Tag Archive for: clinical trials

Updates from ASH: How Biomarker Testing Has Changed MPN Care

Updates from ASH: How Biomarker Testing Has Changed MPN Care from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

MPN specialist, Dr. Andrew Kuykendall, discusses how the identification of specific biomarkers in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), such as the JAK2 mutation, have moved research forward. Dr. Kuykendall shares promising findings that were released at the 2021 American Society of Hematology (ASH) annual meeting and how this may impact MPN care in the future.

Dr. Andrew Kuykendall is an Assistant Member at Moffitt Cancer Center in the Department of Malignant Hematology. Dr. Kuykendall’s clinical and research efforts focus on myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), MDS/MPN overlap syndromes and systemic mastocytosis (SM). Learn more about Dr. Kuykendall, here.

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Transcript

Katherine:

How has molecular or biomarker testing changed the field of MPN care and treatment?

Dr. Kuykendall:

Well, I think, first and foremost just understanding – going back to 2005 and knowing that we have JAK2 mutations. I think that gave really a lot of clarity to the diagnosis and really understanding the biology of how the disease acted through the JAK-STAT pathway. And certainly, that led to the understanding of MPL mutations and then calreticulin mutations.

We’re still figuring out exactly how calreticulin mutations work. There was a great abstract, a preclinical abstract, this year talking about the impact of interferon on calreticulin mutations and how that may differ from what we see in the impact of interferon on diseases that are driven by JAK2 mutations.

Clinically, we see a little bit of difference in how those diseases respond and we may understand a little bit better about why that happens. Additionally, that’s kind of gone down to looking at these big next generation sequencing panels where we identify high-risk mutations and that can certainly change our understanding of the prognosis of these diseases.

We’re starting to get, at least in the AML world, we’re getting targeted agents that can potentially target some of these mutations such as IDH1 and IDH2 mutations that have specific inhibitors.

Those are mutations that occur in myeloproliferative neoplasm patients and convey a worse prognosis, so there are ongoing trials looking to see if we can use those IDH inhibitors in myeloproliferative neoplasms either in the chronic phase or maybe in the more accelerated advanced phase.

You know the big thing, this meeting, was actually looking at polycythemia vera patients and what’s the relevance of the JAK2 mutant allele burden. I think this is something we’ve talked about a lot as far as how significant this is. We know in chronic phase myeloproliferative neoplasms that that JAK2 mutation tends to be associated with more thrombotic complications.

There are more blood clots in the veins and the arteries. There were a couple great abstracts that looked at the really the implications of the JAK2 mutation and the fact that it is associated with more thrombosis, but maybe more venous thrombosis. That might be a big risk factor for venous thrombosis and it may be that cardiovascular risk factors, such as diabetes, hyperlipidemia that’s really what’s driving the arteriole thrombosis. It also looked at the variant allele fraction, the number of cells that have that JAK2 mutation.

One abstract showed that if you have over a 50 percent allele fraction, if more than 50 percent of the alleles have the mutation – a higher burden of that mutation that’s associated with an increased thrombotic risk even in low-risk polycythemia vera patients. Whether or not that’s enough evidence to really change the paradigm of how we treat low-risk patients is to be determined, but I think very interesting and provocative work. 

Expert Advice for Finding an MPN Clinical Trial

Expert Advice for Finding an MPN Clinical Trial from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Dr. Andrew Kuykendall, an MPN specialist and researcher, shares tips for learning about available clinical trials. Dr. Kuykendall emphasizes the importance of seeking a consultation with a specialist and suggests questions to ask your provider about clinical trials.

Dr. Andrew Kuykendall is an Assistant Member at Moffitt Cancer Center in the Department of Malignant Hematology. Dr. Kuykendall’s clinical and research efforts focus on myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), MDS/MPN overlap syndromes and systemic mastocytosis (SM). Learn more about Dr. Kuykendall, here.

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MPN Research and Optimism About Curative Therapies

 


Transcript

Katherine:

How can patients find out about clinical trials? Are there specific questions that they should be asking their doctors about to participate in a trial?

Dr. Kuykendall:

Yeah. I think it’s tough. One way – there are a few different tools that I would recommend. One, if you’re very interested in just what trials are going on you can go to this national cancer trials, or NCT, network and try to understand online what trials are available. Clinicaltrials.gov is the actual website but that’ll show you the ongoing clinical trials that are there.

