Tag Archive for: targeted therapies

Are There Any Long-Term Side Effect Risks for CLL Patients?

Are There Any Long-Term Side Effect Risks for CLL Patients? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients are at-risk for some treatment side effects. Watch as Dr. Nadia Khan from Fox Chase Cancer Center shares how side effects can vary by treatment type and some side effects for CLL patients to be aware of.

See More from START HERE CLL

Related Programs:

How Often Do CLL Patients Develop a Second Gene Mutation?

How Often Do CLL Patients Develop a Second Gene Mutation?

What Is CAR T-Cell Therapy in CLL?

What Is CAR T-Cell Therapy in CLL?


Transcript:

Mary Leer: 

George asks, are there any long-term side effect risks for CLL patients? 

Dr. Nadia Khan: 

That’s a great question, George. It really would depend on the therapy being instituted and when in the chemoimmunotherapy era for CLL patients, we have a very different perspective of what short-term and long-term side effects were and are for those patients who have been treated with chemoimmunotherapy. For patients treated with targeted therapies and immunotherapy combinations today, there tends to be fewer serious long-term side effects when looking at the various drug classes. For example, BTK inhibitors, there is a risk of atrial fibrillation that remains constant throughout the course of therapy, and if a patient is on therapy for one year or 10 years, they can develop that particular side effect. High blood pressure can be significant with BTK inhibitors as well, and that risk also tends to be stable. In terms of infection risk, there is relative immunosuppression with all CLL therapeutics, and so our concern, more recently has been focused on COVID infection, serious bacterial and viral infections tend to be less frequent, we don’t institute prophylaxis for those infections because they tend to be so few and far between in the patients that we’ve treated.  

How to Approach Side Effects With CLL Medications

How to Approach Side Effects With CLL Medications from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients often experience treatment side effects. Watch as Dr. Nadia Khan from Fox Chase Cancer Center explains CLL medications that typically cause side effects and how the side effects can be managed.

See More from START HERE CLL

Related Programs:

What is the Prognosis of CLL?

What is Watch and Wait in CLL?

What is Watch and Wait in CLL?

CLL Patient-Expert Q&A

CLL Patient-Expert Q&A


Transcript:

Mary Leer: 

We have a question from Larry about side effects. Larry says: I’ve been fighting side effects with each medicine. Will the correct answer for side effects in CLL always be to stop the medicine? 

Dr. Nadia Khan: 

Larry, thank you for your question. It is an excellent one, and this is something that we encounter on a very regular basis in CLL patients who are on targeted therapies. The side effects occur frequently in patients taking BTK inhibitors, in patients taking PIK inhibitors, and we have some side effects reported on BCLT inhibitors as well. Typically, side effects on all of these targeted therapies can be managed with either dose reduction or supportive therapies, and we don’t necessarily have to stop a medication due to a side effect that is encountered. And, of course, it would depend on the type of side effect and the severity of the side effect before deciding to pause therapy for a time or to dose reduce or add other medications to help. 

Mary Leer: 

Sarah has a question about side effects. How can I tell if side effects are from CLL, my medicine, or just a part of aging? 

Dr. Nadia Khan: 

Thanks for that question, Sarah. It can be a challenge to tease out the cause of any given complaint, whether the symptom is due to underlying other medical conditions, the medications a patient is on, their CLL therapy, their CLLl itself is something that we find to be challenging, and it can often be a process of elimination and understanding when side effects started and how they are related to the known side effect profile of a therapy is often a starting point. Depending on the side effect, we may decide to institute a treatment holiday, and if the side effect improves or resolves during the treatment holiday, it’s more clear that the side effect is due to the medication in question. If the side effect persists during that period of time, then it’s more likely to be due to something else. 

What Is the Role of Next-Generation Sequencing in MPNs

What Is the Role of Next-Generation Sequencing in MPNs? from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

 Myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) patients can take advantage of a medical advancement called next-generation sequencing. Watch to learn about next-generation sequencing, what it means for MPN patient care, and potential future developments from next-generation sequencing.

See More From the MPN TelemEDucation Resource Center

Related Resources:

Does Remote Patient Monitoring Mean for MPN Patients?

MPN Treatment Tools and Advancements

How Does Artificial Intelligence (AI) Improve MPN Patient Care?


Transcript:

Next-generation sequencing is a DNA analysis process that allows for sequencing of a portion of a patient’s genome. The process allows for processing of multiple DNA sequences in parallel. Next-generation sequencing also can identify hereditary cancer mutation carriers, cancer mutations, and other things.

Next-generation sequencing is another medical advancement that helps improve MPN patient care. By identifying cancer mutations and hereditary cancer mutation carriers, next-generation sequencing helps oncologists to further refine targeted therapies and personalized medicine – leading to optimal patient care.

As more research continues in next-generation sequencing, it’s possible that new genetic mutations will be discovered to further enhance quality of life with patient symptoms and treatment side effects.

Please remember to ask your healthcare team what may be right for you.

Understanding New Targeted Therapies for Prostate Cancer

Understanding New Targeted Therapies for Prostate Cancer from Patient Empowerment Network on Vimeo.

Which prostate cancer therapies are experts excited about? Dr. Heather Cheng from Seattle Cancer Care Alliance shares information about recent treatment advancements and how the therapies are utilized to help provide optimal prostate cancer care.

See More from Prostate Cancer TelemEDucation

Related Programs:

What Are PSA and PSMA?

What Are PSA and PSMA?

Telemonitoring and How It Benefits Prostate Cancer Patients

Telemonitoring and How It Benefits Prostate Cancer Patients 

New Developments in Prostate Cancer Care

New Developments in Prostate Cancer Care 


Transcript:

Sherea Cary:

So, Dr. Cheng, share with us some of the new treatments that you and your colleagues are excited about? 

Dr. Heather Cheng:

Thank you. So I am a medical oncologist, I specialize in genetics, most of my patients have more advanced prostate cancer, meaning they have had surgery to remove their prostate, but then their cancer continued to grow or that they have radiation and their cancer continued to grow, and we are…then looking at treatments that are medical, and by that I mean they are given through a pill, or they’re given and through an injection and they travel throughout the body and treat the cancer…wherever the cancer is.

And I think what I get very excited about is that we have new targeted therapies, and by that I mean some of my patients to have certain mutations in their cancers or DNA changes in their cancer, have access to newer treatments like a pill, for example, called in a family called PARP inhibitor, that are really especially effective against cancers that have that type of mutation. So can’t we learn about this whether it’s a good fit or whether that person’s cancer might especially be well treated by that drug by doing DNA sequencing of the cancer or DNA sequencing of that person’s DNA, inherited DNA. So, both of those can give us clues about this kind of special treatment toolboxes that I get very excited about, and so I think that’s the frontier in oncology, but also in prostate cancer as well.