Radiation
  • Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF) care
  • Surgery

It’s true that Medicare covers most treatments, procedures, and services needed for managing cancer, but you need to know more than that. You should learn how each service is covered and how much you’ll pay for it.

While it’s hard to know for sure how much you will pay down to the cent due to certain factors, you can at least get a ballpark estimate of what you can expect to spend.

Medicare Part A Coverage

In short, Medicare Part A covers your in-patient hospital stays. In addition, stays at an SNF and hospice care are also covered under Part A among a few other things.

This may not seem like much for an entire part of Medicare to cover; however, if you think about how expensive these services are, it’s easier to understand. Also, depending on how recently you have left the hospital, there are times that Part A could cover things like DME and home health care too.

Costs Under Part A

Like all other parts of Medicare, Part A has a deductible. However, you will soon learn the Medicare Part A deductible is unlike any other deductible in Medicare. Most deductibles are annual; however, Part A’s deductible is per benefit period.

What this means is that if you go to the hospital multiple times a year, you could experience multiple benefit periods, and that means you could pay the Part A deductible more than once a year. As of 2019, the Part A deductible is $1,364.

The $1,364 deductible pays for your first 60 days in the hospital. If you stay in the hospital for more than 60 days, you will owe a daily copay. The daily copay for Part A start at $341 and increases to $682 after day 90.

The deductible also covers your first 20 days in an SNF if your doctor sends you to one to finish out your recovery. If your SNF stay is longer than 20 days, you will pay a daily copay of $170.50.

All costs after 150 days in the hospital or 100 days in an SNF are your responsibility.

Medicare Part B Coverage

Medicare Part B covers your outpatient services, treatments, procedures, and then some. They even cover some things while you’re in the hospital. Things like chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, and oncologist visits are all examples of things that can be covered under Part B.

Costs Under Part B

Medicare Part B has a monthly premium that is based on your income. Most people pay $135.50 each month in 2019 for Part B. The annual deductible for Part B in 2019 is $185.

Once you have paid your deductible, Part B will cover 80% of the cost for Medicare-covered services and treatments, like the ones listed above. The other 20% of the cost is your responsibility. Sometimes you can incur Part B charges while you are in the hospital, such as when a physician performs an outpatient surgery or you are using a hospital facility to get a diagnostic imaging scan, which is covered under Part B.

Let’s look at an example. Joe goes to the hospital for a minimally invasive surgery. He stays in the hospital overnight for observation. He will pay his Part A deductible of $1,364, his Part B deductible of $185, and 20% of the cost for the surgery and any other Part B services provided to him while in the hospital.

Medicare Plans That Can Help

Just from that one surgery, Joe could be paying thousands of dollars out-of-pocket. However, if he had a Medicare plan, he could be better protected from having to empty out his wallet.

Medigap Plans

Medicare Supplement plans, also known as Medigap plans, help cover the patients from having to spend so much out-of-pocket. A Medigap plan could potentially eliminate all of the costs that Joe would normally have to cover himself.

A few Medigap plans that could help Joe immensely are Plan F, Plan G, and Plan N. Plan F would cover everything mentioned above, while Plan G would cover everything except the $185 Part B deductible.

Most people only get one opportunity to enroll in a Medigap plan with guaranteed approval. So, if you have been diagnosed with cancer before becoming eligible for Medicare, you should enroll in a Medigap plan during this one-time open enrollment window.

Medicare Advantage Plans

Because Medigap plans usually have a higher premium, some people elect a Medicare Advantage plan instead. As long as you have one or the other you will be able to have extra coverage.

Medicare Advantage plans provide extra coverage in a few ways such as providing additional benefits, offering lower copays, and including a maximum out-of-pocket. In 2019, the set maximum out-of-pocket spending limit is $6,700 for in-network services.

This means, even if you can’t afford a Medigap plan, you will at least be covered from spending more than $6,700 for in-network services in any given year.

It takes some research to decide whether a Medicare Advantage or Medigap plan is the right fit for you, so make sure you learn how each type of coverage works before you choose a plan.

Medicare Part D Coverage

Part D is the part of Medicare that is in charge of your drug coverage – well, most of it anyway. There are some cases in which Part B would cover your medications, but we will get into that in a little bit.

Costs Under Part D

Each Part D plan has a premium. Currently, the national average for Part D monthly premiums is $35. You also have an annual deductible included in your Part D drug plan. In 2019, the maximum deductible a plan can set is $415.