You can type in a disease state, so you can type in polycythemia vera or myelofibrosis or essential thrombocythemia, and it’ll give you a huge list of all the trials that are there. It can be kind of overwhelming because it’ll list all of the trials that have ever been done, but there are different ways that you can stratify those results and look for trials that are just recruiting that are active and that’ll taper down that list. And when you click on those trials there usually is at the bottom a list of participating centers that are there. So, you can see the different centers that are there. Overall, I think that that is a very broad way of doing it and somewhat complicated.

What I would ask is – and one of the things that we always push for is – while most of these myeloproliferative neoplasms can be treated quite easily in the community, meaning that the actual mechanisms of what’s being provided is not something that requires a specialized center. I think the understanding of the disease really does. We always recommend having someone in your corner who’s an expert. They don’t have to be the one who is most involved in your care but having someone in your corner who’s an expert.

That’s the person who’s going to know what trials are going on, what trials may be coming down the pipeline, where those trials may be occurring, and they might also tell you “Okay, here are the things that would prompt you to maybe want a trial.” I had a lot of patients that were surprised to realize there were trials available just because they had – they were getting six or seven phlebotomies a year. They were complaining about that but they figured that was just the ways things were. Lo and behold, there was actually a trial that was ongoing that was trying to reduce the need for those phlebotomies in otherwise low-risk patients.

You can always go to clinicaltrials.gov but also try to ask your doctor about hey is there, if you haven’t seen an expert, is there someone close by an expert that I can see for a second opinion just to understand the disease and ask about trials. Usually everyone’s okay with that and when you do see an expert, say “Hey, first of all what trials are right for me now and what in the future might be reasonable and how am I going to know and how often should I check in to see what things are available?” 

The Latest in MPN Research: Updates from ASH 2021

The Latest in MPN Research: Updates from ASH 2021 from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

MPN specialist, Dr. Andrew Kuykendall, shares the latest news from the 2021 American Society of Hematology (ASH) annual meeting. Dr. Kuykendall discusses the latest findings in MPN research, including an update on JAK inhibitors, advances in BET inhibitors, as well as a new therapy in development aimed at reducing phlebotomy in patients with polycythemia vera (PV).

Dr. Andrew Kuykendall is an Assistant Member at Moffitt Cancer Center in the Department of Malignant Hematology. Dr. Kuykendall’s clinical and research efforts focus on myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), MDS/MPN overlap syndromes and systemic mastocytosis (SM). Learn more about Dr. Kuykendall, here.

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Transcript

Katherine:

You’re joining us following the American Society of Hematology Meeting where cancer researchers came together to share their findings. Are there highlights from the meeting that patients should know about?

Dr. Kuykendall:

Yeah, absolutely. So, the meeting we just came from, the so-called ASH meeting, is really an annual meeting. Happens every December.

It’s really a chance for researchers to share their most exciting findings and really what they’ve been working on for the past few years, and certainly in the past year.

As a clinical researcher, I think I have always a keen interest in clinical trials that are going to give us some new data so we can see how things are working, but I think this is also a big meeting for pre-clinical studies for basic scientists who get to share what’s exciting in their labs. A lot of times that’ll give a preview of what’s to come maybe four, five years down the road what we’ll see on the clinical side. From the clinical side, which is more in my realm, there is certainly a few specific things to get excited about. Within the field of myeloproliferative neoplasms, we have polycythemia vera, ET – essential thrombocythemia, myelofibrosis.

And on the myelofibrosis side of things, I think we continue to get excited about just really the proliferation of drugs that are in late-stage clinical trials. This meeting was no different from that.

We started to get a little bit more clarity as far as this agent, pelabresib, which is a BET inhibitor which is being looked at really in a variety of different settings as a single agent in combination with ruxolitinib (Jakafi) and as an add-on to ruxolitinib as well.

This was another exciting need to get an update on where the data looks to be with pelabresib. Certainly, there’s an ongoing Phase III study in the up-front setting with that agent. We’re anxiously awaiting results too. Additionally, we’ve got more information regarding other JAK inhibitors that may be coming down the pipeline in the coming months to years with momelotinib and pacritinib.

Certainly, that’s always exciting to see the data come from there, especially when we get kind of further along in their trials, we start to get very isolated assessments of their data. Looking specifically at transfusion rates and the efficacy within the subpopulations that have unmet need. And so, I think that that’s always exciting.

I think polycythemia vera – this is a really big meeting for polycythemia vera. We obviously know that ropeginterferon (Besremi) just got FDA-approved in November.

We also started to see the updated data with rusfertide, or PTG-300, which is a hepcidin memetic that aims to reduce phlebotomy rates in patients that are requiring a ton of phlebotomies which, as we know, can be very impactful on quality of life having to get recurrent phlebotomies.

I think that those were the really big highlights, and the take-aways from this is really we are starting to see these agents move into the late-stage clinical trials.

Which Tests Do You Need Before Deciding on an AML Treatment Path?

Which Tests Do You Need Before Deciding on an AML Treatment Path? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

 Why is it important to ask about biomarker testing for your AML? Find out how test results could reveal more about your AML and may help determine the most effective treatment approach for your individual disease.

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Transcript:

Why do you need biomarker testing before deciding on a treatment plan for your acute myeloid leukemia—also known as AML?

The results may predict how your AML will behave and could indicate that one type of treatment may be more effective than another.

Biomarker testing—also referred to as risk stratification, genetic testing, or molecular testing—identifies specific gene mutations, proteins, chromosomal abnormalities and/or other molecular changes that are unique to your AML.

The results of these tests are used to determine if you have low-risk or high-risk AML to help guide prognosis and to evaluate the goals of treatment.

There are certain biomarkers—such as the FLT3, IDH1 and IDH2 mutations—that could indicate that your AML may respond well to a targeted therapy. There are several FDA-approved targeted therapies—known as inhibitor therapies—which treat patients with these mutations.

Additionally, the identification of other biomarkers—such as TP53, NPM1, or CEBPA mutations, to name a few—may aid in assessing your prognosis, determining a treatment course, or may identify if an allogeneic stem cell transplant may be appropriate. Results of these tests may also suggest that a clinical trial is your best treatment option.

So, how can you Insist on the best care for YOUR AML?

• First, always bring a friend or a loved one to your appointments to help you process information and to take notes.

• Ask your doctor if you have had, or will receive, biomarker testing and how the results may impact your care and treatment plan. Be sure to ask for paper or electronic copies of your important test results.

• Finally, always speak up and ask questions. It’s important that you understand all of the information that you want to know about your AML to help make the best treatment decisions for you. You are your own best advocate, and treating AML is a team approach.

To learn more about your AML and to access tools for self-advocacy, visit powerfulpatients.org/AML

What Do You Need to Know About Metastatic Breast Cancer Genetic Testing?

What Do You Need to Know About Metastatic Breast Cancer Genetic Testing? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Why is it important to ask about metastatic breast cancer genetic testing? Find out how test results could reveal more about YOUR breast cancer and could help determine the most effective treatment approach.

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Transcript:

Why should you ask your doctor about metastatic breast cancer genetic testing?

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network – also known as the NCCN – recommends that every metastatic breast cancer patient undergo genetic testing. The test results can help predict how your cancer may behave and could indicate that one type of treatment is more effective than another.

This testing identifies specific gene mutations, proteins, chromosomal abnormalities, and/or other molecular changes that are unique to YOU and YOUR breast cancer.

There are two main types of genetic tests used in breast cancer:

  • Germline or hereditary genetic testing, which identifies inherited gene mutations in the body. These mutations are present from birth, can be shared among family members and be passed on to subsequent generations.
  • The second is somatic or tumor genetic testing, which identifies markers that are unique to the cancer itself. It is also commonly referred to as genomic testing, biomarker testing, or molecular profiling. Somatic mutations are NOT inherited or passed down from family member to family member.
  • Depending on your history, your doctor may order one–or both–of these types of tests.

So why do the test results matter?

  • If you have specific gene mutations – such as the BRCA1 or BRCA2 inherited gene mutations – it could indicate that a targeted treatment approach may be the most effective option. For example, there are two oral targeted therapies that are approved specifically for use in metastatic patients with BRCA1-positive or BRCA2-positive breast cancer.
  • Results of these tests may also help you to find a clinical trial that may be appropriate for your particular cancer.
  • Additionally, results from germline genetic testing may suggest that close family members should also be tested to determine their risk.