After you have met your deductible you will move into the second stage of your Part D plan called the initial coverage stage. During this stage, you will pay copays for drugs covered under your plan. The copay you pay for any given drug depends on the tier the plan has the drug classified as.

After you and the carrier together have spent $3,820, you will move into the coverage gap. During this stage, you will pay a specified percentage depending on what type of drug it is, brand-name or generic.

Once your out-of-pocket spending hits $5,100, you’ll move into the catastrophic coverage stage which is the stage you will remain in until January 1st. In the catastrophic coverage stage, you will pay no more than 5 percent of your drug costs.

Drugs Covered Under Part B

Medicare Part B covers medications that are administered to you in a medical office setting. For example, chemotherapy is administered to you, therefore, Part B covers it, not Part D.

Think of Part D as your drug coverage for prescriptions you pick up at the pharmacy yourself. However, even Part B covers some of those.

Better Safe Than Sorry

We hear all the time, unfortunately, of how someone didn’t get Medicare Part D when they were first eligible because they weren’t taking any medications at that time. Well later, come to find out, they have been diagnosed with cancer and now must wait until the fall election period to enroll in a Part D drug plan.

Since they waited, not only will they have a lifelong late penalty tacked onto their premium, they have to pay 100% out-of-pocket from their medications until they get enrolled in a plan.

The potential of being diagnosed with cancer is also a reason why you should enroll in a Medigap plan when you are first eligible. Like we mentioned earlier, if you wait until it’s too late, you will be denied coverage due to your diagnosis. It’s always better to be safe than sorry.

 

How to Pay for Long-term Care on a Fixed Budget

Long-term care costs are rising yearly, and with more people approaching age 65+ than ever before, the rates are not expected to fall. Not everyone plans ahead and unfortunately, we cannot know for certain when someone will begin to need long-term care, as it varies case by case. For the elderly population specifically, many individuals begin long-term-care after a sudden life change that renders them incapable of caring for themselves, like a stroke or a fall. In the best-case scenario for a stroke or a fall, patients return home after successful rehabilitation. However, as unfortunate as it may be, many individuals are unable to return to their former health.

Sometimes, there is no sudden change and it is simply advanced age that is the main factor determining whether or not a person can safely remain independent. When someone does begin to need-long-term care, depending upon the severity of the person’s situation, they are either taken care of by professional caregivers, family members, or moved into an institutional setting. Statistically speaking, about 80% of elderly people who need long-term care receive services within their own home or the home of a family member. The remaining 20% move into facilities, specially designed to accommodate a wide range of needs. Regardless of where we choose to spend our twilight years, there are costs involved. Below, I’ll outline some common ways people are able to fund their long-term care.

What Exactly is Long-term Care?

Long-term care simply refers to the type of assistance provided to people with cognitive or functional limitations to help them perform daily activities. If patients are unable to return safely home after a hospital stay, facilities continue rehabilitation to try and strengthen patients and improve their quality of life. The more a resident can do by himself or herself (eating, using the bathroom, bathing, and changing), the happier they generally are.

According to the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey, the elderly population in nursing homes has declined over the past ten years. Through more advanced rehabilitation practices and an increased availability to services, the majority of long-term care recipients are able to live with loved ones, in assisted living, or group homes if they do not need the intensive 24hour supervision that comes along with nursing home residence. Nevertheless, the question still remains: how to pay for the care you need.

Medicaid Long-term Care:

For many people, Medicaid is the best option when it comes time to pay for long-term care. If your loved one meets certain medical and financial requirements, or they are already receiving SSI benefits, they may be eligible. For most states, the monthly income limit is around $2,200 and the asset limit is $2,000. For Arizona specifically, the monthly income limit is $2,205. Anything beyond these values needs to be spent towards care or the applicant may be ineligible. The medical eligibility is stringent and the recipient can only live in Medicaid approved homes or receive Medicaid approved services in the community. Even with all of the requirements, this is still the best option for many families. For up-to-date Medicaid information, follow this link.

Long-term Care Insurance:

Although a person may have paid for medical insurance their whole life, medical insurance companies do not cover long-term care. There is, however, such a thing as long-term care insurance. There are different policies with different features, but generally, a person pays a monthly premium and when long-term care services are needed, the policy will pay out a certain amount, usually in the hundreds of thousands. Similar to life insurance, premiums are cheaper if the person buying insurance is young and healthy. Those already in need of long-term care services are not able to get coverage. Although these policies do not last forever, the payout is usually sufficient for the entire cost of care.