How can you insist on the best breast cancer care?

  • First, always speak up and ask questions. Remember, you have a voice in YOUR breast cancer care.
  • Ask your doctor if you have had–or will receive–genetic testing, including germline and somatic testing.
  • If you have already undergone genetic testing, bring a copy of your results to your current doctor, so they can understand your results and determine whether additional testing is needed.
  • Have a discussion with your healthcare team about the test results – including which markers were detected and how results may impact your care and treatment plan.
  • Ask whether your family members should meet with a genetic counselor or undergo testing to help gauge their risk of developing breast cancer.
  • And, finally, bring a friend or a loved one to your appointments to help you process and recall information.

To learn more about breast cancer and to access tools for self-advocacy, visit powerfulpatients.org/breastcancer

Involving Patients in their Care: The Clinical Trial and Drug Development Processes

Patient involvement in every facet of healthcare is incredibly important in creating better patient outcomes. I believe this is especially true in the rare and chronic disease communities, including cancer. One facet that is particularly key for patient engagement is the development of drugs produced through the clinical trial process.

Clinical trials can cost millions to fund with the goal of producing a product(s) that may or may not help it’s targeted disease population. Thousands of patients rely on these trials to find a cure and/or enhance their quality of life by providing symptoms of relief. Yet many don’t know about them, and if they do, it’s a struggle to find them, much less enroll in one.

As a person who takes on many roles, including a rare disease patient and a cancer patient, as well as someone who has translated clinical trial protocols for a lay audience and now recruits for those trials, I have seen firsthand the barriers that patients face when it comes to potentially life-saving treatments. Below is what I have encountered and what we as healthcare professionals can do about it:

Visibility Into Clinical Trials

While most patients know of and about clinical trials, they are often not aware that they may be an option for treatment. Healthcare is a business, and because of this, doctors feel like they’re “losing” their patients (aka revenue) when they refer their patients. However, most healthcare organizations, facilities, etc. boast that they’re focused on patient-centered care. Patient-centered care means focusing on the needs of each patient and providing the best treatment possible even if it comes from another source.

The Language of Clinical Trials

Clinical trials are often discussed using medical jargon that is too confusing for patients to understand, especially the eligibility criteria. Patients should not be expected to learn a new language to understand the treatment process. Rather, they need resources that will help them understand if they qualify, what will happen in the trial, and how long they’ll be in the trial for.

Outcomes of Clinical Trials

A patient who had participated in a clinical trial once told me that the investigators focused mainly on whether the drug that she was receiving was treating her condition and never considered her quality of life. Quality of life should automatically be included as a measurable outcome in each clinical trial even if it’s not the main purpose.

Involvement in Clinical Trials and Drug Development

Patient centricity, as written above, has become a buzzword in the healthcare industry. The drug company, AstraZeneca, defines it best: “Putting the patient first in an open and sustained engagement of the patient to respectfully and compassionately achieve the best outcome for that patient and their family.” Are we really doing this if patients aren’t involved in the drug and clinical trial development processes?

How can patients invest themselves, and the government and pharma invest in patients, to potentially get a better ROI?:

  • Look at Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute’s website, whose work focuses on outcomes most important to patients and research that focuses on gold-standard randomized controlled trials, as well as observational studies.
  • Sign up for AstraZeneca’s Patient Partnership Program
  • Research articles on drug development for your disease and contact the authors
  • Engage in the FDA’s Patient Representative Program
  • Join the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDHR)’s Patient Engagement Advisory Committee
  • Join the FDA’s Patient Engagement Collaborative
  • Participate and/or request a Patient Listening Session
  • Present at an Open Public Hearing Portion of an FDA Advisory Committee Meeting
  • Get involved in:
    • The FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER)’s Patient-Focused Drug Development program by subscribing to their email updates
    • A patient advocacy group and/or think tank
    • An organization related to your diagnosis that may have doctors on their Board that you can reach out to and share your story and the importance of involving patients

Find more information in this PDF created by Global Genes

Lung Cancer Advocate Shares How to Optimize Your Telemedicine Visit

Lung Cancer Advocate Shares How to Optimize Your Telemedicine Visit from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

How can lung cancer patients optimize their telemedicine visits? Watch as lung cancer patient Jill shares her top tips for how to prepare for virtual visits and how to advocate for yourself when communicating for optimal care.

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Transcript:

Jill:

One thing that someone else recently mentioned to me is to be patient with the doctor who might be late, and I don’t mind actually, the doctor’s late or early. I’ve had a doctor be up to half an hour early or up to an hour late, and that doesn’t bother me, I just go on living life and doing other things while I wait for the call, but I do book a bigger chunk of time on my calendar with the expectation that doctors are really busy people and they can’t always predict how long something else will go or what would come up, so it’s good to be understanding about it for sure. 

It’s also helpful for me and a lot of people to write a list of questions, symptoms, and make sure that you get them all answered, so write them down and actually check them off, or cross them off while you’re in the appointment, because you don’t wanna walk away from there thinking, oh shoot, there was that one big question I had and some doctors are okay with getting an email or something between appointments, and some nurses are great to call, but not everyone has that opportunity. 

So, I would say, make the most of your appointment just like you would in-person. Take good care to make sure that you’re advocating for yourself, and if the doctor says words after you ask your cost your question, you don’t feel like you understood them. Don’t be embarrassed or afraid or anything… just ask again, ask for clarification. Sometimes these doctors talk in big words, and my doctor has been great, my oncologist he would like draw pictures and I ask him often to write words down for me if I don’t know how to spell them because why would I know how to spell that? I don’t have a medical and oncology degree, so there’s no shame in asking questions, asking questions is smart, and it helps make us better informed, and it’s true that a better informed and a better-informed patient is a more empowered patient, and we tend to have better outcomes, when we know what’s going on in our treatment, so take the time to ask your questions.

_____________________________________________________________________________

Lung Cancer Patient Shares Top Tips for Utilizing Telemedicine

Lung Cancer Patient Shares Top Tips for Utilizing Telemedicine from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Stage IV lung cancer survivor and nurse Gina has taken advantage of telemedicine opportunities in her care. Watch as she shares her perspective about the benefits of telemedicine and her hopes for the future. In Gina’s words, “..no matter where they are in the world, I don’t think that where you live should determine if you live, I think everyone should have access to the very best care…”

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Transcript:

Gina:

When it comes to telemedicine, I think that we have to think of it as an adjunct to care, so it wouldn’t replace your actual care with your doctor, and so I think that utilizing telemedicine would really just be kind of like getting a second opinion, getting somebody else to look at your case, and it would have been an opportunity really for you and your community doctor to work with an expert in the field, wherever, whatever disease state you’re being treated it with, and I think that’s one of the silver linings of COVID that we can use, so it wouldn’t necessarily be that telemedicine is taking over your care, but it’s really just an adjunct to your care. So, you would still be touched by your doctor, you still would be assessed by your community doctor, but that community doctor would be leaning on the expertise of the doctor in which you’re getting a second opinion or you’re consulting with…so I think that’s the way that we have to think of telemedicine and diversifying and really making sure that everybody has access to the best care, it’s not really in placement of your normal care, but just an adjunct, so in addition to your care. 

One thing that I really hope that we can benefit from is…I hope that we can really learn from COVID. We learned that really there is a disease that is not defined by borders, and so I hope that we can use the opportunities and the things the way that we were, so I guess we persevered in spite of a disease, I hope we can use that for clinical trials to and so what I mean by that is I feel like the silver lining of COVID was telemedicine, and we were able to provide telemedicine to patients no matter where they were, no matter how they felt, they were able to have the best of the best care right in the comfort of their own home. And so one of the things that I actually personally benefited from was because of COVID, telemedicine was open up everywhere, and so I was able to actually get care from some of the best ALK cancer experts in Boston through telemedicine, and so I wasn’t actually required to travel to Boston instead, I could meet with that doctor by Zoom, and sadly, once the COVID mandates were lifted, that hospital was no longer providing telemedicine, so I was getting this great care, this expert advice in my disease process, and all of a sudden it was stopped, and so I hope that one of the things that we can do is figure out ways to utilize telemedicine to really bring the best care to patients no matter where they are in the United States or really…no matter where they are in the world, I don’t think that where you live should determine if you live, I think everyone should have access to the very best care, and I think it can be delivered through telemedicine.

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Why Should You Ask Your Doctor About Prostate Cancer Genetic Testing?