Sometimes, however, the care outlasts the insurance coverage. Don’t worry because many states have what is called a long-term care insurance partnership, useful when people spend through their policy and need to apply for Medicaid coverage. The partnership is a program between the state and private insurance companies. Partnership policies protect assets by reciprocating dollar for dollar what policyholders pay into their policies. For example, if you bought a Partnership Policy with a maximum benefit payout of $200,000, you are able to protect $200,000 of your assets. For married couples each spouse needs to purchase their own policy.

Once the original long-term care insurance coverage is exhausted, you may apply for Medicaid with the benefit pay out’s worth of assets exempted. This is extremely beneficial because again, most states have an asset limit of $2,000. In addition to the asset limit, Medicaid penalizes people who have given away or sold property below fair market value within the five years preceding the need for long-term care assistance.

Qualified Income Trust:

If an individual is over the financial limit for Medicaid long-term care coverage, some states allow applicants to spend down income towards medical care while others allow the creation of Qualified Income Trusts, also known as Miller Trusts. Miller Trusts place any income beyond the state’s limit into a trust, designating the state Medicaid program as the beneficiary once the long-term care recipient dies. The problem many people have with spend-down and Qualified Income Trusts is that for the most part, all assets and income eventually go towards care. Long-term care insurance, as described above, helps prevent the complete drain of assets for people who are hoping to leave behind a legacy.

Reverse Mortgage:

Another option that has gained popularity in recent years is the reverse mortgage. A reverse mortgage is not complicated, but may not be the best option for every situation. Essentially, a reverse mortgage is a loan borrowed against the equity of a home, but rather than making monthly payments, the bank reversely pays the borrower. As long as the borrower remains in the home they do not have to pay the bank.

If the borrower moves to a care facility or passes away, then the bank claims the property to pay off the amount given in the loan. This is a good option if the homeowner is healthy enough to remain at home, but requires some caregiving services. Also, this is for people who are not interested in leaving their home behind to loved ones. See here for a more detailed explanation of pros and cons.

Even with 80% of elders receiving “free” care through informal caretakers such as family members, the Congressional Budget Office estimates the value of this donated care at approximately $234 billion for 2011, the last year calculated.[1] This number is determined based on calculating forgone wages, time that could be spent employed elsewhere, transportation costs, and performing duties otherwise performed by paid healthcare aids.

For family caregivers it is especially important to reach out to a social worker for benefits you may not be aware of in your home state. If you are a family caretaker, your loved one may be eligible for respite care, a paid-for medical alert, home health services, or community based waivers paid for by Medicaid depending on financial and medical eligibility. Don’t wait until it is too late and start planning today.


[1] See page 2. http://www.cbo.gov/sites/default/files/44363-LTC.pdf

 

Facts About Medicare You Didn’t Know

If you or a loved one are approaching the 65-year-old mark, it’s time to get serious about Medicare. There are a lot of things to look forward to as you get older (and wiser), and Medicare can be one of them if you take the time to understand the program and how you can benefit from it.

Unfortunately, a lot of confusing misconceptions surround Medicare. This leaves people unsure of how to make the best choice for them. Luckily, we have all the best facts you didn’t know about Medicare from a licensed HealthMarkets agent who knows the program inside and out. Keep reading to make sure you have the right coverage when you reach Medicare years.

Image via Pexels

Medicare is Not Free Insurance

The most common misunderstanding about Medicare is that it is free insurance sponsored by the government. Like all health insurance in the United States, you have to pay premiums for Medicare Part B, Medicare Advantage, and supplemental coverage. The good news is that the government secures costs for Medicare Part B based on your income. The standard premium for Part B in 2018 is $134 assuming your income is under $85,000 as a single taxpayer or $170,000 for joint returns.

If you receive social security benefits, this can help cover the costs of Medicare premiums. For those who opt for Medicare Parts C and D or any supplemental coverage, you have more freedom in the price depending on the plan you choose.

Medicare Will Not Cover All Treatment

Once again, like most traditional health insurance, Medicare will not 100% cover all health costs. Inpatient services involve a deductible over $1300, and you’ll need to pay a fee per day for any coverage in a facility for over 60 days. With Medicare Part B, you’ll need to still pay 20% of the Medicare-approved amount for care, and this is in addition to your annual deductible.