Why Should You Ask Your Doctor About Prostate Cancer Genetic Testing? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Why is it genetic testing important when it comes to prostate cancer care? Learn how test results could reveal more about YOUR prostate cancer and may indicate that one treatment may be more effective than another.

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Transcript:

Why should you ask your doctor about genetic testing?

The test results may predict how your prostate cancer will behave and could indicate that one type of treatment may be more effective than another type.

Genetic testing identifies specific gene mutations, proteins, chromosomal abnormalities, and/or other molecular changes that are unique to YOU and YOUR prostate cancer.

There are two main types of genetic tests used in prostate cancer:

  • Germline or hereditary genetic testing, which is conducted via blood or saliva and identifies inherited gene mutations in the body. Germline mutations are present from birth and can be shared among family members and passed on to subsequent generations. Results can identify whether you could be at risk for another type of cancer or if your family members may need genetic counseling and testing to guide their own cancer risk.
  • The second is somatic or tumor genetic testing, which is performed through testing tumor tissue or by testing cancer cells/DNA extracted from blood to identify gene mutations that are unique to the cancer itself. It is also commonly referred to as genomic testing, biomarker testing, or molecular profiling. Somatic mutations are NOT inherited and are NOT passed on to subsequent generations or shared among family members.
  • Depending on your history, your doctor may order one–or both–of these types of tests.

So why do the test results matter?

Both germline and somatic mutation testing can identify the presence of certain genetic mutations that may help to guide your treatment plan, and germline testing specifically can inform cancer risk for you and, potentially, family members.

  • In some cases, mutations can indicate that a newer approach, such as targeted therapy or immunotherapy, may work better for you.
  • Results of these tests may also help you to find a clinical trial that may be appropriate for your particular cancer.
  • And, genetic testing results could also show that your cancer has a mutation or marker that may prevent a certain therapy from being effective, sparing you from getting a treatment that won’t work well for you.

How can make sure you have had essential biomarker testing?

  • First, always speak up and ask questions. Remember, you have a voice in YOUR prostate cancer care.
  • Ask your doctor if you have had or will receive genetic testing, including germline and somatic testing, and how the results may impact your care and treatment plan.
  • Ask whether your family members should meet with a genetic counselor or undergo testing to help gauge their risk of developing prostate cancer.
  • And, finally, bring a friend or a loved one to your appointments to help you process and recall information.

To learn more about your prostate cancer and to access tools for self-advocacy, visit powerfulpatients.org/prostatecancer

Lung Cancer: Donna’s Clinical Trial Profile

Lung Cancer: Donna’s Clinical Trial Profile from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Lung cancer patient Donna had a sub-optimal experience with her first treatment regimen. Watch as she shares her lung cancer journey, knowledge and benefits gained from a clinical trial, and her advice to patients seeking additional treatment options.

Patient-to-Patient Diverse Lung Cancer Clinical Trial Profiles

Transcript:

Donna: 

I’m Donna, I am 68 years old, and I was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2012. 

When I was first diagnosed with lung cancer, I was put on a regimen of paraplatin (Carboplatin) and bevacizumab (Avastin) drugs. I received that for four or five months and did not do particularly well on it.  My body did not react well to those chemicals, my tumors, however, did respond as long as I was getting the drug. 

After we discovered that my tumors were not going to respond to chemo unless I was getting it all the time, my doctor suggested that I either go on another drug, chemo drug that was even harsher than what I had been on and did not have as good of results or suggested that I might do a clinical trial. I had been told that I probably only had about four months to live. And I decided that, number one, I was in no hurry to be sicker than I already was and number two, that if there was a way I could help future patients by participating in a trial that the trial was the way I wanted to go. I never ever assumed that I would benefit from being in a clinical trial, I was very uninformed about clinical trials. 

A clinical trial is a way that the pharmaceutical company or researchers test certain drugs. They will see if the drug works at all, it moves to humans and out of the laboratory, and everything doesn’t necessarily work the same way or on humans as it did in the lab. So…in the Phase III trial like I was in, by that point in time, they’re learning how in the fairly general population, how the drug is going to react, if it’s actually going to work, how much of a dose is the right dose, and how frequent it should be. The clinical trial is just to provide the information that’s needed to determine whether a drug should go forward into the general population or not.  