The best way to prepare for the costs of treatment is to do your research. If you know there are certain prescription drugs you’ll need or special doctors you’d prefer to visit, consider a Medicare Part C plan which gives you more freedom in coverage.

Image via Pexels

There is a Deadline to Sign Up

The best time to sign up for Medicare is when you turn 65. This is called the Initial Enrollment Period, and it begins 3 months before you turn 65. It continues for another 3 months after your birthday. If you miss this initial period, you’ll face deadlines if you choose to join later. You’ll also be limited to enrolling during the specific open enrollment times during the year, which could lead to limited coverage.

There are a few exceptions to this rule. First, if you already receive social security benefits, you are automatically enrolled in Medicare on your 65th birthday. Also, if you’re still working and covered by your employer, there are different options. When in doubt, speak to an advisor at your local Social Security office for the specifics of your situation.

You Might Need Supplemental Coverage

Medicare is a great program, but there’s a list of things the program does not cover. Things like long-term care, hearing aids, dental care, or even eye exams are often not covered under Medicare. This is why many seniors opt for a Medigap policy to include extra coverage for these gaps in treatment. Talk to your doctor about what you’ll likely need coverage for in the upcoming years, and prepare yourself with the right additional policy, as needed.

Image via Pexels

You Have Access to Preventative Care

While you’ll likely need to pay for treatment and complex health services, you receive a wide array of preventative care for free. It’s always a good idea to take advantage of these services to stay on top of your health as you age.

The most comprehensive option is the annual wellness visit which includes a personalized prevention plan. Every 5 years you’ll have access to a free cardiovascular screening, and annually you can get a flu shot and routine cancer screenings. The sooner you’re able to catch a potential problem, the less expensive and complicated it will be to treat.

It’s vital you take your health seriously as you age. It’s important to understand that while Medicare covers much of your health care, it does not cover everything. You’ll also need to follow the enrollment rules to take advantage of the program’s benefits. Knowing what Medicare is and is not will help you decide on the right coverage when it matters most.

The best way to prepare for the costs of treatment is to do your research. If you know there are certain prescription drugs you’ll need or special doctors you’d prefer to visit, consider a Medicare Part C plan which gives you more freedom in coverage

Health Insurance and Cancer: Your Mileage (and Coverage) May Vary

Financial toxicity is the phrase used to describe the impact of the cost of treatment on patients. The NIH describes financial toxicity as “problems a patient has related to the cost of treatment.” No matter what kind of health coverage plan you have, if you get a cancer diagnosis you’ll quickly discover all the things you’ll have to pay for, from co-pays on chemotherapy infusion drugs to the intricacies of “co-insurance,” where an insurer will pay a percentage, usually 70-80%, of the cost, with the patient responsible for the remaining percentage.

Financial toxicity isn’t limited to cancer – ask any person with diabetes who relies on insulin to stay alive about that – but the cost of cancer treatments is high, and rising higher. Cancer patients are put in the position of having to decide whether they’ll get the treatment their oncology team prescribes, or if they’ll put it off until they have the money for it. Patient assistance programs at pharmaceutical companies can offer some help, but there is no guarantee that a patient assistance program for a specific cancer drug will help everyone who can’t afford the drug.

An NPR piece covered this last year, framing the story around a man with advanced lung cancer whose oncologist prescribed a new drug, Alecensa, for his treatment. Alecensa’s annual list-price cost is $159,000, with Medicare patients like the man in the NPR piece paying $3,200 per calendar year. The patient in the story was prescribed the drug in late 2016, but decided to forego filling the prescription until January 2017, to avoid having to pay $6,400 within 60 days for the treatment.

This is part of a pattern of cost shifting across the health payment landscape. Premiums for private insurance rose 170% from 1999 to 2011, far higher than the average increase in wages in the same time frame. Prescription co-pays also rose dramatically with the introduction of tiered drug coverage plans that passed more cost to the patient. For example, from 2000 to 2012, the proportion of individuals with a drug plan that had three tiers increased from 27% to 63%.

Exacerbating the immediate financial anxiety of negotiating for a treatment that could mean the difference between life and death, there’s the impact of medical bills on a patient’s long-term financial health. A Consumer Financial Protection Bureau report in 2014 revealed that almost 20% of credit reports had medical debt reported on them. In 2016, the Commonweath Fund noted that, “As of late 2016, 28 percent of U.S. adults ages 19 to 64 who were insured all year were underinsured — or an estimated 41 million people. […] Half (52%) of underinsured adults reported problems with medical bills or debt and more than two of five (45%) reported not getting needed care because of cost.”

I’ll put a face on this issue by introducing you to a friend of mine, Linnea Olson, who has been successfully beating Stage IV lung cancer for over a decade. Linnea has insurance coverage under COBRA, which is costly, but helps keep her alive by covering the costs of treatment that aren’t covered by the clinical trials she’s been part of over the years. She recently got a notice that her insurance had been terminated – the story on that is here, on her blog – which put her in the “high anxiety” zone, to say the least. That post is a very clear example of how financial toxicity impacts someone with cancer. Her situation lit fires across the cancer patient activist community, launching a campaign to get her coverage back. Four days later, she received word that her coverage had been reinstated. She shared that news publicly on her blog, too.

My point here is that this should not be way Americans are expected to deal with a cancer diagnosis – by facing the fight of their life while their financial lives are laid waste. The costs of treatment shouldn’t be the first thing someone has to think of when facing a life-threatening illness. The patient community is in sync on that. The oncology clinical community agrees that treatment costs, and financial toxicity, are in need of clearer discussion. The American Society of Clinical Oncology published a report in 2017 that included a recommendation that discussion of treatment cost and coverage “would […] facilitate rational discussions of efforts to use more cost-efficient regimens, use less expensive alternatives, or perhaps forego extremely expensive and toxic options that have little chance to provide meaningful benefit.”

I recommend that we keep advocating for more transparency in insurance coverage, and in the in-clinic discussion of the costs and benefits of cancer treatments. It also couldn’t hurt to advocate that our elected representatives craft legislation that makes that transparency a requirement, not an option.

Financial Empowerment for Cancer Patients

The Kaiser Center reports that one-third of Americans aged 18-64 years are put into debt because of cancer. The debt is caused as a direct or indirect result of high medical costs, an inability to work and loss of income. More than half of those incurred debts of at least $10,000. The risk of debt or bankruptcy is further exacerbated among younger patients and those with lower incomes. The National Cancer Institute estimates that there are 454.8 new cancer cases per 100,000 men and women each year. Now, more than ever, is financial preparedness a key strategy to battle the disease. Financial healthcare empowerment is going to play a significant role in the fight against cancer. If survival rates are going to improve, it is imperative that everyone is prepared from day one to deal with a shocking news that will affect all fronts of your life from physical and mental to psychological and financial implications.

Preparing for the High Cost of Care

Healthcare, in general, is a costly affair especially if you don’t have a good insurance. In this regard, it is important to squirrel money away even if it is only a small amount. If you are not familiar with the 50-30-20 (regular expenses, wants and savings) rule, you might need to think about it and adopt this strategy to maximize savings that you could put away. Even simple lifestyle changes (strict budgeting and ditching credit cards) already bring you a step closer towards financial independence.

Coping with Financial Stress

Unfortunately, while you are steadily creating your personal wealth, the devastating news of cancer can quickly knock you a few notches down. Resiliency to financial stress is key in getting through the illness. This means smarter management of assets and finding ways to get help for your treatments.Seeking the services of a financial counselor or social worker upon diagnosis is imperative to check out what resources are available to you.

Better Cancer Treatment Options but Rising Healthcare Costs

The good news is that treatment options for cancer are getting better as the years passed. The bad news is that these therapies are pricey and are likely to eat up the budgets of cancer patients. Although it might be difficult to come to terms with your diagnosis, it is important that you start researching treatment options immediately. Your healthcare insurance might not be enough to pay for treatment.

Dealing with Healthcare Finances, Loss of Income and Even Bankruptcy

There are several state and federal programs that offer financial support to individuals and families. Known as entitlements, they are directed at low-income groups, the elderly and disabled persons.Pharmaceutical patient assistance programs also exist to help with reimbursements, referrals for co-pay relief programs and discounted/free medications. You can also participate in paid clinical trials to help defray costs of treatments. Cancer organizations and general organizations can support treatment plans for patients.

Cancer is a devastating disease that has serious financial repercussions. It can cause physical and emotional stress as treatments and therapies can literally cost a fortune that in turn may in debt you or at worse, lead to bankruptcy. Being prepared financially for any disaster can mitigate these negative effects and taking charge of money matters is empowering.