One tumor started growing again, and I chose to have radiation, which made me have to get out of the clinical trial. But after radiation, I went back onto the same drug that we had been testing through the clinical trial, because I had responded so well through it, and I stayed on that drug until from 2013 until 2019. And during in April of 2019, I quit having any kind of treatments, and so now I’m just monitored every four months to make sure that my tumors have remained stable and so far, so good. 

I would go into a clinical trial without hesitation if my tumors begin to grow again, my first consideration will be to get into another clinical trial, you are getting the cutting-edge drug. And not only that, while I was in the clinical trial, I had a researcher and I had my oncologist, I had a lot of people really following my health. I had multiple, far more scans done, which some people might look at as a negative, but they were really following me closely to make sure that my response was what it needed to be. You can get out of the clinical trial, you are not stuck in a clinical trial. So, if you get into it and you are either sick or if your tumors are not responding the way you hope they would, you’re not stuck in a clinical trial, and that’s an important thing to know. To me, there will never be another option that I will consider first, I will always consider the clinical trial first. And because I felt that the quality of care I got was higher, and it also saves you a lot of money because at least the drug itself is going to be provided at no cost. 

So that’s a huge consideration too. 

I would not be afraid to look into clinical trials, I would never accept a doctor telling me that there were no options for me. I have friends who had doctors tell them that they just didn’t think there was anything more that could be done, they needed to go into hospice. My advice is to look for a different doctor, because that’s not always true. And clinical trials are not necessarily easy to find, but I would certainly do my due diligence and look into whether there is one that’s good for you. And I would also strongly recommend that you immediately go through genetic testing so that you know what kind of mutations you might have, because that will drive the kind of clinical trial you might be wanting to get into, and also just the treatment in general. 

How Is AML Treatment Effectiveness Monitored?

How Is AML Treatment Effectiveness Monitored? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

How can acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treatment effectiveness be monitored over time? Expert Dr. Ellen Ritchie explains when testing is typically done following AML treatment, which methods are used for monitoring, and when retesting may be appropriate.

Dr. Ellen K. Ritchie is assistant professor of medicine and a member of the Leukemia Program at the Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University and the New York Presbyterian Hospital. More about Dr. Ritchie, here.

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Key AML Testing for Better Care: Understanding Prognosis and Treatment Choices

Transcript:

Katherine:

Once a patient has begun treatment, how do you monitor whether it’s working?

Dr. Ritchie:

So, one of the more frustrating things about being an AML patient, is you don’t know right off the bat whether or not that you have gone into remission. So, what happens is you receive the chemotherapy, and the day you start chemotherapy is really day one. And somewhere around day 14, you’re at your lowest point. So, your blood counts are low, and you often feel really terrible, and you really wonder, is this working? But unfortunately, I can’t really tell you. Some institutions do bone marrow biopsies if you have intensive chemotherapy on day 14, or if you’re getting venetoclax (Venclexta) therapy somewhere around day 21 to look and see whether they still see leukemia cells, but the utility of that is different per institution.

The real test of whether chemotherapy x, is at the end of about 28-35 days, are your blood counts coming up, and are you making normal blood cells. Are you making platelets, which are the part of the blood that clots the blood? Or are you making neutrophils, which are the important cells needed to help you fight infection. So, the real proof of a remission, is are your platelets over 100,000? Is your neutrophil count over 1,000? And when we look in the bone marrow around that time, do we see normal cells developing and no leukemia?

Katherine:

How often should testing take place? And should patients be retested over time?

Dr. Ritchie:

So, the bone marrow biopsy is done frequently once you have a diagnosis of acute leukemia. So certainly, it’s done upon diagnosis of the disease.

And as I mentioned earlier in certain institutions, about halfway through your chemotherapy cycle, they’ll do a bone marrow biopsy to see whether or not they see any residual leukemia cells. That’s not done everywhere, and it’s done differently depending upon institutions sometimes. At the end of the chemotherapy treatment, if you recover your blood counts, we do a bone marrow biopsy to confirm a remission. If by day 35, we haven’t seen that your blood counts are recovering, we may do a bone marrow biopsy to see whether or not we see leukemia cells in there, or early recovery. So, you’re definitely going to have bone marrows at those time points. If you’ve gone into remission, it depends on what we’d do next as to when you would have another bone marrow biopsy. So, if you’re going to bone marrow transplant you may have one more biopsy, just prior to going into transplant, and another biopsy at the end of the first month after transplant.

If you’re going to have what we call ongoing therapy, roughly every three or four months, we may do a bone marrow biopsy to determine whether or not the remission is holding. If during ongoing therapy, we see that there is blood count abnormalities that we weren’t expecting, that might be a reason that we would do a bone marrow biopsy. And that’s unpredictable as to when that would be.

Is the COVID-19 Vaccine Safe and Effective for AML Patients?

Is the COVID-19 Vaccine Safe and Effective for AML Patients? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

What should acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients know about COVID-19 vaccines? Expert Dr. Ellen Ritchie shares information about COVID-19 vaccine safety and effectiveness for AML patients and reviews side effects that may follow vaccination.

Dr. Ellen K. Ritchie is assistant professor of medicine and a member of the Leukemia Program at the Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University and the New York Presbyterian Hospital. More about Dr. Ritchie, here.

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Transcript:

Katherine:

The second question is from Craig, he says, “I’m currently undergoing treatment for AML. Is the COVID-19 vaccine safe and effective?”

Dr. Ritchie:

I recommend the COVID-19 vaccine to everyone, all my patients. A little immunity is better than none. And there is preliminary data, looking at patients with myeloid malignancies, not lymphoid, but myeloid malignancies, where it appears there is an immune response to the COVID-19 vaccine. So, I would suggest that you get the COVID-19 vaccine. Any of them that are available, are good. Whether it’s Moderna, or Pfizer, or Johnson & Johnson. Whatever is available to you, you should go ahead and get.

Katherine:

Are there any symptoms or issues that AML patients should be looking for post-vaccine?

Dr. Ritchie:

Post-vaccine, there’s a lot of symptoms that people have. And they can be similar among myeloid patients. Some of my patients have had no reaction whatsoever, some people have had a really sore arm.

Some patients are incredibly tired after the vaccine; some patients develop a low-grade fever for a couple of days. Those are really what we watch for. Sometimes when there’s a reaction, we’re hopeful that there’s an antibody being made, or an immune response that’s developing. So, it’s not always a bad thing if you have a reaction. But I don’t think that the reactions of patients of myeloid malignancies is any different than that of the general public.

How to Be a Partner in Your AML Care

How to Be a Partner in Your AML Care from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

How can acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients take a proactive approach to their care? Expert Dr. Ellen Ritchie shares advice for qualities to look for in your AML care provider and how to ensure all your questions are answered by your healthcare team.

Dr. Ellen K. Ritchie is assistant professor of medicine and a member of the Leukemia Program at the Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University and the New York Presbyterian Hospital. More about Dr. Ritchie, here.

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Being Pro-Active in Your Care: Key AML Testing to Advocate For

Advocating for Key AML Testing: Advice From an Expert

Advocating for Key AML Testing: Advice From an Expert

Transcript:

Katherine:

Dr. Ritchie, what advice do you have for patients to help them feel more confident in speaking up and advocating, being a partner in their care?

Dr. Ritchie:

Well, when you choose a leukemia doctor, you need to choose someone that you can actually communicate with. Someone who you feel is not allowing you to ask questions, or is not curious about what your life is like, you may want to think, I want to check out somebody else.

Because it’s really important you like the person who’s your doctor, and that you have a trust relationship together. So, it’s really – I tell some patients it’s a marriage of convenience that we have. And that you really have to think of it that way. If someone doesn’t allow you to ask questions or if they are not fully answering your questions in a way that you understand, try and speak up for yourself and make sure that the doctor tries to address that. And if the doctor won’t address those things for you, or you feel like you don’t understand what is being explained to you, then you can think about trying to see someone else. I think it’s really important if you can, to write down as many questions as you have about your disease before you come in.

Because often what happens is you get there, you’re stunned by the amount of information, and the questions you wanted to ask, you forget. And the next day, you’re like, “Ugh, I didn’t ask these questions.” So, before you come in, if you write questions. Questions about insurance coverage, that may not be something that we go over. Or questions about toxicities, or questions, “If I’m going to lose my hair, do you have the name of a wig facility?” All these questions that you might have, put them on a piece of paper, so that they can be addressed when you’re with the doctor. And other things will come up, you’ll have other questions when you’re there, but make sure your fundamental questions are answered.